24

Say I have a simple template like this:

template<typename T>
class A {};

And I want to specify that the type-parameter T is of some unrelated type X<U> where U is not known (or unspecifyable).

Is there a way how to express that as a concept?

30

Is there a way how to express that as a concept?

You don't need a concept, class template specialization works just fine in your case.
As an example, you can do this:

template<typename T>
class A;

template<typename U>
class A<X<U>> { /* ... */ };

This way, unless A is instantiated with a type of the form X<U> (where U is unknown), you'll get a compile-time error because the primary template isn't defined. In other terms, it won't work for all the types but X<U> (for each U), where the latter matches the class template specialization that has a proper definition.

Note that I assumed X is a known type. That's not clear from your question.
Anyway, if it's not and you want to accept types of the form X<U> for each X and each U, you can still do this:

template<typename T>
class A;

template<template<typename> class X, typename U>
class A<X<U>> { /* ... */ };

As a minimal, working example:

template<typename>
struct S {};

template<typename>
class A;

template<typename U>
class A<S<U>> {};

int main() {
    A<S<int>> aSInt;
    A<S<double>> aSDouble;
    // A<char> aChar;
}

Both A<S<int>> and A<S<double>> are fine and the example compiles. If you toggle the comment, it won't compile anymore for A<char> isn't defined at all.


As a side note, if you don't want to use class template specialization and you want to simulate concepts (remember that they are not part of the standard yet and they won't be at least until 2020), you can do something like this:

#include<type_traits>

template<typename>
struct X {};

template<typename>
struct is_xu: std::false_type {};

template<typename U>
struct is_xu<X<U>>: std::true_type {};

template<typename T>
struct A {
    static_assert(is_xu<T>::value, "!");
    // ...
};

int main() {
    A<X<int>> aXInt;
    A<X<double>> aXDouble;
    // A<char> aChar;
}

That is, given a generic type T, static assert its actual type by means of another structure (is_xu in the example) that verifies if T is of the form X<U> (for each U) or not.


My two cents: the class template specialization is easier to read and understand at a glance.

  • This does not actually answer the question – Cubbi Mar 6 '17 at 14:01
  • @Cubbi Good. So I can't actually improve it. – skypjack Mar 6 '17 at 14:02
11
template <typename T, template <typename> class C>
concept bool Template = requires (T t) { {t} -> C<auto>; };

Now given a class template:

template <typename T>
struct X {};

a type template parameter can be constrained using:

template <typename T> requires Template<T, X>
class A {};

or:

template <Template<X> T>
class A {};

DEMO

This will work also for types derived from X<U>.

  • 1
    I would mention that it requires C++2x or later (unfortunately). That being said, is there a good resource to go a bit deeper on concepts that you can suggest? Thank you. – skypjack Mar 6 '17 at 8:44
  • 1
    It just need a compiler that support the concept TS. Clang frontend will soon have it implemented, so Visual Studio will have it too. @PiotrSkotnicki, If you had inverted the template argument of the concept, you could have declared template<Template<X> T> class A{} – Oliv Mar 6 '17 at 10:23
  • @Oliv You are right, but I suspect OP wants a solution that works today, not soon. ;-) ... Anyway, I like this answer, do not misunderstand me. – skypjack Mar 6 '17 at 10:29
  • 2
    @skypjack If you are interested in concept, here is a list of source I have used to learn to use it: [en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/constraints ], Strousturp guide [stroustrup.com/good_concepts.pdf ], and the normative papers (reading it cleaned some misconception I had!) [open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2016/n4630.pdf ] – Oliv Mar 6 '17 at 10:55
  • 2
    @dyp gcc implemented this auto type deduction in template parameter, and it surprisingly works... It seems that auto is a very special concept that can admit either a type or a value depending on the context... – Oliv Mar 6 '17 at 12:34

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