4

I am attempting this technique:

class Pet {}

class Dog: Pet {}

class House {
    func getPets() -> [Pet] {
        return [Pet]()
    }
}

class DogHouse: House {
    override func getPets() -> [Dog] {
        return [Dog]()
    }
}

The DogHouse class overrides the House getPets method in a way that strictly meets the API requirement of House getPets.

However, Swift does not appreciate that [Dog] isa [Pet] and it produces the error Method does not override any method from its superclass.

Is there any way for a subclass to implement API with more generic inputs or more restrictive outputs than its superclass?

  • Have I answered your question? – Alexander - Reinstate Monica Mar 6 '17 at 7:37
  • There's no real reason why this shouldn't be possible – the Swift compiler can specially deal with conversions between arrays of subtypes to arrays of supertypes. This just seems to be an edge case due to the fact that Array is generic and therefore seen by the compiler to be invariant (which generics are), even though it can work some magic to make it appear covariant in most places (see for example this Q&A). See also this related bug report. – Hamish Mar 6 '17 at 8:11
5

To answer the question officially asked: Yes, Swift allows more "restricted" return types in return types. This property is formally called return type Covariance. Consider this example, which is compilable Swift code:

class Pet {}

class Dog: Pet {}

class House {
    func getPets() -> Pet {
        return Pet()
    }
}

class DogHouse: House {
    override func getPets() -> Dog {
        return Dog()
    }
}

However, the issue here is that Array<Dog> is not a "more restricted" type than Array<Pet>, and conversely, Array<Pet> is not a generalization of Array<Dog>. Formally, Array<Dog> is not a covariant of Array<Pet>.

To illustrate why that is, consider this example:

class House<T> {
    var occupants = [T]()

    func addOccupant(_ o: T) {
        occupants.append(o)
    }
}

class Pet {}
class Dog: Pet {}
class Cat: Pet {}

class PetHouseBuilder {
    func buildHouse() -> House<Pet> {
        return House()
    }
}

class DogHouseBuilder: PetHouseBuilder {
    // Suppose this were legal
    override func buildHouse() -> House<Dog> {
        return House()
    }
}

// The concrete return type of the object is `House<Dog>`, but
// `PetHouseBuilder.buildHouse` has a static return type of `House<Pet>`,
// so `petHouse` will have an inferred static type of `House<Pet>`
let petHouse = PetHouseBuilder().buildHouse()

let vulnerableLittle🐱 = Cat()
petHouse.addOccupant(vulnerableLittle🐱)
// Oh boy, now there's a kitten in the dog house ☠️
|improve this answer|||||
  • @Hamish Good point. I had converted this idea over from Java, where I had originally seen it, but the value semantics of array invalidate it. – Alexander - Reinstate Monica Mar 6 '17 at 8:19
  • @Hamish Can you think of a better example? – Alexander - Reinstate Monica Mar 6 '17 at 8:20
  • I'm afraid not (I think OP's code should compile) – to just show why generics are invariant, you'll have to involve a generic reference type (but this logic can be applied to arbitrary generic value types as well, as they can contain any number of generic reference types themselves – just not to Array specifically, as it has copy on write value semantics). – Hamish Mar 6 '17 at 8:33
  • @Hamish I think I've got a working example, that relies on a generic reference-type – Alexander - Reinstate Monica Mar 6 '17 at 8:44
  • Yeah, that works (or should I say "doesn't work" :P). Although it doesn't prove that OP's code shouldn't compile, just that arbitrary generic types shouldn't be allowed to be covariant (Array can safely be an exception to this rule due to its value semantics). – Hamish Mar 6 '17 at 8:55
0

@Alexander

Hi, probably you know, why your example not works with protocols?

protocol IPet {}

protocol IDog: IPet {}

class Pet: IPet {}

class Dog: Pet, IDog {}

class House {
    func getPets() -> IPet {
        return Pet()
    }
}

class DogHouse: House {
    override func getPets() -> IDog //Method does not override any method from its superclass
    { 
        return Dog()
    }
}

Thanks.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.