96

Edit: I don't want to call handleChange only if the button has been clicked. It has nothing to do with handleClick. I gave an example in the @shubhakhatri answer's comment.

I want to change the input value according to state, the value is changing but it doesn't trigger handleChange() method. How can I trigger handleChange() method ?

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.state = {
    value: 'random text'
    }
  }
  handleChange (e) {
    console.log('handle change called')
  }
  handleClick () {
    this.setState({value: 'another random text'})
  }
  render () {
    return (
      <div>
        <input value={this.state.value} onChange={this.handleChange}/>
        <button onClick={this.handleClick.bind(this)}>Change Input</button>
      </div>
    )
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />,  document.getElementById('app'))

Here is the codepen link: http://codepen.io/madhurgarg71/pen/qrbLjp

5
  • As far as I understand is that you want to change the input only after the button has been clicked. Am I right?? Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 9:34
  • 1
    @ShubhamKhatri Sorry I was wrong, I don't want to change only after the button has been clicked. It's just and example where handleClick is just setting the state. It has nothing to do with handleClick. Sorry I interpreted wrong.
    – madhurgarg
    Commented Nov 6, 2017 at 9:48
  • Did you figure this out? As far as I can tell, there's no reason why the above script won't work, at least in the latest React version. I just tried it in the provided Codepen snippet, & it works fine.
    – Shan
    Commented Jan 15, 2019 at 5:32
  • What you have on the codepen is different from what is shown here. This works fine, absolutely no reason why it's not working. You probably wanted to check on the console that 'handle change called' Commented Feb 13, 2021 at 16:49
  • Should use functional components
    – mercury
    Commented Jun 3, 2021 at 15:34

10 Answers 10

45

You need to trigger the onChange event manually. On text inputs onChange listens for input events.

So in you handleClick function you need to trigger event like

handleClick () {
    this.setState({value: 'another random text'})
    var event = new Event('input', { bubbles: true });
    this.myinput.dispatchEvent(event);
  }

Complete code

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.state = {
    value: 'random text'
    }
  }
  handleChange (e) {
    console.log('handle change called')
  }
  handleClick () {
    this.setState({value: 'another random text'})
    var event = new Event('input', { bubbles: true });
    this.myinput.dispatchEvent(event);
  }
  render () {
    return (
      <div>
        <input readOnly value={this.state.value} onChange={(e) => {this.handleChange(e)}} ref={(input)=> this.myinput = input}/>
        <button onClick={this.handleClick.bind(this)}>Change Input</button>
      </div>
    )
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />,  document.getElementById('app'))

Codepen

Edit: As Suggested by @Samuel in the comments, a simpler way would be to call handleChange from handleClick if you don't need to the event object in handleChange like

handleClick () {
    this.setState({value: 'another random text'})
    this.handleChange();
  }

I hope this is what you need and it helps you.

5
  • Using a ref on an element is almost always the wrong answer, unless you need to do something can't be done other ways. Here, a much simpler solution is to simply call handleChange from handleClick, as suggested in this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/42550931/2608603
    – user2608603
    Commented Aug 24, 2017 at 12:21
  • 1
    @SamuelScheiderich Certainly a simpler way if you don't want the event object of onChange in handleChange. I did not include it in the original answer because handleChange contained the event as an argument Commented Aug 24, 2017 at 12:29
  • 2
    @ShubhamKhatri Sorry but I'm withdrawing my upvote. I just realised that your answer doesn't answer my question. What you are doing is calling handleChange method explicitly from handleClick. It's not about handleClick. React state doesn't know about handleClick method right? I'll give you a more practical example where we might need this. Let's say you have a login form and you saved the password. And when you come to the login page again your form input got filled by browser automatically. Now you want to invoke your handleChange method for some UI animation.
    – madhurgarg
    Commented Nov 6, 2017 at 9:38
  • 9
    Does not work at all as for 2019. Form now does not reacting to manual dispatchEvent for some reason
    – Limbo
    Commented Apr 11, 2019 at 14:53
  • @ShubhamKhatri, good day Shubham, great answer and I wanted to kindly ask you one question, Should we always use onChange handler for input fields. I was just creating calculator and decided to use e.g <input value:this.state.number> without using onChange. I just change state and then value of input also changes. Is it the right way? Or should I always use onChange whenever I work with input field?:)
    – Dickens
    Commented Sep 23, 2019 at 7:36
38

I tried the other solutions and nothing worked. This is because of input logic in React.js has been changed. For detail, you can see this link: https://hustle.bizongo.in/simulate-react-on-change-on-controlled-components-baa336920e04.

In short, when we change the value of input by changing state and then dispatch a change event then React will register both the setState and the event and consider it a duplicate event and swallow it.

The solution is to call native value setter on input (See setNativeValue function in following code)

Example Code

import React, { Component } from 'react'
export class CustomInput extends Component {

    inputElement = null;
    
    // THIS FUNCTION CALLS NATIVE VALUE SETTER
    setNativeValue(element, value) {
        const valueSetter = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(element, 'value').set;
        const prototype = Object.getPrototypeOf(element);
        const prototypeValueSetter = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(prototype, 'value').set;

        if (valueSetter && valueSetter !== prototypeValueSetter) {
            prototypeValueSetter.call(element, value);
        } else {
            valueSetter.call(element, value);
        }
    }


    constructor(props) {
        super(props);

        this.state = {
            inputValue: this.props.value,
        };
    }

    addToInput = (valueToAdd) => {
        this.setNativeValue(this.inputElement, +this.state.inputValue + +valueToAdd);
        this.inputElement.dispatchEvent(new Event('input', { bubbles: true }));
    };

    handleChange = e => {
        console.log(e);
        this.setState({ inputValue: e.target.value });
        this.props.onChange(e);
    };

    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                <button type="button" onClick={() => this.addToInput(-1)}>-</button>
                <input
                    readOnly
                    ref={input => { this.inputElement = input }}
                    name={this.props.name}
                    value={this.state.inputValue}
                    onChange={this.handleChange}></input>
                <button type="button" onClick={() => this.addToInput(+1)}>+</button>
            </div>
        )
    }
}

export default CustomInput

Result

enter image description here

4
  • Are prototypeValueSetter.call and valueSetter.call switched around? In the example above valueSetter will only be called if a) It is undefined or b) it is strictly equal to prototypeValueSetter.
    – nik10110
    Commented Jun 16, 2021 at 19:32
  • I tested the code with them switched around - doesn't work. As a result I see no reason to not exclusively use prototypeValueSetter and delete all mentions of valueSetter.
    – nik10110
    Commented Jun 16, 2021 at 19:41
  • Why is the if() condition necessary in setNativeValue()? In other words, couldn't we just do Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(window.HTMLInputElement.prototype, "value").set.call(element, value);? (Please forgive the one-liner; it's hopefully easier to read a one-liner in comments)
    – rinogo
    Commented Dec 24, 2021 at 1:27
  • Thanks! your explanation was exactly what I was missing to understand my issue. Also, in my case, I just needed to add the dispatchEvent to the button.
    – Thremulant
    Commented Feb 2, 2022 at 20:08
14

I think you should change that like so:

<input value={this.state.value} onChange={(e) => {this.handleChange(e)}}/>

That is in principle the same as onClick={this.handleClick.bind(this)} as you did on the button.

So if you want to call handleChange() when the button is clicked, than:

<button onClick={this.handleChange.bind(this)}>Change Input</button>

or

handleClick () {
  this.setState({value: 'another random text'});
  this.handleChange();
}
1
  • I want to trigger handleChange when button is clicked. Its working by manually typing inside the input. Suppose the input is readOnly.
    – madhurgarg
    Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 9:32
9

In a functional component you can do this, let's assume we have a input[type=number]

const MyInputComponent = () => {
    const [numberValue, setNumberValue] = useState(0);
    const numberInput = useRef(null);

    /**
    * Dispatch Event on Real DOM on Change
    */
    useEffect(() => {
        numberInput.current.dispatchEvent(
            new Event("change", {
                detail: {
                    newValue: numberValue,
                },
                bubbles: true,
                cancelable: true,
            })
        );
    }, [numberValue]);

    return (
        <>
            <input    
                type="number"            
                value={numberValue}             
                ref={numberInput}
                inputMode="numeric"
                onChange={(e) => setNumberValue(e.target.value)}
            />
        </>
    )
}
2
  • 1
    This does work but the options properties in the Event object is just two which are bubbles and cancelable. Commented Oct 20, 2022 at 8:34
  • Yes you are right, I think it works because the value is already set via react, so the when listening to change event we can access the value on event.target, in this answer the detail: { newValue: numberValue } part is redundant and can be removed, or if you need extra information, CustomEvent should be used instead of Event which supports detail property Commented Feb 21, 2023 at 20:06
4

The other answers talked about direct binding in render hence I want to add few points regarding that.

You are not recommended to bind the function directly in render or anywhere else in the component except in constructor. Because for every function binding a new function/object will be created in webpack bundle js file hence the bundle size will grow. Your component will re-render for many reasons like when you do setState, new props received, when you do this.forceUpdate() etc. So if you directly bind your function in render it will always create a new function. Instead do function binding always in constructor and call the reference wherever required. In this way it creates new function only once because constructor gets called only once per component.

How you should do is something like below

constructor(props){
  super(props);
  this.state = {
    value: 'random text'
  }
  this.handleChange = this.handleChange.bind(this);
}

handleChange (e) {
  console.log('handle change called');
  this.setState({value: e.target.value});
}

<input value={this.state.value} onChange={this.handleChange}/>

You can also use arrow functions but arrow functions also does create new function every time the component re-renders in certain cases. You should know about when to use arrow function and when are not suppose to. For detailed explation about when to use arrow functions check the accepted answer here

1
  • 5
    This answers completely ignores the actual question. while the information presented in your answer is valuable in general, I do not think unrelated answers should exist, because it only creates clutter for people trying to find the actual useful which exactly (or closely) answers the topic
    – vsync
    Commented Aug 13, 2019 at 8:08
1

you must do 4 following step :

  1. create event

    var event = new Event("change",{
        detail: {
            oldValue:yourValueVariable,
            newValue:!yourValueVariable
        },
        bubbles: true,
        cancelable: true
    });
    event.simulated = true;
    let tracker = this.yourComponentDomRef._valueTracker;
    if (tracker) {
        tracker.setValue(!yourValueVariable);
    }
    
  2. bind value to component dom

    this.yourComponentDomRef.value = !yourValueVariable;
    
  3. bind element onchange to react onChange function

     this.yourComponentDomRef.onchange = (e)=>this.props.onChange(e);
    
  4. dispatch event

    this.yourComponentDomRef.dispatchEvent(event);
    

in above code yourComponentDomRef refer to master dom of your React component for example <div className="component-root-dom" ref={(dom)=>{this.yourComponentDomRef= dom}}>

1
  • 6
    From my experience, only the _valueTracker is indeed necessary and the event.simulated = true but the rest makes no sense. Why would you do value = !yourValueVariable ? makes no sense at all.
    – vsync
    Commented Jun 20, 2020 at 20:38
1

Approach with React Native and Hooks:

You can wrap the TextInput into a new one that watches if the value changed and trigger the onChange function if it does.

import React, { useState, useEffect } from 'react';
import { View, TextInput as RNTextInput, Button } from 'react-native';

// New TextInput that triggers onChange when value changes.
// You can add more TextInput methods as props to it.
const TextInput = ({ onChange, value, placeholder }) => {

  // When value changes, you can do whatever you want or just to trigger the onChange function
  useEffect(() => {
    onChange(value);
  }, [value]);

  return (
    <RNTextInput
      onChange={onChange}
      value={value}
      placeholder={placeholder}
    />
  );
};

const Main = () => {

  const [myValue, setMyValue] = useState('');

  const handleChange = (value) => {
    setMyValue(value);
    console.log("Handling value");
  };

  const randomLetters = [...Array(15)].map(() => Math.random().toString(36)[2]).join('');

  return (
    <View>
      <TextInput
        placeholder="Write something here"
        onChange={handleChange}
        value={myValue}
      />
      <Button
        title='Change value with state'
        onPress={() => setMyValue(randomLetters)}
      />
    </View>
  );
};

export default Main;
0

I know what you mean, you want to trigger handleChange by click button.

But modify state value will not trigger onChange event, because onChange event is a form element event.

2
  • But how then its get triggered when you save your login credentials and browser's autofill sets the input value.
    – madhurgarg
    Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 9:58
  • Actually, i think there is no need to trigger that function, maybe you should just tell me what actions you want to do. Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 10:22
-1

I had a similar need and end up using componentDidMount(), that one is called long after component class constructor (where you can initialize state from props - as an exmple using redux )

Inside componentDidMount you can then invoke your handleChange method for some UI animation or perform any kind of component properties updates required.

As an example I had an issue updating an input checkbox type programatically, that's why I end up using this code, as onChange handler was not firing at component load:

   componentDidMount() {

    // Update checked 
    const checkbox = document.querySelector('[type="checkbox"]');

    if (checkbox) 
      checkbox.checked = this.state.isChecked;
  }

State was first updated in component class constructor and then utilized to update some input component behavior

-2

Try this code if state object has sub objects like this.state.class.fee. We can pass values using following code:

this.setState({ class: Object.assign({}, this.state.class, { [element]: value }) }
1
  • Hello Atchutha! Please use proper code formatting so that the content is easily readable. Commented Mar 14, 2019 at 10:24

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