1

Here's the situation. I have a base class declared in a header file with a few protected data members and a few public getter functions (one-line body). There are no virtual methods. A subclass is derived from it, and defines its own constructor, whose definition is placed in the corresponding cpp file.

Will calls to the getter functions through an object of the derived class be inlined?

EDIT: Here's my code.

// quad.h
class QuadratureRule {
protected:
  int ngauss;
  Array points;
  Array weights;
public:
  QuadratureRule(int ng) : ngauss(ng) { }
  double getweights(int ig) const {
    return weights[ig];
  }
};
class Quadrature2D : public QuadratureRule {
public:
  Quadrature2D(int ng);
};

And

//quad.cpp
#include "quad.h"
Quadrature2D::Quadrature2D(int ng) : QuadratureRule(ng) {
  // initialize arrays in a certain way
}

I want getweights inlined when called by an object of class Quadrature2D. Also, I am using GCC g++ 5.4 and 6.3.

  • 2
    While your question may be clear, Code speaks volumes. Can you provide code demonstration? – WhiZTiM Mar 4 '17 at 20:30
  • 3
    Most likely, yes. The only way to be sure is to examine the generated code. (There is no case where C++ requires function inlining; it's up to the implementation.) – molbdnilo Mar 4 '17 at 20:38
  • There is no reason why it shouldn't inline your code, in this regard your situation is nothing special compared to other functions. But nevertheless, there is no guarantee a function will be inlined. Just check your assembly to be sure. – overseas Mar 4 '17 at 20:41
0

EDIT:

I've been checking it more and it seems that if you turn on optimizations it actually will be inlined. But as people already said in the comments, it really depends on the implementation. Examples:

Code without optimizations

Code with optimizations


You got me curious so I checked it up. This is my program:

// base.h
include <iostream>

class Base {
    int x;
    int y;
public:
    Base(int x = 0, int y = 0) : x(x), y(y) {}
    int getx() const { return x; }
    void setx(int x) { this->x = x; }
    int gety() const { return y; }
    void sety(int y) { this->y = y; }
};

And:

// derived.cpp
#include "base.h"

class Derived : public Base {
    int z;
public:
    Derived(int x = 0, int y = 0, int z = 0) : Base(x, y), z(z) {}
};

using namespace std;

int main() {
    Derived d(1, 2, 3);
    cout << "d.x == " << d.getx() << ", d.y == " << d.gety() << endl;
    d.setx(4);
    d.sety(4);
    cout << "d.x == " << d.getx() << ", d.y == " << d.gety() << endl;
    return 0;
}

Compiled on gcc 6.3 with:

g++ -Wall -Werror -g -pedantic-errors -o derived derived.cpp

Here's a part of the objdump, inside main():

a2b:   e8 1a 01 00 00          call   b4a <_ZN4Base4setxEi> ; A call to setx()
a30:   48 8d 45 e0             lea    rax,[rbp-0x20]
a34:   be 04 00 00 00          mov    esi,0x4
a39:   48 89 c7                mov    rdi,rax
a3c:   e8 33 01 00 00          call   b74 <_ZN4Base4setyEi> ; A call to sety()
a41:   48 8d 45 e0             lea    rax,[rbp-0x20]
a45:   48 89 c7                mov    rdi,rax
a48:   e8 15 01 00 00          call   b62 <_ZNK4Base4getyEv> ; A call to gety()
a4d:   89 c3                   mov    ebx,eax
a4f:   48 8d 45 e0             lea    rax,[rbp-0x20]
a53:   48 89 c7                mov    rdi,rax
a56:   e8 df 00 00 00          call   b3a <_ZNK4Base4getxEv> ; A call to getx()

Assuming I didn't overlook anything important, I guess you can't trust your code to be inlined.

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