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I have a application that is comparable with a to-do app. There are several pending tasks assigned to a single user at any given time. Some users have almost 2500 tasks pending and some have only 2.

It seems that the datastore query takes far too long when the results matching the query are lower than the limit applied on the query. Example:

Scenario 1:

User A: Has 2500 pending tasks. The query limit is 500 and results fetched on the first request are obviously 500. Time taken: 5767 milliseconds (5.7 seconds).

User B: Has 2 pending tasks. The query limit is 500 and results fetched on the first request are obviously 2. Time taken: 7124 milliseconds (7.1 seconds).

Scenario 2:

User A: Has 2500 pending tasks. The query limit is 10 and results fetched on the first request are obviously 10. Time taken: ~400 milliseconds (1/2 second).

User B: Has 2 pending tasks. The query limit is 10 and results fetched on the first request are obviously 2. Time taken: 5-6 seconds.

Scenario 3:

User A: Has 2500 pending tasks. The query limit is 500 and results fetched on the first request are obviously 500. Time taken: 6244 milliseconds (6 seconds).

User C: Has 551 pending tasks. The query limit is 500 and results fetched on the first request are obviously 500. Time taken: 13579 milliseconds (13 seconds).

My code:

public static Map <String , Object> getEntitiesUsingQueryCursor( String kind , int limit , int chunkSize , String currentCursor, String account, String user, Boolean status, String dept ) throws Exception
        {

            String nextCursor = null;

            Entity entity = null;

            List <Entity> listOfEntity = new ArrayList <Entity>();

            Map <String , Object> result = new HashMap <String , Object>();


            DatastoreService datastore = DatastoreServiceFactory.getDatastoreService();
            com.google.appengine.api.datastore.Query q = new com.google.appengine.api.datastore.Query( kind );

List <Filter> listOfFilter = new ArrayList <Filter>();
Filter filter1 = new FilterPredicate( "account" , FilterOperator.EQUAL ,  account);
Filter filter2 = new FilterPredicate( "user" , FilterOperator.EQUAL ,  user);
Filter filter3 = new FilterPredicate( "dept" , FilterOperator.EQUAL ,  dept);
Filter filter4 = new FilterPredicate( "status" , FilterOperator.EQUAL ,  status); //Boolean
listOfFilter.add( filter1 );
listOfFilter.add( filter2 );
listOfFilter.add( filter3 );
listOfFilter.add( filter4 );
Filter filterParams1 = filterParams = CompositeFilterOperator.and( listOfFilter );
q.setFilter( filter );

            PreparedQuery pq = datastore.prepare( q );
            FetchOptions fetchOptions = FetchOptions.Builder.withLimit(limit).prefetchSize( chunkSize ).chunkSize( chunkSize );

            if ( !StringUtil.isBlank( currentCursor ) )
                fetchOptions.startCursor( Cursor.fromWebSafeString( currentCursor ) );

            QueryResultIterable <Entity> results = pq.asQueryResultIterable( fetchOptions );
            QueryResultIterator <Entity> iterator = results.iterator();

            while ( iterator.hasNext() )
                {
                    entity = iterator.next();
                    listOfEntity.add( entity );
                }

            if(listOfEntity.size() == limit)
                nextCursor = iterator.getCursor().toWebSafeString();

            result.put( "cursor" , nextCursor );
            result.put( "entity" , listOfEntity );

            return result;
        }

Is this how datastore queries work? Can someone suggest a better way to query entities? If I set an average limit of 50 on the query, the users who have less than 50 pending tasks have to wait at least 7 seconds before they get their tasks on the page. The 7 second time applies even if I set the limit to 10 and the user has only 2 pending tasks.

  • At a guess, your query has to scan one index for each filter. Have a look at cloud.google.com/appengine/articles/indexselection#Performance to see how indexes can affect query performance. – snakecharmerb Mar 4 '17 at 11:25
  • @snakecharmerb When the query limit is 10 and the results that would match the filters are more than 2500, the latency is 400 milliseconds. If I apply the same query and the results that match the filters are 2 (less than limit 10), the time taken is 5-6 seconds. Is it really about the indexes? – Kumar Mar 4 '17 at 13:12
  • It could be. Consider: with limit 10 and 2500+ matches in the datastore, the query engine can stop the query once it has found 10 matches. With limit 10 and 2 matches in the datastore, the query engine will read every record that could possibly be a match before returning. So a query with a limit greater than the number of matches is guaranteed to have worst-case performance. Then the question becomes, how can this be mitigated? and one possible answer is crafting indexes to maximise performance in the worst case. Another answer is to remove the limit, but I assume that's not an option. – snakecharmerb Mar 4 '17 at 14:20
  • @snakecharmerb thanks, let me look at the docs and get back to you – Kumar Mar 4 '17 at 14:27
  • @snakecharmerb Pardon me if this sounds silly, but my query has no sort order. I only have 4 "equals" filters and this doesn't require any indexes at all, do existing indexes added for other queries affect my result? – Kumar Mar 4 '17 at 15:11
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If you define a composite index on account,user,dept,status answering the above query will only require a linear scan of a single index which should improve the query speed greatly (regardless of limits).

To illustrate, suppose you had [row] [account, user, dept, status] [entity] 1] A B C D e1 2] A B E F e2 3] A B E F e3 4] A F A A e4 5] B A Z E e5 The query for 'A B E F' would find row [2] and then linear scan to [3] returning [e1, e2]. It would stop at [4] (the first row that doesn't match) having done very little work.

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