-5

here is my list:

data_set = [['ID=j234hg\n'], ['Date=19 October 1969\n'], ['Title=Court Scene With Cardinal Richelieu\n'], ['ID=s4k5jk\n'], ['Date=8 December 1970\n'], ['Title=Crossing The Atlantic On A Tricycle\n'], ['ID=n4j6l3j\n'], ['Date=7 December 1972\n'], '[Title=Mr. Pither']]

I want to sort by ID: here is my code:

for index,l in enumerate(data_set):
    if 'ID=' == l[0][:1]:
        data_set[index]="ID="+l[0][6:].sort()
print('Sort by ID')
print(data_set)
print()

the code runs but does not sort

10
  • 4
    You should carefully consider your data structures! Mar 1 '17 at 19:51
  • not everyone here is advanced or intermediate
    – Supernova
    Mar 1 '17 at 19:57
  • can you update the data_set properly. You want to sort on the basis of ID but your data_set is a list containing lists as well as string
    – Mayank
    Mar 1 '17 at 20:03
  • It is never too "advanced" to carefully consider the data structure you are using. Python provides built-in container data structures like lists, dicts, sets, tuples etc that are easy to use and have a rich, literal syntax. Any python programmer should be carefully considering if these will make their life easier. Your data is being represented by a string which makes you have to parse it every time to work with it. Probably, you want to work with a dictionary. Mar 1 '17 at 20:16
  • 1
    Also, why are some of your strings wrapped in a list (as the single element in that list), and others are not? That is another example of something which just makes your life harder without any discernible benefits. Please take this as constructive criticism. For the record, I did not downvote you. Mar 1 '17 at 20:17
1

Considering that each row has fixed length of three items (ie: ID, Date, Title), you can first regroup input and then sort.

rows = [ data_set[i:i+3] for i in range(0,len(data_set), 3)]
print sum(sorted(rows, key = lambda r:r[0][0]), [])

output:

[['ID=j234hg\n'], ['Date=19 October 1969\n'], ['Title=Court Scene With Cardinal Richelieu\n'], ['ID=n4j6l3j\n'], ['Date=7 December 1972\n'], ['Title=Mr. Pither'], ['ID=s4k5jk\n'], ['Date=8 December 1970\n'], ['Title=Crossing The Atlantic On A Tricycle\n']]
0
0

Assuming your data_set looks something like this:

>>> data_set = [['ID=j234hg\n', 'Date=19 October 1969\n', 'Title=Court Scene With Cardinal Richelieu\n'], ['ID=s4k5jk\n', 'Date=8 December 1970\n', 'Title=Crossing The Atlantic On A Tricycle\n'], ['ID=n4j6l3j\n', 'Date=7 December 1972\n', 'Title=Mr. Pither']]

Try

>>> res = sorted(data_set, key=lambda x: x[0])
>>> res
[['ID=j234hg\n', 'Date=19 October 1969\n', 'Title=Court Scene With Cardinal Richelieu\n'], ['ID=n4j6l3j\n', 'Date=7 December
 1972\n', 'Title=Mr. Pither'], ['ID=s4k5jk\n', 'Date=8 December 1970\n', 'Title=Crossing The Atlantic On A Tricycle\n']]
1
  • the ouput puts all the dates first then IDs then Titles, let me try to tweak the code
    – Supernova
    Mar 1 '17 at 20:40
-1

Use sets or dictionary to this kind of tasks. With list you can eventually print as first elements with word "ID", but without related data as title, date etc.

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