0

So I'm experimenting and I'm trying to get a better understanding of how to manually place a pointer in memory in C.

So far What I've done is created a struct and assigned a pointer to it, and now I'm trying to create another struct exactly 'x' amount of memory spaces away from the first struct. for instance, if 'x' is 50 bytes, I would want both pointers to be 50 bytes away from each other.

any help would be appreciated!

edit*** I guess I left out a key point here where I used malloc() to set aside some memory to work with. and I'm trying to stay within the boundaries of that piece of memory that I've set aside. BUT i'm trying to give precise memory locations within that set aside piece of memory, relative to the starting location.

6
  • 1
    This sounds like an XY Problem. You shouldn't need to do this.
    – byxor
    Mar 2 '17 at 2:27
  • I agree this is an XY problem. But pointer arithmetic does exactly what you have described. So struct mystruct *p1 = &somestruct, *p2 = p1 + 1; will result in p2 pointing to where you want.
    – kaylum
    Mar 2 '17 at 2:32
  • @kaylum Whoops, I misread the question.
    – Schwern
    Mar 2 '17 at 2:37
  • As @Schwern has pointed out my comment only shows how to do pointer assignment. It does not mean the memory pointed to is valid. You'll have to describe your context more clearly to get a better answer. In general there is no way to guarantee that memory will be allocated where you want (though there are some mechanisms such as mmap that can attempt to do that).
    – kaylum
    Mar 2 '17 at 2:43
  • I guess I left out a key point here where I used malloc() to set aside some memory to work with. and I'm trying to stay within the boundaries of that piece of memory that I've set aside. BUT i'm trying to give precise memory locations within that set aside piece of memory, relative to the starting location.
    – DojoOria
    Mar 2 '17 at 2:45
2

If 'x' is 50 bytes, I would want both pointers to be 50 bytes away from each other.

You are in luck, because C has a perfect mechanism for placing pointers exactly the size of a struct apart. OK, not exactly exactly*, but close enough for most practical purposes.

You get this behavior by declaring an array of two items. They will be placed in memory apart by at least sizeof(struct mystruct), depending on the alignment of the struct and its actual size:

struct mystruct { ... }; // This is your struct definition
...
struct mystruct array[2];
struct mystruct *a = &array[0];
struct mystruct *b = &array[1];

Now pointers a and b are apart by sizeof(struct mystruct).

* Alignment becomes important when placing pointers exactly the size of the struct apart creates performance issues, or even impossible for the program to run on a given platform. For example, some platforms require placing pointers only at even addresses; if the first element of a struct is a pointer, and a struct has an odd size, then adding an extra byte at the end is required to make it possible for the program to run.

1

Pointers are just numbers corresponding to a memory location. You can do math on them, but it works a bit differently than normal. It's called pointer arithmetic.

Adding 1 to a pointer moves it forward in memory not 1 byte, but the size of whatever it's pointing at. If it's a char * it will move 1 byte. If it's a int * it will move 4 or 8 bytes depending on the size of your integers. If its a 50 byte struct, it will move forward 50 bytes.

So all you need to do is add 1 to your pointer.

#include <stdio.h>

struct example {
    char string[50];
};

int main() {
    struct example foo; 
    struct example *bar = &foo + 1;

    printf("%p %p\n", &foo, bar);
}

$ ./test
0x7fff5897b4a0 0x7fff5897b4d2

...except now bar is pointing to unallocated memory. If you try to use it, it will be undefined behavior.

If you want to make two structs adjacent to each other in memory that you can actually use, make an array.

#include <stdio.h>

struct example {
    char string[50];
};

int main() {
    struct example list[2];

    printf("%p %p\n", &list[0], &list[1]);
}

$ ./test
0x7fff5ba21470 0x7fff5ba214a2

Or if you're using heap memory...

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct example {
    char string[50];
};

int main() {
    struct example *list = malloc( 2 * sizeof(struct example) );

    printf("%p %p\n", &list[0], &list[1]);
}
1

I'm not sure how to place a pointer at a certain address, but I think there's some way to make sure two things are aligned, or a certain amount of bytes apart.

In K&R 2e, on the top of page 186:

screenshot

So I guess you can wrap your struct in a union, and typedef Align as some type with size of n, where n is the number of bytes you want them to be apart from each other.

2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.