1

I have a css:

.form-group input[type=checkbox]:not(.form-group div.checkbox input[type=checkbox]) {
    margin-top: 10px;
}

Which aims to have a margin-top for those checkbox without div.checkbox
but I want to use default css for those checkboxes inside div.checkbox

However, I got this warning when I check the css, what is the proper way to do this? thanks.

  • Where you got this warning – Sankar Mar 6 '17 at 6:28
  • @SankarRaj I'm using VS2015, if used online validator, it will return "Disallow overqualified elements" and "parseError" – Prisoner Mar 6 '17 at 7:06
  • @Harry Thanks for the info, do you know any workaround? – Prisoner Mar 6 '17 at 7:10
  • @Prisoner: The :not() selector is always tricky to implement. Please include your HTML structure also in the question because the working of :not() is heavily dependant on the exact structure. Else, I'd suggest writing the CSS for all checkboxes generically and then overriding for those within the div.checkbox. – Harry Mar 6 '17 at 7:13
1

The below won't work because the CSS :not() selector takes only simple selectors as argument and as per the W3C Specs, a simple selector is either a type selector, universal selector, attribute selector, class selector, ID selector, or pseudo-class.

.form-group input[type=checkbox]:not(.form-group div.checkbox input[type=checkbox]) {
    margin-top: 10px;
}

The argument that is used in the above selector is a sequence or chain of simple selectors.


The negation pseudo-class selector is in my opinion the most complex CSS selector to employ and it gets extremely messy if even one element which doesn't respect the rule is introduced somewhere in the middle. For example, a selector div:not(.checkbox) input[type=checkbox] will exclude only the second checkbox in the below structure.

div:not(.checkbox) input[type=checkbox] {
  margin-top: 10px;
  outline: 2px solid red;
}
<div class='something-else'>
  <input type='checkbox' />
</div>
<div class='checkbox'>
  <input type='checkbox' />
</div>
<div class='checkbox'>
  <div class='something-else'>
    <input type='checkbox' />
  </div>
</div>
<div class='something-else'>
  <div class='checkbox'>
    <input type='checkbox' />
  </div>
</div>

You may have expected the last two checkboxes to also have been excluded because they have one div.checkbox ancestor above them but that doesn't happen because they also happen to have 1 non div.checkbox ancestor which is making the element get matched. This is why it becomes complex to use this selector.


If your HTML structure is something like the one in the below snippet then you could use combination of direct-child selectors along with the negation pseudo-class to style only checkboxes that aren't part of a div.checkbox ancestor.

.form-group > div:not(.checkbox) input[type=checkbox],
.form-group > input[type=checkbox] {
  margin-top: 10px;
  outline: 2px solid red;
}
<form class='form-group'>
  <input type='checkbox' />
  <div class='checkbox'>
    <input type='checkbox' />
  </div>
  <div class='not-checkbox'>
    <input type='checkbox' />
  </div>
  <div class='checkbox'>
    <div class='something-else'>
      <input type='checkbox' />
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class='not-checkbox'>
    <div class='something-else'>
      <input type='checkbox' />
    </div>
  </div>  
</form>


Or else, you could write the rules for all checkboxes generically and then override for those which are present within the div.checkbox.

.form-group input[type=checkbox] {
  margin-top: 10px;
  outline: 2px solid red;
}
.form-group div.checkbox input[type=checkbox] {
  margin-top: 0px;
  outline: none;
}
<form class='form-group'>
  <input type='checkbox' />
  <div class='checkbox'>
    <input type='checkbox' />
  </div>
  <div class='not-checkbox'>
    <input type='checkbox' />
  </div>
  <div class='checkbox'>
    <div class='something-else'>
      <input type='checkbox' />
    </div>
  </div>
  <div class='not-checkbox'>
    <div class='something-else'>
      <input type='checkbox' />
    </div>
  </div>  
</form>

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