I compiled the following program:

#include <stdint.h>

uint64_t usquare(uint32_t x) {
  return (uint64_t)x * (uint64_t)x;
}

This disassembles to:

 0: 89 f8                   mov    eax,edi
 2: 48 0f af c0             imul   rax,rax
 6: c3                      ret  

But imul is the instruction for multiplying signed numbers. Why is it used by gcc then?

/edit: when using uint64_t the assembly is similar:

0:  48 0f af ff             imul   rdi,rdi
4:  48 89 f8                mov    rax,rdi
7:  c3                      ret  
  • I assume this is for x86? – old_timer Mar 3 '17 at 20:14
  • Yes, I could have chosen better tags :) – marmistrz Mar 3 '17 at 20:16
  • 2
    Two-operand imul only returns the lower half of the product, so signedness is not a concern. – harold Mar 3 '17 at 20:16
  • Which bit is the sign bit? – marmistrz Mar 3 '17 at 20:31
  • The most significant bit, which would have a weight of -2^(k-1) instead of +2^(k-1) – harold Mar 3 '17 at 21:04
up vote 10 down vote accepted

WARNING This answer is long!

... and it's full of unneeded explanations - but I have always wanted to write something more lengthy about the multiplication.

A bit of theory

When multiplying two number a and b of length n the result is of length 2 n and, most importantly, the k-th digit only depends on the lowest k digits (a proof is given in Appendix A).

The x86 imul's two forms

The x86 multiplication instruction imul comes in two form: the full form and the partial form.

The first form is of the kind n×n→2 n, meaning that it produces a result twice the size of the operands - we know from the theory why this makes sense.
For example

imul ax         ;16x16->32, Result is dx:ax
imul rax        ;64x64->128, Result is rdx:rax 

The second form is of the kind n×nn, this necessarily cut out some information.
Particularly, this form takes only the lower n bits of the result.

imul ax, ax          ;16x16->16, Lower WORD of the result is ax
imul rax, rax        ;64x64->64, Lower QWORD of the result is rax 

Only the single operand version is of the first form.

The two instructions: imul vs mul

Regardless of the form used, the processor always calculates the result with a size twice the operands' (i.e. like the first form).
In order to be able to do that, the operands are first converted from their size n to size 2 n (e.g. from 64 to 128 bits).
See Appendix B for more on this.

The multiplication is done and the full, or partial, result is stored in the destination.

The difference between imul and mul is in how the operands are converted.
Since the size is extended, this particular type of conversion is called extension.

The mul instruction simply fills the upper part with zeros - it zero extends.
The imul instruction replicate the high-order bit (the first from the left) - this is called sign extension and it has the interesting property of transforming a two's complement signed number of n bits into a signed number of 2 n bits with the same sign and modulus (i.e. it does the right thing, it is left to the reader to found a counter-example for the zero-extension case).

     How mul extends              How imul extends       
       and operand                  and operand

     +----+       +----+          +----+       +----+
     |0...|       |1...|          |0...|       |1...|
     +----+       +----+          +----+       +----+  

+----+----+  +----+----+     +----+----+  +----+----+
|0000|0...|  |0000|1...|     |0000|0...|  |1111|1...|
+----+----+  +----+----+     +----+----+  +----+----+

The thesis

The difference between imul and mul is noticeable only from the (n+1)-th bit onward.
For a 32-bit operand, it means that only the upper 32-bit part of the full result will eventually be different.

This is easy to see as the lower n bits are the same for both instructions and as we know from the theory the first n bits of the result only depends on the first n bits of the operands.

Thus the thesis: The result of the partial form of imul is identical to that of mul.

Then why imul exits?
Because it's more flexible - it has two or three operands while mul has a very ancient interface.
Because it sets the flags according to a signed multiplication - CF and OF are set if the partial result has discarded any significant information (the technical condition being: the sign extension of the partial result is different from the full result) such in case of overflow.
This is also why the two and three operand forms are not called mul, which otherwise would have been a perfectly fit name.

The practice

To test all this in practice we can ask a compiler[live] for the assembly of the following program

#include <stdint.h>

uint64_t foo(uint32_t a)
{
    return a*(uint64_t)a;
}

While we know that for 64-bit target the code generated uses imul because a unint64_t fits a register and thus a 64×64→64 multiplication is available as imul <reg64>, <reg64>

foo(unsigned int):
        mov     eax, edi        ;edi = a
        imul    rax, rax        ;64x64->64
        ret

in 32-bit code there is no such multiplication using imul.
A imul <reg32> or imul <reg32>, <reg32>, <reg32> is necessary but that would produce a full result! And a full signed result is not generally equal to a full unsigned result.
Infact, the compiler reverts back to mul:

foo(unsigned int):
        mov     eax, DWORD PTR [esp+4]
        mul     eax
        ret

Appendix A

Without loss of generality, we can assume base 2 and that the numbers are n + 1 bits long (so that the indices run from 0 to n) - then

c = a·b = ∑i=0..n (ai·2i) · ∑j=0..n(bj·2j) = ∑i=0..n [ai·∑j=0..n (bj·2i+j)] (by the distributive property)

we see that the k-th digit of the result is the sum of all the addends such that i + j = k plus an eventual carry

ck = ∑i,j=0..n; i+j=k ai·bj·2i+j + Ck

The term Ck is the curry and, as it propagates towards higher bits, it depends only on the lower bits.
The second term cannot have a ai or bj with i or j > k as if the first were true then i = k + e, for a positive, non null, e and thus j = k - i = k - k -e = -e
But j cannot be negative!
The second case is similar and left to the reader.

Appendix B

As BeeOnRope pointed out in the comments the processor probably doesn't compute a full result if only the partial result is needed.

You probably means that this is only a way of thinking about it, conceptually. The processor does not necessarily do a full 128-bit multiplication when you use the 64x64 -> 64 form. Indeed, the truncated form takes only 1 uop on recent Intel, but the full form takes 2 uops, so some extra work is being done

Comment from BeeOnRope

Also, the sign extension is probably conceptually too

Similarly the sign extension may happens "conceptually", but probably not in hardware. They won't have the extra wires and transistors just to do the sign or zero extension, which would add a lot of bulk to an already huge multiplier, but will use some other tricks to do the multiplication "as if" that had happened.

Comment from BeeOnRope


Binary numbers of length n are in the order of magnitude of 2n, thus the multiplication of two such numbers is in the order of magnitude 2n · 2n = 2n+n = 22 n. Just like a number of length 2 n.

  • Great answer! I think you might want to clarify when you say things like Regardless of the form used, the processor always calculates the result with a size twice the operands' (i.e. like the first form) you probably means that this is only a way of thinking about it, conceptually. The processor does not necessarily do a full 128-bit multiplication when you use the 64x64 -> 64 form. Indeed, the truncated form takes only 1 uop on recent Intel, but the full form takes 2 uops, so some extra work is being done. – BeeOnRope Mar 6 '17 at 15:46
  • Similarly the sign extension may happens "conceptually", but probably not in hardware. They won't have the extra wires and transistors just to do the sign or zero extension, which would add a lot of bulk to an already huge multiplier, but will use some other tricks to do the multiplication "as if" that had happened. – BeeOnRope Mar 6 '17 at 15:47
  • @BeeOnRope Good point! I'll quote your comments verbatim if you don't mind :) – Margaret Bloom Mar 6 '17 at 16:05
  • 1
    Sure, go right ahead! – BeeOnRope Mar 6 '17 at 16:19
#include <stdint.h>

uint64_t fun0 ( uint32_t x )
{
    return (uint64_t)x * (uint64_t)x;
}
uint64_t fun1 ( uint32_t x )
{
    return ((uint64_t)x) * ((uint64_t)x);
}
uint64_t fun2 ( uint64_t x )
{
    return (x * x);
}



0000000000000000 <fun0>:
   0:   89 f8                   mov    %edi,%eax
   2:   48 0f af c0             imul   %rax,%rax
   6:   c3                      retq   
   7:   66 0f 1f 84 00 00 00    nopw   0x0(%rax,%rax,1)
   e:   00 00 

0000000000000010 <fun1>:
  10:   89 f8                   mov    %edi,%eax
  12:   48 0f af c0             imul   %rax,%rax
  16:   c3                      retq   
  17:   66 0f 1f 84 00 00 00    nopw   0x0(%rax,%rax,1)
  1e:   00 00 

0000000000000020 <fun2>:
  20:   48 89 f8                mov    %rdi,%rax
  23:   48 0f af c7             imul   %rdi,%rax
  27:   c3                      retq   

EDIT

even if you specify all 64 bit unsigned it generates the same result

0x00FF * 0x00FF = 0xFE01
0xFFFF * 0xFFFF = 0xFFFE0001
so
0xFF * 0xFF = 0x01

sign extension doesnt matter for the lower 64 bits so you can use imul for 8, 16, 32 and 64 bit operands signed or unsigned.

  • based on what harold is saying fun2 is a 32 bit multiply as well instead of a 64 bit? – old_timer Mar 3 '17 at 20:28
  • But fun2 uses imul too, but takes an unsigned integer – marmistrz Mar 3 '17 at 20:29
  • No I meant it's 64x64->64 as opposed to 64x64->128. Signedness only affects the upper half of the 128 bit product – harold Mar 3 '17 at 20:30
  • ahh, I see...... – old_timer Mar 3 '17 at 20:30

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