2

What I aim to achieve is to have a templated Wrapper class with various aliases. Here is a simplified preview:

template < typename Type >
class Wrapper {
public:
   Wrapper(Type* resource) : ptr(resource) {}
   ~Wrapper() { free(ptr); }

private:
   Type* ptr;
}

void free(SDL_Window* ptr) { SDL_DestroyWindow(ptr); }
void free(SDL_Renderer* ptr) { SDL_DestroyRenderer(ptr); }

using Window = Wrapper<SDL_Window>;
using Renderer = Wrapper<SDL_Renderer>;

I would like to allow creation of only these aliased instances of Wrapper class. One of the reasons, is that this being wrapper to a SDL resource pointers, it has different memory freeing functions depending on type of the pointer.

Best scenario I would like to achieve would be to make Wrapper class not visible outside the usage of aliases I create. Maybe there is a solution using anonymous namespace, but thaw would mean wrapper class can't be in header file.

  • 1
    Either put a static assert with a user-friendly message, or, define the class template's member functions in an implementation file, and implicitly instantiate only for the preferred subset of types – Piotr Skotnicki Mar 2 '17 at 13:37
  • I've also tried static_assert but I got an error that typeid(Type) == typeid(SDL_Window) isn't a constant expression – Maroš Beťko Mar 2 '17 at 13:44
  • 1
    You'd need std::is_same<Type, SDL_Window>::value, or use some template machinery like boost mpl list or your custom implementation – Piotr Skotnicki Mar 2 '17 at 13:46
  • Ok so static_assert filled with is_same statements works. Still is there a way to hide Wrapper completely, while only seeing defined aliases? – Maroš Beťko Mar 2 '17 at 13:54
  • You need at least the declaration to be in a header file, and explicitly instantiate the class tempalte – Piotr Skotnicki Mar 2 '17 at 13:58
3

Best scenario I would like to achieve would be to make Wrapper class not visible outside the usage of aliases I create.

This is possible using private and a wrapper class

class WrapperAccessor {
    template < typename Type >
    class Wrapper {
    public:
       Wrapper(Type* resource) : ptr(resource) {}
       ~Wrapper() { free(ptr); }

    private:
       Type* ptr;
    };

public:
    using Window = Wrapper<SDL_Window>;
    using Renderer = Wrapper<SDL_Renderer>;
};

using Window = WrapperAccessor::Window;
using Renderer = WrapperAccessor::Renderer;
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, that was exactly what I was looking for. – Maroš Beťko Mar 3 '17 at 11:30
1

How about std::enable_if, which will enable only certain types for your classes/functions?

Take a look at type_traits in C++11 and 14. You can do all kinds of static checks (checks at compile-time). For example, to check if the type is what you're expecting, you can use:

std::is_same<T,int>::value

And this will return true at compile time if T is int.

| improve this answer | |
  • I would probably go with something similar to check for the allowed types. – Marco A. Mar 2 '17 at 13:28
  • So I've tried this, specified all the types it should allow and then created an Wrapper<int>. It compiled and runs even though int specialization shouldn't be allowed at all, also no idea what happened in it's destructor because free(int) overload doesn't exist. – Maroš Beťko Mar 2 '17 at 13:32
  • @MarošBeťko If you don't want it to compile, then use static_if, instead of if. Here's how you implement it in C++11: stackoverflow.com/questions/37617677/… – The Quantum Physicist Mar 2 '17 at 13:33
  • @MarošBeťko Also if you use std::enable_if, you can prevent compiling with types you don't want. But enable_if has some steep learning curve and you have to do it right. – The Quantum Physicist Mar 2 '17 at 13:34
0

I think this can help

template <typename T, bool Allowed>
class WrapperBase;


template <typename T>
class WrapperBase<T, true>
{
};

template <typename T>
class WrapperBase<T, false>;

template < typename Type >
class WrapperBaseHelper : public WrapperBase<T, boost::is_base_of<SDL_Window, T>::value | boost::is_base_of<SDL_Renderer>::value ...e.t.c >
{
...
};
| improve this answer | |
0

In your specific case, I would use std::unique_ptr, something like:

template <typename T, T value> struct Call; // c++17 should allow Call<auto F>

template <typename T, void (*f)(T*)>
struct Call<void (*)(T*), f>
{
    void operator ()(T* p) const { f(p); }
};

#define AUTO(F) decltype(F), F // not needed in C++17

using Window = std::unique_ptr<SDL_Window, Call<AUTO(&SDL_DestroyWindow)>>;
using Renderer = std::unique_ptr<SDL_Renderer, Call<AUTO(&SDL_DestroyRenderer)>>;

That handles deleted copy and correct move semantic contrary to your snippet.

| improve this answer | |

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