159

I mean, a radio button itself consists of a round shape and a dot at the center (when the button is selected). What I want to change is the color of both. Can this be done using CSS?

1
  • 7
    Using CSS you can use filter: grayscale(1); for dark grey, or use filter: hue-rotate() for other colors, in case you don't want to create a custom element.
    – 27px
    Nov 16 '20 at 4:15

21 Answers 21

168

A quick fix would be to overlay the radio button input style using :after, however it's probably a better practice to create your own custom toolkit.

    input[type='radio']:after {
        width: 15px;
        height: 15px;
        border-radius: 15px;
        top: -2px;
        left: -1px;
        position: relative;
        background-color: #d1d3d1;
        content: '';
        display: inline-block;
        visibility: visible;
        border: 2px solid white;
    }

    input[type='radio']:checked:after {
        width: 15px;
        height: 15px;
        border-radius: 15px;
        top: -2px;
        left: -1px;
        position: relative;
        background-color: #ffa500;
        content: '';
        display: inline-block;
        visibility: visible;
        border: 2px solid white;
    }
<input type='radio' name="gender"/>
<input type='radio' name="gender"/>

4
  • 2
    This worked well for me. Great solution when you don't want to add any extra elements or use images.
    – Swen
    Dec 22 '16 at 15:57
  • 4
    In general browsers do accept ":after" styling only for container elements - as defined in W3C. Input is no container and thus generally does not support after styling. w3.org/TR/CSS2/generate.html#before-after-content
    – Ina
    May 16 '17 at 6:42
  • Just plopping a timestamp to enforce previous observations - it still only works in Chrome (60.0.3112.90). I tried it on Microsoft Edge (38.14393.1066.0) and Firefox (54.0.1, 32-bit) but no dice.
    – markreyes
    Aug 24 '17 at 16:47
  • 3
    Updating from @markreyes: Works in Chrome (64-bit 73.0.3683.75), works somewhat in Safari (12.0.3), and doesn't work in Firefox (64-bit 65.0.1) on March 15 2019.
    – jarhill0
    Mar 16 '19 at 2:12
96

A radio button is a native element specific to each OS/browser. There is no way to change its color/style, unless you want to implement custom images or use a custom Javascript library which includes images (e.g. this - cached link)

6
  • I believe so. No browser that I know of presents a way to configure the look of radio buttons, you will have to use a JS library to accomplish this.
    – Fred
    Aug 6 '14 at 6:21
  • Or use css but you need the image like you said. This is a bit strange
    – AturSams
    Aug 6 '14 at 8:12
  • 1
    Post 8/1/2014: This method will now disable and remove the input field from the submitted form data. It is in response to abuse by companies that placed checkboxes out of sight, that declared their users agreed to permission and regulations the visitors could not evaluate before proceeding. If the literal button is not displayed on the screen, it is considered 'disabled'
    – ppostma1
    Aug 30 '16 at 19:43
  • 3
    Read my answer below for a modern solution using CSS.
    – klewis
    Mar 16 '17 at 21:29
  • 'this' link is currently 404'ing. If it ever comes back, let us know!
    – markreyes
    Aug 24 '17 at 16:40
49

As Fred mentioned, there is no way to natively style radio buttons in regards to color, size, etcc. But you can use CSS Pseudo elements to setup an impostor of any given radio button, and style it. Touching on what JamieD said, on how we can use the :after Pseudo element, you can use both :before and :after to achieve a desirable look.

Benefits of this approach:

  • Style your radio button and also Include a label for content.
  • Change the outer rim color and/or checked circle to any color you like.
  • Give it a transparent look with modifications to background color property and/or optional use of the opacity property.
  • Scale the size of your radio button.
  • Add various drop shadow properties such as CSS drop shadow inset where needed.
  • Blend this simple CSS/HTML trick into various Grid systems, such as Bootstrap 3.3.6, so it matches the rest of your Bootstrap components visually.

Explanation of short demo below:

  • Set up a relative in-line block for each radio button
  • Hide the native radio button sense there is no way to style it directly.
  • Style and align the label
  • Rebuilding CSS content on the :before Pseudo-element to do 2 things - style the outer rim of the radio button and set element to appear first (left of label content). You can learn basic steps on Pseudo-elements here - http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_pseudo_elements.asp
  • If the radio button is checked, request for label to display CSS content (the styled dot in the radio button) afterwards.

The HTML

<div class="radio-item">
    <input type="radio" id="ritema" name="ritem" value="ropt1">
    <label for="ritema">Option 1</label>
</div>

<div class="radio-item">
    <input type="radio" id="ritemb" name="ritem" value="ropt2">
    <label for="ritemb">Option 2</label>
</div>

The CSS

.radio-item {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  padding: 0 6px;
  margin: 10px 0 0;
}

.radio-item input[type='radio'] {
  display: none;
}

.radio-item label {
  color: #666;
  font-weight: normal;
}

.radio-item label:before {
  content: " ";
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  top: 5px;
  margin: 0 5px 0 0;
  width: 20px;
  height: 20px;
  border-radius: 11px;
  border: 2px solid #004c97;
  background-color: transparent;
}

.radio-item input[type=radio]:checked + label:after {
  border-radius: 11px;
  width: 12px;
  height: 12px;
  position: absolute;
  top: 9px;
  left: 10px;
  content: " ";
  display: block;
  background: #004c97;
}

A short demo to see it in action

In conclusion, no JavaScript, images or batteries required. Pure CSS.

4
  • 1
    This technique worked for me in Chrome (60.0.3112.90). I tried it on Microsoft Edge (38.14393.1066.0) and Firefox (54.0.1, 32-bit) as well.
    – markreyes
    Aug 24 '17 at 18:24
  • 1
    Works for me in Safari 11.1 (latest).
    – staxim
    May 16 '18 at 14:16
  • Fast forward to 2021, this works in Edge 88.0.705.53, chrome 88.0.4324.104 and firefox 81.0.1. Great solution, thanks for this
    – chopper24
    Jan 30 at 6:46
  • this works in chrome 90.0.4430.212 and others also. Simply great solution, thanks for this @klewis
    – Amit Singh
    May 13 at 8:04
36

Only if you are targeting webkit-based browsers (Chrome and Safari, maybe you are developing a Chrome WebApp, who knows...), you can use the following:

input[type='radio'] {
   -webkit-appearance: none;
}

And then style it as if it were a simple HTML element, for example applying a background image.

Use input[type='radio']:active for when the input is selected, to provide the alternate graphics

Update: As of 2018 you can add the following to support multiple browser vendors:

input[type="radio"] {
  -webkit-appearance: none;
  -moz-appearance: none;
  appearance: none;
}
3
25

You can achieve customized radio buttons in two pure CSS ways

  1. Via removing standard appearance using CSS appearance and applying custom appearance. Unfortunately this was doesn't work in IE for Desktop (but works in IE for Windows Phone). Demo:

    input[type="radio"] {
      /* remove standard background appearance */
      -webkit-appearance: none;
      -moz-appearance: none;
      appearance: none;
      /* create custom radiobutton appearance */
      display: inline-block;
      width: 25px;
      height: 25px;
      padding: 6px;
      /* background-color only for content */
      background-clip: content-box;
      border: 2px solid #bbbbbb;
      background-color: #e7e6e7;
      border-radius: 50%;
    }
    
    /* appearance for checked radiobutton */
    input[type="radio"]:checked {
      background-color: #93e026;
    }
    
    /* optional styles, I'm using this for centering radiobuttons */
    .flex {
      display: flex;
      align-items: center;
    }
    <div class="flex">
      <input type="radio" name="radio" id="radio1" />
      <label for="radio1">RadioButton1</label>
    </div>
    <div class="flex">
      <input type="radio" name="radio" id="radio2" />
      <label for="radio2">RadioButton2</label>
    </div>
    <div class="flex">
      <input type="radio" name="radio" id="radio3" />
      <label for="radio3">RadioButton3</label>
    </div>

  2. Via hiding radiobutton and setting custom radiobutton appearance to label's pseudoselector. By the way no need for absolute positioning here (I see absolute positioning in most demos). Demo:

    *,
    *:before,
    *:after {
      box-sizing: border-box;
    }
    
    input[type="radio"] {
      display: none;
    }
    
    input[type="radio"]+label:before {
      content: "";
      /* create custom radiobutton appearance */
      display: inline-block;
      width: 25px;
      height: 25px;
      padding: 6px;
      margin-right: 3px;
      /* background-color only for content */
      background-clip: content-box;
      border: 2px solid #bbbbbb;
      background-color: #e7e6e7;
      border-radius: 50%;
    }
    
    /* appearance for checked radiobutton */
    input[type="radio"]:checked + label:before {
      background-color: #93e026;
    }
    
    /* optional styles, I'm using this for centering radiobuttons */
    label {
      display: flex;
      align-items: center;
    }
    <input type="radio" name="radio" id="radio1" />
    <label for="radio1">RadioButton1</label>
    <input type="radio" name="radio" id="radio2" />
    <label for="radio2">RadioButton2</label>
    <input type="radio" name="radio" id="radio3" />
    <label for="radio3">RadioButton3</label>

11

you can use the checkbox hack as explained in css tricks

http://css-tricks.com/the-checkbox-hack/

working example of radio button:

http://codepen.io/Angelata/pen/Eypnq

input[type=radio]:checked ~ .check {}
input[type=radio]:checked ~ .check .inside{}

Works in IE9+, Firefox 3.5+, Safari 1.3+, Opera 6+, Chrome anything.

0
5

simple cross browser custom radio button example for you

.checkbox input{
    display: none;
}
.checkbox input:checked + label{
    color: #16B67F;
}
.checkbox input:checked + label i{
    background-image: url('http://kuzroman.com/images/jswiddler/radio-button.svg');
}
.checkbox label i{
    width: 15px;
    height: 15px;
    display: inline-block;
    background: #fff url('http://kuzroman.com/images/jswiddler/circle.svg') no-repeat 50%;
    background-size: 12px;
    position: relative;
    top: 1px;
    left: -2px;
}
<div class="checkbox">
  <input type="radio" name="sort" value="popularity" id="sort1">
  <label for="sort1">
        <i></i>
        <span>first</span>
    </label>

  <input type="radio" name="sort" value="price" id="sort2">
  <label for="sort2">
        <i></i>
        <span>second</span>
    </label>
</div>

https://jsfiddle.net/kuzroman/ae1b34ay/

2
  • This is not working for bootstrap, can you pls update with bootstrap May 14 '18 at 7:38
  • The image sources(svgs) and fiddle are dead. Therefore, the snippet is not working. Sep 10 at 12:42
5

Try something like this:

<html>
<head>
<style>
#yes{
  border:2px solid white;
  box-shadow:0 0 0 1px #392;
  appearance:none;
  border-radius:50%;
  width:12px;
  height:12px;
  background-color:#fff;
  transition:all ease-in 0.2s;

}
#yes:checked{
  background-color:#392;
}
#no{
  border:2px solid white;
  box-shadow:0 0 0 1px #932;
  appearance:none;
  border-radius:50%;
  width:12px;
  height:12px;
  background-color:#fff;
  transition:all ease-in 0.2s;

}
#no:checked{
  background-color:#932;
}
</style>
<body>
<input id="yes" type="radio" name="s"><label for="yes">Yes</label></br>
<input id="no" type="radio" name="s"><label for="no">No</label>
</body>
</html>
There is less of code, it looks better and you don't need to play with :before , :after and position to reach the effect.

1
  • Worked for me! Thank you.
    – Rahul Vala
    Aug 5 at 20:49
4

Well to create extra elements we can use :after, :before (so we don’t have to change the HTML that much). Then for radio buttons and checkboxes we can use :checked. There are a few other pseudo elements we can use as well (such as :hover). Using a mixture of these we can create some pretty cool custom forms. check this

4

I builded another fork of @klewis' code sample to demonstrate some playing with pure css and gradients by using :before/:after pseudo elements and a hidden radio input button.

enter image description here

HTML:

sample radio buttons:
<div style="background:lightgrey;">
    <span class="radio-item">
        <input type="radio" id="ritema" name="ritem" class="true" value="ropt1" checked="checked">
        <label for="ritema">True</label>
    </span>

    <span class="radio-item">
        <input type="radio" id="ritemb" name="ritem" class="false" value="ropt2">
        <label for="ritemb">False</label>
    </span>
</div>

:

CSS:

.radio-item input[type='radio'] {
    visibility: hidden;
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    margin: 0 5px 0 5px;
    padding: 0;
}
    .radio-item input[type=radio]:before {
        position: relative;
        margin: 4px -25px -4px 0;
        display: inline-block;
        visibility: visible;
        width: 20px;
        height: 20px;
        border-radius: 10px;
        border: 2px inset rgba(150,150,150,0.75);
        background: radial-gradient(ellipse at top left, rgb(255,255,255) 0%, rgb(250,250,250) 5%, rgb(230,230,230) 95%, rgb(225,225,225) 100%);
        content: "";
    }
        .radio-item input[type=radio]:checked:after {
            position: relative;
            top: 0;
            left: 9px;
            display: inline-block;
            visibility: visible;
            border-radius: 6px;
            width: 12px;
            height: 12px;
            background: radial-gradient(ellipse at top left, rgb(245,255,200) 0%, rgb(225,250,100) 5%, rgb(75,175,0) 95%, rgb(25,100,0) 100%);
            content: "";
        }
            .radio-item input[type=radio].true:checked:after {
                background: radial-gradient(ellipse at top left, rgb(245,255,200) 0%, rgb(225,250,100) 5%, rgb(75,175,0) 95%, rgb(25,100,0) 100%);
            }
            .radio-item input[type=radio].false:checked:after {
                background: radial-gradient(ellipse at top left, rgb(255,225,200) 0%, rgb(250,200,150) 5%, rgb(200,25,0) 95%, rgb(100,25,0) 100%);
            }
.radio-item label {
    display: inline-block;
    height: 25px;
    line-height: 25px;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

preview: https://www.codeply.com/p/y47T4ylfib

2

Try this css with transition:

enter image description here

Demo

$DarkBrown: #292321;

$Orange: #CC3300;

div {
  margin:0 0 0.75em 0;
}

input[type="radio"] {
    display:none;
}
input[type="radio"] + label {
    color: $DarkBrown;
    font-family:Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size:14px;
}
input[type="radio"] + label span {
    display:inline-block;
    width:19px;
    height:19px;
    margin:-1px 4px 0 0;
    vertical-align:middle;
    cursor:pointer;
    -moz-border-radius:  50%;
    border-radius:  50%;
}

input[type="radio"] + label span {
     background-color:$DarkBrown;
}

input[type="radio"]:checked + label span{
     background-color:$Orange;
}

input[type="radio"] + label span,
input[type="radio"]:checked + label span {
  -webkit-transition:background-color 0.4s linear;
  -o-transition:background-color 0.4s linear;
  -moz-transition:background-color 0.4s linear;
  transition:background-color 0.4s linear;
}

Html :

<div>
  <input type="radio" id="radio01" name="radio" />
  <label for="radio01"><span></span>Radio Button 1</label>
</div>

<div>
 <input type="radio" id="radio02" name="radio" />
 <label for="radio02"><span></span>Radio Button 2</label>
</div>
2

For those who prefer to start development with a minimal example, here's a simple custom radio button that doesn't depend on label:

[type="radio"] {
    visibility: hidden; /* hide default radio button */
  /* you may need to adjust margin here, too */
}
[type="radio"]::before { /* create pseudoelement */
    border: 2px solid gray; /* thickness, style, color */
    height: .9em; /* height adjusts with font */
    width: .9em; /* width adjusts with font */
    border-radius: 50%; /* make it round */
    display: block; /* or flex or inline-block */
    content: " "; /* won't display without this */
    cursor: pointer; /* appears clickable to mouse users */
    visibility: visible; /* reverse the 'hidden' above */
}

[type="radio"]:checked::before { /* selected */
  /* add middle dot when selected */
  /* slightly bigger second value makes it smooth */
  /* even more (e.g., 20% 50%) would make it fuzzy */
    background: radial-gradient(gray 36%, transparent 38%);
}
<br>
<input type="radio" name="example" id="one" value="one">
<label for="one">one</label>
<br>
<br>
<input type="radio" name="example" id="two" value="two">
<label for="two">two</label>

1
  • I recently had to use this approach for a project and Marcus's example above is the only one here that I found worked when there were more than two radios.
    – fuzzygroup
    Jun 28 at 20:39
1

This is not possible by native CSS. You'll have to use background images and some javascript tricks.

1

As other said, there's no way to achieve this in all browser, so best way of doing so crossbrowser is using javascript unobtrusively. Basically you have to turn your radiobutton into links (fully customizable via CSS). each click on link will be bound to the related radiobox, toggling his state and all the others.

1

For my use all I wanted to do was change the colour and nothing else, so I've taken the answer from @klewis and changed it to...

  1. Make the radio the same as the browser default (Chrome in my case) using relative % and em instead of fixed px. Caveat: em is based on whatever the font-size of input[type=radio] is, which could be inherited. Adjustments to the values below may be necessary.
  2. Keep accessibility functions (like an outline when focused) of the original radio button by not using display: none; and by applying :before and :after to the original radio instead of the label.

/* make default radio 'invisible' */
input[type=radio] {
  -webkit-appearance: none;
  -moz-appearance: none;
  appearance: none;
}

/* make new radio outer circle */
input[type=radio]:before {
  content: " ";
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
  width: 0.8em;
  height: 0.8em;
  border-radius: 50%;
  border: 1px solid grey;
  background-color: transparent;
}

/* change colour of radio outer circle when checked */
input[type=radio]:checked:before {
  border-color: green;
}

/* make new radio inner circle when checked */
input[type=radio]:checked:after {
  content: " ";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  width: 0.55em;
  height: 0.55em;
  border-radius: 50%;
  top: 0.4em;
  left: 0.13em;
  background: green;
}

`

0

It may be helpful to bind radio-button to styled label. Futher details in this answer.

0

A clever way to do it would be to create a separate div with a height and width of -for example- 50px and then a radius of 50px lay this over your radio buttons...

0

You can embed a span element in the radio input then select a color of your choice to be rendered when a radio input is checked. Check out the example below sourced from w3schools.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<style>
/* The container */
.container {
  display: block;
  position: relative;
  padding-left: 35px;
  margin-bottom: 12px;
  cursor: pointer;
  font-size: 22px;
  -webkit-user-select: none;
  -moz-user-select: none;
  -ms-user-select: none;
  user-select: none;
}

/* Hide the browser's default radio button */
.container input {
  position: absolute;
  opacity: 0;
  cursor: pointer;
}

/* Create a custom radio button */
.checkmark {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  height: 25px;
  width: 25px;
  background-color: #eee;
  border-radius: 50%;
}

/* On mouse-over, add a grey background color */
.container:hover input ~ .checkmark {
  background-color: #ccc;
}

/* When the radio button is checked, add a blue background */
.container input:checked ~ .checkmark {
  background-color: #00a80e;
}

/* Create the indicator (the dot/circle - hidden when not checked) */
.checkmark:after {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  display: none;
}

/* Show the indicator (dot/circle) when checked */
.container input:checked ~ .checkmark:after {
  display: block;
}

/* Style the indicator (dot/circle) */
.container .checkmark:after {
    top: 9px;
    left: 9px;
    width: 8px;
    height: 8px;
    border-radius: 50%;
    background: white;
}
</style>
<body>

<h1>Custom Radio Buttons</h1>
<label class="container">One
  <input type="radio" checked="checked" name="radio">
  <span class="checkmark"></span>
</label>
<label class="container">Two
  <input type="radio" name="radio">
  <span class="checkmark"></span>
</label>
<label class="container">Three
  <input type="radio" name="radio">
  <span class="checkmark"></span>
</label>
<label class="container">Four
  <input type="radio" name="radio">
  <span class="checkmark"></span>
</label>

</body>

Changing the background color at this code segment below does the trick.

/* When the radio button is checked, add a blue background */
.container input:checked ~ .checkmark {
  background-color: #00a80e;
}

Sourced from how to create a custom radio button

0

If you are using react bootstrap Form.check you could do something like this

HTML

<Form.Check
type="radio"
id="Radio-card"
label={`check me out`}
name="paymentmethod"
value="card"
/>

SCSS

.form-check {
    display: flex;
    align-items: center;
    input[type="radio"] {
    -moz-appearance: none;
    appearance: none;
          
    width: 11px;
    height: 11px;
    padding: 1px;
    background-clip: content-box;
    border: 1px solid hotpink;
    background-color: white;
    border-radius: 50%;
    }
          
    input[type="radio"]:checked {
    outline: none;
    background-color: hotpink;
    border: 1px solid hotpink;
    }
    label {
    font-size: 14px;
    font-weight: 600;
    }
}
0

input[type='radio'] { accent-color: #232323; }

but it does not work with safari and opera.

2
  • As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Sep 14 at 0:34
  • This does not really answer the question. If you have a different question, you can ask it by clicking Ask Question. To get notified when this question gets new answers, you can follow this question. Once you have enough reputation, you can also add a bounty to draw more attention to this question. - From Review Sep 14 at 8:38
-2

A simple fix would be to use the following CSS property.

input[type=radio]:checked{
    background: \*colour*\;
    border-radius: 15px;
    border: 4px solid #dfdfdf;
}

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