7

Any fast & accurate atan/arctan approximation function/algorithm out there? Input: x = (0, 1] (minimum x requirement). Output: in radians

double FastArcTan(double x)
{
    return M_PI_4*x - x*(fabs(x) - 1)*(0.2447 + 0.0663*fabs(x));
}

I've found this function above online but it gave a max error of 1.6 radians which is too big.

4
  • 1
    You have typed the wrong Google url...
    – Eugene Sh.
    Mar 1, 2017 at 17:35
  • 1
    Not sure where that formula came from... have you looked at just using first order approximation (as pointed out in math.stackexchange.com/questions/128514/…) ... something like x - (1.0/3) * (x ** 3) + (1.0/5) * (x ** 5) won't be perfect (and the error grows the closer you get to 1) but I'm pretty sure it will be < 1.6 radians
    – Foon
    Mar 1, 2017 at 18:18
  • 1
    If you are willing to precompute a few values with a slow, accurate arctan algorithm, then you can use piecewise polynomial interpolation. The benefit of piecewise polynomial interpolation is that you can get almost any arbitrary amount of precision; it only depends on how many precomputed values you are willing to have. You can algebraically determine the number of values you need to store to get your desired precision. Mar 1, 2017 at 21:16
  • OP's formula comes from Efficient Approximations for the Arctangent Function. The formula has a maximum absolute error of 0.0015 rad (0.086º).
    – micycle
    Oct 14, 2022 at 11:47

4 Answers 4

13

OP reported a max error of 1.6 radians (92 degrees) which is inconsistent with testing OP's code below, max error input x: 0 to 1 range of about 0.0015 radians. I suspect a mis-code or testing outside the range of 0...1. Did OP means 1.6 milli-radians?


Perhaps a more accurate a*x^5 + b*x^3 + c*x will still be fast enough for OP. It is about 4x more accurate on my machine on average and 2x better worst case. It uses an optimal 3-term polynomial as suggested by @Foon and @Matthew Pope

#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#ifndef M_PI_4
#define M_PI_4 (3.1415926535897932384626433832795/4.0)
#endif

double FastArcTan(double x) {
  return M_PI_4*x - x*(fabs(x) - 1)*(0.2447 + 0.0663*fabs(x));
}

#define A 0.0776509570923569
#define B -0.287434475393028
#define C (M_PI_4 - A - B)
#define FMT "% 16.8f"

double Fast2ArcTan(double x) {
  double xx = x * x;
  return ((A*xx + B)*xx + C)*x;
}

int main() {
  double mxe1 = 0, mxe2 = 0;
  double err1 = 0, err2 = 0;
  int n = 100;
  for (int i=-n;i<=n; i++) {
    double x = 1.0*i/n;
    double y = atan(x);
    double y_fast1 = FastArcTan(x);
    double y_fast2 = Fast2ArcTan(x);
    printf("%3d x:% .3f y:" FMT "y1:" FMT "y2:" FMT "\n", i, x, y, y_fast1, y_fast2);
    if (fabs(y_fast1 - y) > mxe1 ) mxe1  = fabs(y_fast1 - y);
    if (fabs(y_fast2 - y) > mxe2 ) mxe2  = fabs(y_fast2 - y);
    err1 += (y_fast1 - y)*(y_fast1 - y);
    err2 += (y_fast2 - y)*(y_fast2 - y);
  }
  printf("max error1: " FMT "sum sq1:" FMT "\n", mxe1, err1);
  printf("max error2: " FMT "sum sq2:" FMT "\n", mxe2, err2);
}

Output

 ...
 96 x: 0.960 y:      0.76499283y1:      0.76582280y2:      0.76438526
 97 x: 0.970 y:      0.77017091y1:      0.77082844y2:      0.76967407
 98 x: 0.980 y:      0.77529750y1:      0.77575981y2:      0.77493733
 99 x: 0.990 y:      0.78037308y1:      0.78061652y2:      0.78017777
100 x: 1.000 y:      0.78539816y1:      0.78539816y2:      0.78539816
max error1:       0.00150847sum sq1:      0.00023062
max error2:       0.00084283sum sq2:      0.00004826

Unclear why OP's code uses fabs() given "Input: x = (0, 1]".


[Update 2024]

For low precision functions such as double FastArcTan(double x), we can optimize the error at least 3 ways: error, relative error and unit in the last place error. With float x values in the range [0 ... 1.0], we can test every float and report the worst case.

Error is simply fast_f(x) - reference(x).

Relative error is (fast_f(x) - reference(x))/reference(x) with special consideration when reference(x) is 0 or a sub-normal number - using (fast_f(x) - reference(x))/FLT_MIN in those cases.

Unit in the last place (ULP) error is the the number of float away from the best answer. Example. It is approximately (fast_f(x) - reference(x))/round_down_to_a_power_of_2(reference(x)).

OP, with "gave a max error of 1.6 radians" wants to optimize the error.

In my experience, usually it is the relative error or ULP error that is desired to minimize.

This update reviews code to see if we can do better with some restrictions:

  • Only interested in float values in the primary range [0.0 ... 1.0].

  • No wider than float math coded.

  • Although fmaf() is useful to extend precision, it is not used here given that simple/fast trig functions are often needed on systems without a hardware fuse-multiply-add and good software ones are slow.

  • The end points f(0.0) and f(1.0) report the best result (e.g. 0.0, M_PI/4). If we tolerate more error in the ends, we can somewhat reduce overall errors. IMO, it is often desirable that the end-points have minimal error.

Test results:

                       :     radians,           %,         ULP
atanf (C library)      : 0.000000051, 0.000008442,       0.852
FastArcTan -OP         : 0.001508884, 5.882352941,  490209.000
Fast2ArcTan-This answer: 0.000843262, 0.961538462,   80838.000
atan_abs3-optimize err : 0.000704068, 1.041666667,   87799.000
atan_rel3-optimize rel : 0.001353447, 0.370370370,   31179.000
atan_ulp3-optimize UDP : 0.001581718, 0.315457413,   26536.822
atan_ulp9-optimize UDP : 0.000000095, 0.000012706,       1.592
atan_jw    -jw         : 0.000157066, 0.019998672,    2635.133
atan_jw_alt-optimize   : 0.000006579, 0.001461326,     111.129

atan_abs3() achieves a better result than Fast2ArcTan() for OP's goals.

I recommend atan_ulp3() for those wanting a few term low relative error.


float atan_abs3(float x) {
  const float a[3] = { //
      0.994766756708199f, -2.8543851807526100E-01f, 0.0760699247645105f};
  float xx = x * x;
  return ((a[2] * xx + a[1]) * xx + a[0]) * x;
}

float atan_rel3(float x) {
  const float a[3] = { //
      0.998141572179073f, -2.9774125603673200E-01f, 0.0849978472551071f};
  float xx = x * x;
  return ((a[2] * xx + a[1]) * xx + a[0]) * x;
}
float atan_ulp3(float x) {
  const float a[3] = { // 
      0.998418889819911f, -2.9993501171084700E-01f, 0.0869142852883849f};
  float xx = x * x;
  return ((a[2] * xx + a[1]) * xx + a[0]) * x;
}

float atan_ulp9(float x) {
  static const float a[9] = { {1.0f, -0.333331728467737f, 0.199940412794435f,
      -0.142123340834229f, 0.10668127080775f, -0.0755120841589429f,
      0.0431408641542157f, -0.0162911733512761f, 0.00289394245323327f}};
  float xx = x * x;
  float sum = 0.0;
  for (unsigned i = 9; i-- > 0;) {
    sum = sum * xx + a[i];
  }
  return sum * x;
}

float atan_jw(float x) {
  return 8 * x / (3 + sqrtf(25 + 80.0f / 3.0f * x * x));
}

float atan_jw_alt(float x) {
  return 8.430893743524f * x / (3.2105332277903100f + sqrtf(27.2515970979709f + 29.3591908371266f * x * x));
}

7
  • 1
    Thanks for the help. I realized that some of my inputs for the OP's code were >1 so that's why it was giving me max error of 1.6 radians. OP's code used fabs() because it works for input range of [-1,1], the (0,1] was just the range for my own input data. Mar 2, 2017 at 22:57
  • @YingyanWang A common range reduction for x > 1, use something like return M_PI_2 - FastArcTan(1/x) and similar code for x < 1. See stackoverflow.com/a/23097989/2410359 Mar 2, 2017 at 23:16
  • How did you calculate the coefficients A,B,C? Mar 15, 2022 at 10:27
  • @AnhDũngLê It has been 5 years. Hmmm., IIRC, For A,B, I did a best quadratic fit with Excel over a couple hundred evenly spaced data points. C = (M_PI_4 - A - B) to fit the curve at x = 1.0. Mar 15, 2022 at 13:58
  • 0.07933903622614606*x^5-0.28869023238086666*x^3+0.9953579537766772*x, this is slightly better with max error 6.086E-4 in range [0, 1]. That is, if you don't mind it's value at point 1.0 is not exactly pi/4.
    – ntysdd
    Oct 30, 2023 at 15:43
4

I have developed the following function for my needs based on the Pade-Chebyshev approximation. The code is written under Visual Studio (x86) and works in the entire range of source data. The function is only slightly inferior in accuracy to the standard atanf function, but significantly faster than it.

// Fast arctangent with single precission
_declspec(naked) float _vectorcall arctg(float x)
{
  // When |x|<=1 following formula is used:
  //
  //                       a0 + a0*a1*x^2 + a0*a2*x^4 + a0*a3*x^6
  // arctg x = x * ------------------------------------------------------- = x*P(x)/Q(x)
  //                a0 + a0*(a1+b0)*x^2 + a0*(a2+b1)*x^4 + a0*(a3+b2)*x^6
  //
  // The a0 constant is reduced, but it is needed to less the error
  // and prevent overflow at large |x|.
  // P(x) and Q(x) are 3th degree polinomials of x^2.
  // When 1<|x|<62919776 (approx.) used formula is
  //
  //                                     pi/2*|x|*x^6*Q(1/x)-x^6*P(1/x)
  // arctg x = pi/2*sgn(x)-arctg(1/x) = --------------------------------
  //                                             x*x^6*Q(1/x)
  //
  // Here x^6*P(1/x) and x^6*Q(1/x) are 3th degree polinomials of x^2 too.
  // When |x|>=62919776 used formula is arctg x = pi/2*sgn(x)
  // To improve accuracy at |x|>1 the constant pi/2 is replaced by the sum (pi-3)/2 and 3/2.
  //
  static const float ct[14] =   // Constants table
  {
    6.28740248E-17f,            // a0*(a1+b0)=a0*c1
    4.86816205E-17f,            // a0*a1
    2.24874633E-18f,            // a0*(a3+b2)=a0*c3
    4.02179944E-19f,            // a0*a3
    4.25772129E-17f,            // a0
    4.25772129E-17f,            // a0
    2.50182216E-17f,            // a0*(a2+b1)=a0*c2
    1.25756219E-17f,            // a0*a2
    0.0707963258f,              // (pi-3)/2
    1.5f,                       // 3/2
    1.0f,                       // 1
    -0.0707963258f,             // -(pi-3)/2
    -1.5f,                      // -3/2
    3.95889818E15f              // Threshold of x^2 when arctg(x)=pi/2*sgn(x)
  };
  _asm
  {
    vshufps xmm1,xmm0,xmm0,0    // xmm1 = x # x : x # x
    mov edx,offset ct           // edx contains the address of constants table
    vmulps xmm2,xmm1,xmm1       // xmm2 = x^2 # x^2 : x^2 # x^2
    vmovups xmm3,[edx+16]       // xmm3 = a0*a2 # a0*c2 : a0 # a0
    vmulps xmm4,xmm2,xmm2       // xmm4 = y^2 # y^2 : y^2 # y^2
    vucomiss xmm2,[edx+40]      // Compare y=x^2 to 1
    ja arctg_big                // Jump if |x|>1
    vfmadd231ps xmm3,xmm2,[edx] // xmm3 ~ a3*y+a2 # c3*y+c2 : a1*y+1 # c1*y+1
    vmovhlps xmm1,xmm1,xmm3     // xmm1 ~ a3*y+a2 # c3*y+c2
    vfmadd231ps xmm3,xmm4,xmm1  // xmm3 ~ a3*y^3+a2*y^2+a1*y+1 # c3*y^3+c2*y^2+c1*y+1
    vmovshdup xmm2,xmm3         // xmm2 = P; xmm3 = Q
    vdivss xmm2,xmm2,xmm3       // xmm2 = P/Q
    vmulss xmm0,xmm0,xmm2       // xmm0 = x*P/Q = arctg(x)
    ret                         // Return
      arctg_big:                // When |x|>1 use formula pi/2*sgn(x)-arctg(1/x)
    vfmadd213ps xmm3,xmm2,[edx] // xmm3 ~ a2*y+a3 # c2*y+c3 : y+a1 # y+c1
    vmovmskpd eax,xmm1          // eax=3 if x<0, otherwise eax=0
    vmovhlps xmm0,xmm0,xmm3     // xmm0 ~ a2*y+a3 # c2*y+c3
    vfmadd213ps xmm3,xmm4,xmm0  // xmm3 ~ y^3+a1*y^2+a2*y+a3 # y^3+c1*y^2+c2*y+c3
    vmovss xmm0,[edx+4*eax+32]  // xmm0 = (pi-3)/2*sgn(x)
    vucomiss xmm2,[edx+52]      // Compare y=x^2 to threshold value
    jnb arctg_end               // The data is already in xmm0, if |x|>=62919776
    vmovshdup xmm4,xmm3         // xmm4 = P; xmm3 = Q
    vmulss xmm1,xmm1,xmm3       // xmm1 = x*Q
    vfmsub132ss xmm0,xmm4,xmm1  // xmm0 = (pi-3)/2*|x|*Q-P
    vdivss xmm0,xmm0,xmm1       // xmm0 = (pi-3)/2*sgn(x)-P/(x*Q)
      arctg_end:                // Add to result 3/2*sgn(x)
    vaddss xmm0,xmm0,[edx+4*eax+36] // xmm0 = pi/2*sgn(x)-P/(x*Q)
    ret                         // Return
  }
}

Below is similar code for the arctangent function returns the angle in degrees.

_declspec(naked) float _vectorcall arctgD(float x) // arctangent in degrees
{
  static const float ct[12] =       // Constants table
  {
    1.92582580E-14f,                // a0*(a1+b0)=a0*c1
    8.54345240E-13f,                // a0*a1 (in degrees)
    6.88789034E-16f,                // a0*(a3+b2)=a0*c3
    7.05811633E-15f,                // a0*a3 (in degrees)
    1.30413631E-14f,                // a0
    7.47215061E-13f,                // a0 (in degrees)
    7.66305964E-15f,                // a0*(a2+b1)=a0*c2
    2.20697728E-13f,                // a0*a2 (in degrees)
    90.0f,                          // 90
    1.0f,                           // 1
    2.25592738E14f,                 // Threshold of x^2 when arctgD(x)=90*sgn(x)
    -90.0f                          // -90
  };
  _asm
  {
    vshufps xmm1,xmm0,xmm0,0        // xmm1 = x # x : x # x
    mov edx,offset ct               // edx contains the address of constants table
    vmulps xmm2,xmm1,xmm1           // xmm2 = x^2 # x^2 : x^2 # x^2
    vmovups xmm3,[edx+16]           // xmm3 = a0*a2 # a0*c2 : a0 # a0
    vmulps xmm4,xmm2,xmm2           // xmm4 = y^2 # y^2 : y^2 # y^2
    vucomiss xmm2,[edx+36]          // Compare y=x^2 to 1
    ja arctg_big                    // Goto if |x|>1
    vfmadd231ps xmm3,xmm2,[edx]     // xmm3 ~ a3*y+a2 # c3*y+c2 : a1*y+1 # c1*y+1
    vmovhlps xmm1,xmm1,xmm3         // xmm1 ~ a3*y+a2 # c3*y+c2
    vfmadd231ps xmm3,xmm4,xmm1      // xmm3 ~ a3*y^3+a2*y^2+a1*y+1 # c3*y^3+c2*y^2+c1*y+1
    vmovshdup xmm2,xmm3             // xmm2 = P; xmm3 = Q
    vdivss xmm2,xmm2,xmm3           // xmm2 = P/Q
    vmulss xmm0,xmm0,xmm2           // xmm0 = x*P/Q = arctgD(x)
    ret                             // Return
      arctg_big:                    // When |x|>1 use formula 90*sgn(x)-arctgD(1/x)
    vfmadd213ps xmm3,xmm2,[edx]     // xmm3 ~ a2*y+a3 # c2*y+c3 : y+a1 # y+c1
    vmovmskpd eax,xmm1              // eax=3 if x<0, otherwise eax=0
    vmovhlps xmm0,xmm0,xmm3         // xmm0 ~ a2*y+a3 # c2*y+c3
    vfmadd213ps xmm3,xmm4,xmm0      // xmm3 ~ y^3+a1*y^2+a2*y+a3 # y^3+c1*y^2+c2*y+c3
    vmovss xmm0,[edx+4*eax+32]      // xmm0 = 90*sgn(x)
    vcomiss xmm2,[edx+40]           // Compare y=x^2 to threshold value
    jnb arctg_end                   // If |x|>=15019745 result already done
    vmovshdup xmm4,xmm3             // xmm4 = P; xmm3 = Q
    vmulss xmm1,xmm1,xmm3           // xmm1 = x*Q
    vdivss xmm4,xmm4,xmm1           // xmm4 = P/(x*Q)
    vsubss xmm0,xmm0,xmm4           // xmm0 = 90*sgn(x)-P/(x*Q)
      arctg_end:                    // xmm0 = arctgD(x)
    ret                             // Return
  }
}
22
  • 1
    The function provides almost complete float accuracy over the entire range. The error is mainly due to rounding errors of intermediate calculation results. The approximating fractional-rational function itself has a relative error of no more than 3*10^-9, which exceeds the accuracy of the float format.
    – aenigma
    May 3, 2022 at 4:12
  • 1
    @aenigma: I let my heuristic optimizer run for ten days. Most accurate solution found has a maximum error of 4.02802 ulps at |x| = 0.544157028f. Coefficients are: 6.28740778e-17f, 4.86816768e-17f, 2.24874860e-18f, 4.02182452e-19f, 4.25772063e-17f, 4.25772063e-17f, 2.50182596e-17f, 1.25756368e-17f
    – njuffa
    May 27, 2022 at 18:25
  • 1
    @njuffa Thank you. I am also looking for a solution that is more accurate in terms of maximum ulp. But the program will work for a long time. If I find something, I'll share it. The coefficients I initially proposed provide a solution close to optimal in terms of RMS relative error.
    – aenigma
    May 29, 2022 at 14:34
  • 1
    @kimstik The accuracy of the approximation used should depend on the needs of the application. But if a sufficiently unified algorithm is created, it is desirable to ensure accuracy close to the full accuracy of the data format. For float-type numbers with an absolute error of half the lowest digit of the mantissa, the average relative error is about 4E-8. Accordingly, a good approximation should provide an order of magnitude better accuracy in order to eliminate systematic component of error.
    – aenigma
    Jul 11, 2022 at 16:23
  • 2
    @njuffa Here is a solution that provides a maximum error of about 3 ulps. Coefficients are: 5.10944634e-17f, 3.95610345e-17f, 1.82743967e-18f, 3.26830821e-19f, 3.46002967e-17f, 3.46002967e-17f, 2.03310142e-17f, 1.02195567e-17f. But it gives a slightly larger mean square relative error: 2.32272978e-8 versus 2.22521892e-8.
    – aenigma
    Jun 13, 2023 at 6:24
1

Inverse tangent seems to be approximated really well as a polynomial in z=x/(x+pi/3) space. The following coefficients produce a max error of 4.07e-9 on your interval.

z0 = 0.0;
z1 = 1.0471985201240248;
z2 = 1.047102380719068;
z3 = 0.6678082665364844;
z4 = -0.16312555173050677;
z5 = -0.33989938855441837;
z6 = -5.8773286456840355;
z7 = 17.33961311116544;
z8 = -49.09950369422959;
z9 = 82.10190353000648;
z10 = -60.11210171537528;
z11 = 14.183376881192657;

You can also get down to 1.23e-14 with higher order polynomials (19th).

Here's some C# code (references Accord.net) to see the tradeoff between accuracy and number of coefficients.

using Accord.Math;
using Accord.Statistics.Models.Regression.Linear;
using System.Management;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

foreach(var degree in new[] { 3, 5, 7, 11, 15, 19, 23, 27 })
{
    var N = 5000;
    var ols = new OrdinaryLeastSquares() { UseIntercept = false };

    var inp = new double[N][];
    var outputs = new double[N];

    for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
    {
        double x = (double)i / (double)N;

        inp[i] = new double[degree];
        inp[i][0] = x / (Math.PI /3 + x);
        for (int j = 1; j < degree; ++j)
            inp[i][j] = inp[i][0] * inp[i][j - 1];

        outputs[i] = Math.Atan(x);
    }

    MultipleLinearRegression regression = ols.Learn(inp, outputs);

    var r = new List<double>();
    foreach (var w in regression.Weights)
        Console.WriteLine(w);

    var model = inp.Dot(regression.Weights);
    var diff = 0.0;

    for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
        diff = Math.Max(Math.Abs(model[i] - outputs[i]), diff);

    Console.WriteLine("++++++++++++++++++++++");
    Console.WriteLine(diff);
    Console.WriteLine("++++++++++++++++++++++");
}
Console.ReadLine();
1

I found this that i use for x [0,+inf]

for x>2 i add +0.02 to fix

6
  • 1
    What is the average relative approximation error? Have you been optimizing constants? If the approximating function is chosen successfully, then the selection of coefficients should show good results. Is there a problem using your function when x<0?
    – aenigma
    Sep 1, 2023 at 15:21
  • The formula was found here: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6010512 I use it only for [0,+inf] range but it's not very accurate
    – Johnwhile
    Sep 1, 2023 at 20:09
  • 1
    Thanks for the link! Very interesting. Apparently, this approximation is not very accurate, but for its accuracy it has a good performance, i.e. it has the right to exist. This approximation can be improved slightly if the coefficients are optimized in it and the code is written efficiently (for example, in assembler).
    – aenigma
    Sep 2, 2023 at 12:44
  • By the way, the approximating function is odd, so it works for any x (including x<0).
    – aenigma
    Sep 2, 2023 at 12:55
  • The function you have given is the minorant of the arctangent (formulas 1.4, 1.5). To get a better approximation, you can try to take some average of the majorant and minorant coefficients. For example, the following approximate formula can be obtained from formula 1.7: atan(x) = pi^2*x/(4+sqrt((pi^2-4)*sqrt(32)+(2*pi*x)^2)).
    – aenigma
    Sep 3, 2023 at 2:50

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