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I am very new to TCP/IP networks and learning about sockets/ports. I have a few confusions. I am mentioning what I understand.

A node N1 has multiple processes running. Say a process P1 has some string that it wishes to send to some other Node N2. N1 will request OS to create a socket which is essentially like a network I/O streaming channel. Such a channel will be created and handed over to the process along with a socket descriptor. So, we can say that socket can be recognised in the world by the node i.e. IP of node + process which requested the socket. Hence, comes the concept of socket address which is basically IP of node + port address (used for identifying processs). So, my doubts are:

  1. From where comes the idea of ports here. Socket can be identified as IP of node + Process ID. Why ports are required to identify a process. Why can't the process descriptor be self sufficient. Why port address. Examples?

  2. Why do we need to bind the socket with a socket address if the node has to just pass the data and nothing needs to be received. Binding of socket address essentially means "to start recognising socket with IP address of node + port address apart from its descriptor" which is useful for other nodes if they wish to send some data to Node N1. But what I think is that for any process in a node that wish to communicate over network, there should be one "global" socket which will not be binded. All processes will use it for sending data only. If in case any node wish to recieve data, they can have a separate socket which will be binded so that other nodes in network can recognise that particular socket.

  3. Where exactly does TCP/UDP fit in the picture? Can I have two ports which are like TCP port 3000 and UDP port 3000 i.e. separate ports with different transport protocol but same port numbers. Is this possible with sockets too?

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So, we can say that socket can be recognised in the world by the node i.e. IP of node + process which requested the socket.

Not 'in the world'. Only within the localhost. The socket only exists within the localhost, and the process ID is only known within the localhost.

Hence, comes the concept of socket address which is basically IP of node + port address (used for identifying process)

No. The port identifies the service. The process implements the service.

From where comes the idea of ports here.

RFC 793.

Socket can be identified as IP of node + Process ID.

No they can't. A peer on another host has no way of getting a remote process ID. Some fixed operating-system-agnostic identifier is required. And a process can own many ports. The suggestion doesn't begin to make sense.

Why ports are required to identify a process.

Ports do not identify a process. The question doesn't make sense.

Why can't the process descriptor be self sufficient. Why port address.

Because the first question you asked is fallacious . This is just another version of it.

Why do we need to bind the socket with a socket address if the node has to just pass the data and nothing needs to be received.

Because connections are identified by address:port pairs.

Binding of socket address essentially means "to start recognising socket with IP address of node + port address apart from its descriptor" which is useful for other nodes if they wish to send some data to Node N1.

It is also rather useful for this node, to know where the incoming data should go.

But what I think is that for any process in a node that wish to communicate over network, there should be one "global" socket which will not be binded. All processes will use it for sending data only. If in case any node wish to recieve data, they can have a separate socket which will be binded so that other nodes in network can recognise that particular socket.

Regardless of the invalidity and pointlessness of this scheme, your thoughts are 40 years too late.

Can I have two ports which are like TCP port 3000 and UDP port 3000 i.e. separate ports with different transport protocol but same port numbers.

Yes.

Where exactly does TCP/UDP fit in the picture?

They implement ports.

Is this possible with sockets too?

I can't make any sense out of this question. All sockets are distinct from each other.

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