36

I have a declarative pipeline script for my multibranch project in which I would like to read a text file and store the result as a string variable to be accessed by a later step in the pipeline. Using the snippet generator I tried to do something like this:

filename = readFile 'output.txt'

For which filename would be my string.

I get an error in the Jenkins console output:

org.codehaus.groovy.control.MultipleCompilationErrorsException: startup failed:
WorkflowScript: 30: Expected a step @ line 30, column 5.
            filename = readFile 'output.txt'

Do I need to use a withEnv step to set the output of readFile to a Jenkins environment variable? If so, how?

Thanks

1
  • can you edit your question according to the mcve guide?
    – Yuri G.
    Mar 1 '17 at 19:36
61

The error is due to that you're only allowed to use pipeline steps inside the steps directive. One workaround that I know is to use the script step and wrap arbitrary pipeline script inside of it and save the result in the environment variable so that it can be used later.

So in your case:

pipeline {
    agent any
    stages {
        stage("foo") {
            steps {
                script {
                    env.FILENAME = readFile 'output.txt'
                }
                echo "${env.FILENAME}"
            }
        }
    }
}
5
  • Strange, when run this (Jenkins 2.32.2) I get the expected result (added writeFile file: 'output.txt', text: 'asdsad' just before readFile, I get [Pipeline] echo asdsad as expected). Are you sure there is any contents in the file?
    – Jon S
    Mar 1 '17 at 20:05
  • Ya it's blank and that was due to some other issue in my logic, but I think your answer is what I was looking for. Thanks Mar 1 '17 at 20:26
  • 4
    one hint: you may want to trim like this readFile('output.txt').trim()
    – hao
    Jul 20 '18 at 9:03
  • Note that you cannot assign a credential(...) to a variable like this. It renders out to a string "@credentials(<anonymous>=BLAHBLAH>" and will then silently not work.
    – shuckc
    Jan 15 '19 at 12:49
  • Yes, the env variable isn't backed by a normal map, instead it operates 100% with strings, i.e. all values which are assigned to keys in the env variable are converted to strings (using toString() i guess).
    – Jon S
    Jan 15 '19 at 13:18
26

According to the documentation, you can also set global environment variables if you later want to use the value of the variable in other parts of your script. In your case, it would be setting it in the root pipeline:

pipeline {
  ...
  environment {
    FILENAME = readFile ...
  }
  ...
}
1
  • 1
    Just to clarify, as stated in other answers, value may be referenced as "${env.FILENAME}" later.
    – Mauricio
    Jun 29 at 17:22
10

We got around this by adding functions to the environment step, i.e.:

environment {
    ENVIRONMENT_NAME = defineEnvironment() 
}
...
def defineEnvironment() {
    def branchName = "${env.BRANCH_NAME}"
    if (branchName == "master") {
        return 'staging'
    }
    else {
        return 'test'
    }
}
2

A complete example for scripted pipepline:

       stage('Build'){
            withEnv(["GOPATH=/ws","PATH=/ws/bin:${env.PATH}"]) {
                sh 'bash build.sh'
            }
        }
2
  • 1
    This question doesn't say anything about running a build script, or adding to PATH. Feb 27 '18 at 8:50
  • 1
    True, but this is the only answer with scripted syntax, and this is a fine piece of example code.
    – Kyle
    Feb 21 '20 at 14:34
2

I can' t comment yet but, just a hint: use try/catch clauses to avoid breaking the pipeline (if you are sure the file exists, disregard)

    pipeline {
        agent any
            stages {
                stage("foo") {
                    steps {
                        script {
                            try {                    
                                env.FILENAME = readFile 'output.txt'
                                echo "${env.FILENAME}"
                            }
                            catch(Exception e) {
                                //do something, e.g. echo 'File not found'
                            }
                        }
                   }
    }

Another hint (this was commented by @hao, and think is worth to share): you may want to trim like this readFile('output.txt').trim()

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