169

Context

In Vue 2.0 the documentation and others clearly indicate that communication from parent to child happens via props.

Question

How does a parent tell its child an event has happened via props?

Should I just watch a prop called event? That doesn't feel right, nor do alternatives ($emit/$on is for child to parent, and a hub model is for distant elements).

Example

I have a parent container and it needs to tell its child container that it's okay to engage certain actions on an API. I need to be able to trigger functions.

240

Give the child component a ref and use $refs to call a method on the child component directly.

html:

<div id="app">
  <child-component ref="childComponent"></child-component>
  <button @click="click">Click</button>  
</div>

javascript:

var ChildComponent = {
  template: '<div>{{value}}</div>',
  data: function () {
    return {
      value: 0
    };
  },
  methods: {
    setValue: function(value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
  }
}

new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  components: {
    'child-component': ChildComponent
  },
  methods: {
    click: function() {
        this.$refs.childComponent.setValue(2.0);
    }
  }
})

For more info, see Vue documentation on refs.

| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    This way parent and child components become coupled. For real events, say when you can't just change a prop to trigger an action, I would go with the bus solution suggested by @Roy J – Jared Apr 19 '18 at 17:12
  • 4
    a ref to the docs would be a helpful aswell vuejs.org/v2/guide/… – ctf0 Aug 21 '18 at 1:22
  • In my child component, for special reasons, I had to use v-once to terminate the reactivity. Thus passing the prop down from parent to child wasn't an option, so this solution did the trick! – John Sep 15 '18 at 3:12
  • 1
    newbie question: Why use ref instead of creating a prop, that watches its value then emit it to another function in parent? I mean it does has a lot of things to do, but is using ref even safe? Thanks – Irfandy Jip Jan 21 '19 at 7:18
  • 5
    @IrfandyJip - yes, ref is safe. Generally, it's discouraged because the Vue community prefers to pass state to children, and events back to the parent. Generally speaking, this leads to more isolated, internally-consistent components (a good thing™). But, if the information you're passing to the child really is an event (or a command), modifying state isn't the right pattern. In that case, calling a method using a ref is totally fine, and it's not going to crash or anything. – joerick Feb 6 '19 at 9:58
78

What you are describing is a change of state in the parent. You pass that to the child via a prop. As you suggested, you would watch that prop. When the child takes action, it notifies the parent via an emit, and the parent might then change the state again.

var Child = {
  template: '<div>{{counter}}</div>',
  props: ['canI'],
  data: function () {
    return {
      counter: 0
    };
  },
  watch: {
    canI: function () {
      if (this.canI) {
        ++this.counter;
        this.$emit('increment');
      }
    }
  }
}
new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  components: {
    'my-component': Child
  },
  data: {
    childState: false
  },
  methods: {
    permitChild: function () {
      this.childState = true;
    },
    lockChild: function () {
      this.childState = false;
    }
  }
})
<script src="//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/vue/2.2.1/vue.js"></script>
<div id="app">
<my-component :can-I="childState" v-on:increment="lockChild"></my-component>
<button @click="permitChild">Go</button>
</div>

If you truly want to pass events to a child, you can do that by creating a bus (which is just a Vue instance) and passing it to the child as a prop.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I think this is the only answer in line with the official Vue.JS style guide and best practices. If you use the shorthand v-model on the component, you can also easily reset the value by emitting the corresponding event with less code. – Falco Oct 9 '17 at 15:16
  • For example, I want to give an alert when a user clicks a button. Do you propose for example: - watch a flag - set this flag from 0 to 1 when a click occurs, - do something - reset flag – Sinan Erdem Nov 23 '17 at 14:34
  • 9
    It is very uncomfortable, you have to create an extra prop in a child, an extra property in data, then add watch... It would be comfortable if there was built-in support to somehow transfer events from parent to child. This situation occurs quite often. – Илья Зеленько Oct 31 '18 at 16:02
  • 1
    As state by @ИльяЗеленько, it does happen quite often, it would be a godsend right about now. – Craig Jul 8 '19 at 20:28
  • 1
    Thanks @RoyJ, I guess that requires the bus prop to exist when the child subscribes to it though, I suppose the whole idea of sending events down to children is discouraged in Vue. – Ben Winding Jun 29 at 0:21
35

You can use $emit and $on. Using @RoyJ code:

html:

<div id="app">
  <my-component></my-component>
  <button @click="click">Click</button>  
</div>

javascript:

var Child = {
  template: '<div>{{value}}</div>',
  data: function () {
    return {
      value: 0
    };
  },
  methods: {
    setValue: function(value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
  },
  created: function() {
    this.$parent.$on('update', this.setValue);
  }
}

new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  components: {
    'my-component': Child
  },
  methods: {
    click: function() {
        this.$emit('update', 7);
    }
  }
})

Running example: https://jsfiddle.net/rjurado/m2spy60r/1/

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    I'm surprised it works. I thought emitting to a child was an anti-pattern, or that the intent was for emit to only be from child to parent. Are there any potential problems with going the other way? – jbodily Mar 6 '17 at 20:44
  • 2
    This may not be considered the best way, I don't know, but If you know what are you doing I thing threre is not a problem. The other way is use central bus: vuejs.org/v2/guide/… – drinor Mar 7 '17 at 7:24
  • 14
    This creates a coupling between the child and parent and is considered bad practice – morrislaptop Sep 12 '17 at 16:14
  • 5
    This only works because the parent is not a component but actually a vue app. In reality this is using the vue instance as a bus. – Julio Rodrigues Sep 14 '17 at 14:57
  • 2
    @Bsienn the call to this.$parent makes this component dependent on the parent. uses $emit to and props so the only dependencies are through Vue's communication system. This approach allows the same component to be used anywhere in the component hierarchy. – morrislaptop Jul 27 '19 at 2:59
7

A simple decoupled way to call methods on child components is by emitting a handler from the child and then invoking it from parent.

var Child = {
  template: '<div>{{value}}</div>',
  data: function () {
    return {
      value: 0
    };
  },
  methods: {
  	setValue(value) {
    	this.value = value;
    }
  },
  created() {
    this.$emit('handler', this.setValue);
  }
}

new Vue({
  el: '#app',
  components: {
    'my-component': Child
  },
  methods: {
  	setValueHandler(fn) {
    	this.setter = fn
    },
    click() {
    	this.setter(70)
    }
  }
})
<script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/vue@2.5.17/dist/vue.js"></script>

<div id="app">
  <my-component @handler="setValueHandler"></my-component>
  <button @click="click">Click</button>  
</div>

The parent keeps track of the child handler functions and calls whenever necessary.

| improve this answer | |
  • I like where this solution is going but what exactly is "this.setter" in the parent? – Craig Jul 5 '19 at 15:16
  • It’s the setValue function reference emitted by the child component as an argument to handler event. – nilobarp Jul 7 '19 at 16:16
6

If you have time, use Vuex store for watching variables (aka state) or trigger (aka dispatch) an action directly.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    due to reactivity of vuejs/vuex that is the best aproach, in parent make a action/mutation that change a vuex property value and in child have a computed value that get this same vuex $store.state.property.value or a "watch" method that do something when vuex "$store.state.property.value" changes – FabianSilva Dec 7 '17 at 15:21
6

Did not like the event-bus approach using $on bindings in the child during create. Why? Subsequent create calls (I'm using vue-router) bind the message handler more than once--leading to multiple responses per message.

The orthodox solution of passing props down from parent to child and putting a property watcher in the child worked a little better. Only problem being that the child can only act on a value transition. Passing the same message multiple times needs some kind of bookkeeping to force a transition so the child can pick up the change.

I've found that if I wrap the message in an array, it will always trigger the child watcher--even if the value remains the same.

Parent:

{
   data: function() {
      msgChild: null,
   },
   methods: {
      mMessageDoIt: function() {
         this.msgChild = ['doIt'];
      }
   }   
   ...
}

Child:

{
   props: ['msgChild'],
   watch: {
      'msgChild': function(arMsg) {
         console.log(arMsg[0]);
      }
   }
}

HTML:

<parent>
   <child v-bind="{ 'msgChild': msgChild }"></child>
</parent>
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I think this won't work if msgChild has always the same status on the parent. For example: I want a component that opens a modal. The parent doesn't care if the current status is open or close, it just wants to open the modal at any moment. So, if the parent does this.msgChild = true; the modal is closed, and then the parent does this.msgChild = true, the child won't receive the event – Jorge Sainz Nov 19 '18 at 10:34
  • 1
    @JorgeSainz: That is why I'm wrapping the value in an array prior to assigning it to the data item. Without wrapping the value in an array, it behaves just as you specify. So, msgChild = true, msgChild = true -- no event. msgChild = [true], msgChild = [true] -- event! – Jason Stewart Nov 20 '18 at 11:20
  • 1
    I didn't see it. Thanks for the clarification – Jorge Sainz Nov 20 '18 at 14:01
  • This is cool, but feels a little hackish. I'm going to use it since it's the cleaner than using the component ref hack and less complicated that the event bus solution. I know that vue wants decoupling and only allow state changes to effect the component but there should be some builtin way to call a child's methods if needed. Perhaps a modifier on a prop that once it changes state you could automatically reset it to a default value so that the watcher is ready for the next state change. Anyway thanks for posting your find. – Craig Jul 5 '19 at 15:51
3

The below example is self explainatory. where refs and events can be used to call function from and to parent and child.

// PARENT
<template>
  <parent>
    <child
      @onChange="childCallBack"
      ref="childRef"
      :data="moduleData"
    />
    <button @click="callChild">Call Method in child</button>
  </parent>
</template>

<script>
export default {
  methods: {
    callChild() {
      this.$refs.childRef.childMethod('Hi from parent');
    },
    childCallBack(message) {
      console.log('message from child', message);
    }
  }
};
</script>

// CHILD
<template>
  <child>
    <button @click="callParent">Call Parent</button>
  </child>
</template>

<script>
export default {
  methods: {
    callParent() {
      this.$emit('onChange', 'hi from child');
    },
    childMethod(message) {
      console.log('message from parent', message);
    }
  }
}
</script>
| improve this answer | |
1

I think we should to have a consideration about the necessity of parent to use the child’s methods.In fact,parents needn’t to concern the method of child,but can treat the child component as a FSA(finite state machine).Parents component to control the state of child component.So the solution to watch the status change or just use the compute function is enough

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    If you're saying "parents should never concern themselves with controlling the children", there are cases where this is necessary. Consider a countdown timer component. The parent may wish to reset the timer to start over. Simply using props isn't enough because going from time=60 to time=60 will not modify the prop. The timer should expose a 'reset' function that the parent can call as appropriate. – tbm Apr 15 at 16:53
0

you can use key to reload child component using key

<component :is="child1" :filter="filter" :key="componentKey"></component>

If you want to reload component with new filter, if button click filter the child component

reloadData() {            
   this.filter = ['filter1','filter2']
   this.componentKey += 1;  
},

and use the filter to trigger the function

| improve this answer | |

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