58

The Python docs say:

re.MULTILINE: When specified, the pattern character '^' matches at the beginning of the string and at the beginning of each line (immediately following each newline)... By default, '^' matches only at the beginning of the string...

So what's going on when I get the following unexpected result?

>>> import re
>>> s = """// The quick brown fox.
... // Jumped over the lazy dog."""
>>> re.sub('^//', '', s, re.MULTILINE)
' The quick brown fox.\n// Jumped over the lazy dog.'
118

Look at the definition of re.sub:

re.sub(pattern, repl, string[, count, flags])

The 4th argument is the count, you are using re.MULTILINE (which is 8) as the count, not as a flag.

Either use a named argument:

re.sub('^//', '', s, flags=re.MULTILINE)

Or compile the regex first:

re.sub(re.compile('^//', re.MULTILINE), '', s)
  • 7
    it would be better to have re.compile('^//', re.M).sub('', s) – SilentGhost Mar 25 '10 at 16:32
  • you don't have to compile it if you tell python the flag that you are passing it – pseudosudo Aug 30 '11 at 18:34
  • 5
    @pseudosudo the flags arguments was added in Python 2.7, which didn't exist when this answer was posted. I've added the information to the answer. – agf Aug 30 '11 at 18:43
10
re.sub('(?m)^//', '', s)
7

The full definition of re.sub is:

re.sub(pattern, repl, string[, count, flags])

Which means that if you tell Python what the parameters are, then you can pass flags without passing count:

re.sub('^//', '', s, flags=re.MULTILINE)

or, more concisely:

re.sub('^//', '', s, flags=re.M)
  • 1
    @agf Ah, I didn't think to look at the date. – pseudosudo Aug 30 '11 at 19:42

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