3

coord_polar curves lines, sometimes when you may not wish to (i.e. when the space is considered discrete not continuous):

iris %>% gather(dim, val, -Species) %>%
  group_by(dim, Species) %>% summarise(val = mean(val)) %>% 
  ggplot(aes(dim, val, group=Species, col=Species)) + 
    geom_line(size=2) + coord_polar()

enter image description here

A previous workaround for this no longer works. Anyone have any ideas for an updated workaround?

6
  • Hmm. For continuous axes I'd agree, but not necessarily for partially discrete space as here. It seems to me ggplot has enforced what should really be an aesthetic choice.
    – geotheory
    Mar 2 '17 at 17:51
  • ggradar is potentially useful however..
    – geotheory
    Mar 2 '17 at 17:53
  • 2
    Not really. It's interpolating an equally spaced sequence between your data points, just like in Cartesian space. To draw straight lines in polar space requires a varying slope. There's a bigger issue, though: line plots of non-ordered categorical data are misleading, regardless of the coordinate space.
    – alistaire
    Mar 2 '17 at 18:00
  • So you're saying parallel coordinates plots are inherently misleading? (I especially love the irony of the example used on that wikipedia page..)
    – geotheory
    Mar 3 '17 at 0:49
  • I'm not claiming they're pie charts (which also have a Wikipedia article), but to a certain extent, yes, due to the instinct to read graphs from left to right (for LTR language native speakers, anyway), which with parallel coordinates can imply causation despite arbitrary axis ordering. They can still be useful for visual clustering, though, and interactivity (the ability to switch axis order, brush, etc.) can improve them dramatically.
    – alistaire
    Mar 3 '17 at 4:59
6

A plot in polar coordinates with data points connected by straight lines is also called a radar plot.

There's an article by Erwan Le Pennec: From Parallel Plot to Radar Plot dealing with the issue to create a radar plot with ggplot2.

He suggests to use coord_radar() defined as:

coord_radar <- function (theta = "x", start = 0, direction = 1) {
  theta <- match.arg(theta, c("x", "y"))
  r <- if (theta == "x") "y" else "x"
  ggproto("CordRadar", CoordPolar, theta = theta, r = r, start = start, 
          direction = sign(direction),
          is_linear = function(coord) TRUE)
}

With this, we can create the plot as follows:

library(tidyr)
library(dplyr)
library(ggplot2)

iris %>% gather(dim, val, -Species) %>%
  group_by(dim, Species) %>% summarise(val = mean(val)) %>% 
  ggplot(aes(dim, val, group=Species, col=Species)) + 
  geom_line(size=2) + coord_radar()

enter image description here

coord_radar() is part of the ggiraphExtra package. So, you can use it directly

iris %>% gather(dim, val, -Species) %>%
      group_by(dim, Species) %>% summarise(val = mean(val)) %>% 
      ggplot(aes(dim, val, group=Species, col=Species)) + 
      geom_line(size=2) + ggiraphExtra:::coord_radar()

Note that coord_radar() is not exported by the package. So, the triple colon (:::) is required to access the function.

5
  • Top answer! Are you involved in ggiraphExtra by any chance?
    – geotheory
    Mar 3 '17 at 20:27
  • 1
    @geotheory I'm glad I found a solution. No, I'm not involved with ggiraphExtra. First, I googled for "straight lines coord_polar" and found Erwan Le Pennec's paper where credit was given to Hadley Wickham for coord_radar(). Then, I tried to find the reference to Hadley but I ended with the link to coord_radar() in the ggiraphExtra package on RDocumentation
    – Uwe
    Mar 3 '17 at 21:36
  • Just noticed that geom_polygon doesn't require this workaround. But this still very much required for lines/paths.
    – geotheory
    Mar 7 '17 at 21:38
  • Oops forgot to tick this!
    – geotheory
    Apr 29 '18 at 8:49
  • 1
    Creates issues with vline and hline though. Apr 8 '19 at 14:26

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