16

We can all agree on public variables being bad for encapsulation and all that. However, I noticed a lot of code that does this type of stuff:

class foo {
private:
    int integer_;
    string someString_;
    // other variables
public:
    int& integer() { return integer_; }
    string& someString() { return someString_; }
    // other "functions"
}

int main() {
    foo f;
    f.integer() = 10;
    f.someString() = "something";
    return 0;
}

I have seen this being used in many places and I don't get why. Basically it returns a reference to the data and thus exposes it directly to the outside. So encapsulation is not really achieved, not from any perspective.

Why is this commonly used?

11
  • 17
    "Why is this commonly used?" Because of common stupidity. Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:39
  • 12
    It's commonly used because many programmers don't really know what they are doing.
    – user2100815
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:39
  • So they basically think they are solving a problem while all they are doing is just adding verbosity into their code?
    – Everyone
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:40
  • It's bad as other commenters already said. Look here
    – mpiatek
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:40
  • 1
    Unfortunately common practice and best practice are not always the same. Btw I believe this is not common...
    – vadim
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:43

5 Answers 5

18

There's a recurring mantra, that getter/setter functions should be used to encapsulate your data. Hence many (unexperienced or coffee-overloaded) programmers get the idea they should use something like:

int& integer() { return integer_; }

but that isn't much different from simply writing:

class foo {
public: // <<<
    int integer_;
    string someString_;
    // ...
};

Well, it adds a function call, but you cannot control what the client does with the reference.


If you really want to provide a getter function write:

const int& integer() const { return integer_; }

A corresponding setter function looks like:

void integer(const int& value) {
    integer_ = value;
}
12
  • 1
    Yeah it just adds verbosity to the code that is unnecessary. Yet many use it. It just blows my mind :|
    – Everyone
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:45
  • Yeah, this is just like size() from std::vector
    – Everyone
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:48
  • 3
    Why would you not write: int integer() const { return integer_; }?
    – user2100815
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:49
  • 2
    @NeilButterworth The difference is minor and my example extrapolates well for other types than int (besides keeping tight to OP's example). Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:50
  • 1
    @Everyone It's more typing, more code to read, and it is probably less efficient. If you look at similar functions in the Standard Library, they return integer values.
    – user2100815
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:56
10

I have to partially disagree both with @πάνταῥεῖ and @Rakete1111 's answers, considering how a class's definition is something that may evolve over time.

While it's true that, often, these getter methods are written by someone who's just heard the "no exposing members" mantra, they can also have legitimate uses:

  1. The getter method may later be modified to include some kind of validity check or resource allocation code before returning the reference - which direct access to the data member does not allow. While this means changing the class's code, it does not require changing the class user code. Also, if the implementation of the getter is not exposed in the class header, it might not even require recompiling the class user code. Note: Doing so is probably a sign of some other poor design choice.
  2. The getter method may be overridden by a subclass (in which case it is often made a virtual method) in a similar way to the above.
  3. The getter method may later replace its return type with a proxy for the original data member type, rather than a reference to an actual member - which may no longer even exist. Think of how vector<bool> works; when you call its operator[] you don't get a boolean&, you get some kind of proxy which, when assigned or assigned-to, does the appropriate bit extraction or setting.
  4. A non-const getter is not usable for non-const instances. So actually it does limit access relative to exposing the member outright. Whether the author of OP's example class actually intended this is a different question...

To sum up: The "dummy" non-const-reference getter can be a stub for other, meaningful, code.

That being said, it is often a good idea to just make the getter return a const reference or a value. Or just exposing the field in those cases where it's appropriate (and there are some of those too).

8
  • It really makes some sense what you are talking. I do realize C++ does not have C#'s properties which actually help controlling all these stuff easily and as you've said without the need to change user code. But again, comparing two different languages is not really valid
    – Everyone
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 20:01
  • Ever heard of YAGNI?
    – user2100815
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 20:02
  • 2
    @NeilButterworth: (1) Yes, but - obligatory link for those who havent. (2) I may not going to need it, but who knows what the author of that code is going to need?
    – einpoklum
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 20:04
  • (3) If you're designing an inheritance hierarchy, you may already need it (or at least - have use for it). (4) I've never actually written such getters myself :-)
    – einpoklum
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 20:05
  • @ein "The getter method may later be modified to include some kind of validity check" Exactly that isn't possible exposing a non const reference! Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 20:06
5

I would strongly discouraged returning a non-const reference to a private variable. Not because it breaks encapsulation, but because it is unnecessary: Why not make the variable public in the first place?

Breaking encapsulation is bad, yes, but that does not mean that every variable should be private. Some variables are meant to be read and modified from the user, so it would make sense to make them public. For example, take std::pair, it has 2 public member variables, first and second. That's not bad practice.

The only time it doesn't make sense is when the variable is not supposed to be written to. That would be bad, as it would actually break encapsulation and make the whole program hard to debug.

14
  • 1
    std::pair doesn't have any behaviour though - if your class has behaviour, then public data is fatal
    – user2100815
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:45
  • @NeilButterworth Why? What's the difference?
    – Rakete1111
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:45
  • Exactly as @NeilButterworth said, pair has no behavior. It is just container for data. So this is the best way of doing stuff? Having containers different from actors? Other than the case of when you need friend
    – Everyone
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:47
  • Well, if you have a class with behaviour, such as std::string, what happens if you can gaily change the variables implementing the class? What happens with std::string if you directly change the pointer pointing to storage for the string?
    – user2100815
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:47
  • @NeilButterworth The pointer is not meant to be modified, so it has to be private, yes. I never said that it makes sense for every variable, but sometimes, it does. Maybe you have a Window class where the width and the height are public, to be modified and read. Then, the next time the main loop reads the width and height, and modifies the window accordingly
    – Rakete1111
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 19:49
3

This construction may be used for debugging purposes.

If you have a public variable, you can't monitor its usage easily. Converting it to a pair of private variable and method-returning reference will allow you to put a breakpoint and/or log the calls.

However, separate getter and setter would serve the same purpose even better, so this is just an advantage over plain public variables.

2

I wrote this once. I planned later to go back and replace the field getter with something that returned a stack object to something that could be cast to the original type and assigned to by the original type. This allowed me to go back later and intercept all assignments to put validations in.

Kinda overpowered techinque. None of the other coders on the project could understand it at all. The whole stack got ripped out.

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