9

I have two classes like so.

class Stuff {
  constructor() { }
  things: Thing[] = [];
  name: string;
}

class Thing {
  constructor() { }
  active: boolean;
}

I tried to declare a field in my application like this.

blopp: Stuff[] = [
  {name: "aa", things: null}, 
  {name: "bb", things: null}];

The above approach works just fine. However, when I try to provide an array of things, instead of null, I get the error that it's not assignable the the type specified.

blopp: Stuff[] = [
  {name: "aa", things: [{active: true}, {active: false}]}, 
  {name: "bb", things: null}];
2
  • Actually looks good to me: typescriptlang.org/play/…
    – deceze
    Commented Mar 6, 2017 at 9:07
  • @deceze Not sure what to tell you. I got an error message. However, following the suggestion from the accepted answer made the trick. Perhaps mine IDE is more naggy (or yours not naggy enough). Not proficient with TS enough to pass judgment. Commented Mar 6, 2017 at 13:46

3 Answers 3

11

You should be using the new keyword to instantiate your objects:

class Stuff {
    constructor(public name: string, public things: Thing[] = []) { }
}

class Thing {
    constructor(public active: boolean) {

    };
}

var blopp: Stuff[] = [
    new Stuff("aa", [new Thing(true), new Thing(false)]),
    new Stuff("bb", null)
];

Or simply use interfaces:

interface IThing {
    active: boolean
}

interface IStuff {
    name: string;
    things: IThing[]
}

var blopp: IStuff[] = [
    { name: "aa", things: [{ active: true }, { active: false }] },
    { name: "bb", things: null }];

It is important to determine if you need classes or interface as some things will not work with anonymous objects:

/*
class Stuff {
	constructor(public name: string, public things: Thing[] = []) { }
}
class Thing {
	constructor(public active: boolean) {

	};
}
var blopp: Stuff[] = [
	{ name: "aa", things: [{ active: true }, { active: false }] },
	new Stuff("bb", null)
];
console.log("Is blopp[0] Stuff:", blopp[0] instanceof Stuff);
console.log("Is blopp[1] Stuff:", blopp[1] instanceof Stuff);

*/
var Stuff = (function () {
    function Stuff(name, things) {
        if (things === void 0) { things = []; }
        this.name = name;
        this.things = things;
    }
    return Stuff;
}());
var Thing = (function () {
    function Thing(active) {
        this.active = active;
    }
    ;
    return Thing;
}());
var blopp = [
    { name: "aa", things: [{ active: true }, { active: false }] },
    new Stuff("bb", null)
];
console.log("Is blopp[0] Stuff:", blopp[0] instanceof Stuff);
console.log("Is blopp[1] Stuff:", blopp[1] instanceof Stuff);

4
  • It feels super weird to talk interface in JavaScript. I'm still getting used to the concept of class. (I've been doing OO in C# for over 15 years but in JS it seems to exotic...) Would you say that classes are more appropriate or widely used in a general case? I can't judge... Commented Mar 6, 2017 at 13:48
  • 1
    Typescript works best with classes, as that is its intended use. Interfaces are good if you need to couple some JavaScript to your Typescript. Commented Mar 6, 2017 at 15:15
  • Is it fine if array of thing (things: Thing[]) created insdie stuff constructor by just looping??
    – ksh
    Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 6:50
  • @ksh It should be yes. It's a little difficult to answer without seeing a code example. You could submit a question if you like? Commented Aug 6, 2019 at 7:12
3

try to use <> or the as keyword for casting:

blopp: Stuff[] = [
  {name: "aa", things: [{active: true} as Thing , {active: false}as Thing]}, 
  {name: "bb", things: null}];
}

or

blopp: Stuff[] = [
  {name: "aa", things: [<Thing>{active: true}  , <Thing>{active: false}]}, 
  {name: "bb", things: null}];
}
1
  • How would you say that your suggestion compares to the constructor based as proposed by Emil above in the other reply? I need more feed-back to take an informed decision. :) Commented Mar 6, 2017 at 13:50
1

Further to the accepted answer which is of course correct, if you do want to use interfaces you can define interfaces to go within interfaces like this:

interface IFurniture {
  name: string
  legs: number
}

interface IRoom {
  name: string
  furniture: IFurniture[]
}

interface IHouse {
  rooms: IRoom[]
}

And if you don't don't need the nested parts’ types to be named you can nest the interface definitions:

interface IHouse {
  rooms: {
    name: string
    furniture: {
      name: string
      legs: number
    }[]
  }[]
}

Either of these ways of defining the IHouse interface will strictly type a house definition like below:

let house: IHouse = {
  rooms: [
    {
      name: "kitchen",
      furniture: [
        { 
          name: "chair",
          legs: 4
        },
        { 
          name: "stool",
          legs: 3
        }
      ]
    },
    {
      name: "bedroom",
      furniture: []
    }
  ]
}

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