27

I currently have an existing Pandas DataFrame with a date index, and columns each with a specific name.

As for the data cells, they are filled with various float values.

I would like to copy my DataFrame, but replace all these values with zero.

The objective is to reuse the structure of the DataFrame (dimensions, index, column names), but clear all the current values by replacing them with zeroes.

The way I'm currently achieving this is as follow:

df[df > 0] = 0

However, this would not replace any negative value in the DataFrame.

Isn't there a more general approach to filling an entire existing DataFrame with a single common value?

Thank you in advance for your help.

  • 3
    df.loc[:,:] = 0 ? – MaxU Mar 6 '17 at 22:29
42

The absolute fastest way, which also preserves dtypes, is the following:

for col in df.columns:
    df[col].values[:] = 0

This directly writes to the underlying numpy array of each column. I doubt any other method will be faster than this, as this allocates no additional storage and doesn't pass through pandas's dtype handling. You can also use np.issubdtype to only zero out numeric columns. This is probably what you want if you have a mixed dtype DataFrame, but of course it's not necessary if your DataFrame is already entirely numeric.

for col in df.columns:
    if np.issubdtype(df[col].dtype, np.number):
        df[col].values[:] = 0

For small DataFrames, the subtype check is somewhat costly. However, the cost of zeroing a non-numeric column is substantial, so if you're not sure whether your DataFrame is entirely numeric, you should probably include the issubdtype check.


Timing comparisons

Setup

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

def make_df(n, only_numeric):
    series = [
        pd.Series(range(n), name="int", dtype=int),
        pd.Series(range(n), name="float", dtype=float),
    ]
    if only_numeric:
        series.extend(
            [
                pd.Series(range(n, 2 * n), name="int2", dtype=int),
                pd.Series(range(n, 2 * n), name="float2", dtype=float),
            ]
        )
    else:
        series.extend(
            [
                pd.date_range(start="1970-1-1", freq="T", periods=n, name="dt")
                .to_series()
                .reset_index(drop=True),
                pd.Series(
                    [chr((i % 26) + 65) for i in range(n)],
                    name="string",
                    dtype="object",
                ),
            ]
        )

    return pd.concat(series, axis=1)

>>> make_df(5, True)
   int  float  int2  float2
0    0    0.0     5     5.0
1    1    1.0     6     6.0
2    2    2.0     7     7.0
3    3    3.0     8     8.0
4    4    4.0     9     9.0

>>> make_df(5, False)
   int  float                  dt string
0    0    0.0 1970-01-01 00:00:00      A
1    1    1.0 1970-01-01 00:01:00      B
2    2    2.0 1970-01-01 00:02:00      C
3    3    3.0 1970-01-01 00:03:00      D
4    4    4.0 1970-01-01 00:04:00      E

Small DataFrame

n = 10_000                                                                                  

# Numeric df, no issubdtype check
%%timeit df = make_df(n, True)
for col in df.columns:
    df[col].values[:] = 0
36.1 µs ± 510 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

# Numeric df, yes issubdtype check
%%timeit df = make_df(n, True)
for col in df.columns:
    if np.issubdtype(df[col].dtype, np.number):
        df[col].values[:] = 0
53 µs ± 645 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

# Non-numeric df, no issubdtype check
%%timeit df = make_df(n, False)
for col in df.columns:
    df[col].values[:] = 0
113 µs ± 391 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

# Non-numeric df, yes issubdtype check
%%timeit df = make_df(n, False)
for col in df.columns:
    if np.issubdtype(df[col].dtype, np.number):
        df[col].values[:] = 0
39.4 µs ± 1.91 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

Large DataFrame

n = 10_000_000                                                                             

# Numeric df, no issubdtype check
%%timeit df = make_df(n, True)
for col in df.columns:
    df[col].values[:] = 0
38.7 ms ± 151 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

# Numeric df, yes issubdtype check
%%timeit df = make_df(n, True)
for col in df.columns:
    if np.issubdtype(df[col].dtype, np.number):
        df[col].values[:] = 0
39.1 ms ± 556 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

# Non-numeric df, no issubdtype check
%%timeit df = make_df(n, False)
for col in df.columns:
    df[col].values[:] = 0
99.5 ms ± 748 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

# Non-numeric df, yes issubdtype check
%%timeit df = make_df(n, False)
for col in df.columns:
    if np.issubdtype(df[col].dtype, np.number):
        df[col].values[:] = 0
17.8 ms ± 228 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

I’d previously suggested the answer below, but I now consider it harmful — it’s significantly slower than the above answers and is harder to reason about. Its only advantage is being nicer to write.

The cleanest way is to use a bare colon to reference the entire dataframe.

df[:] = 0

Unfortunately the dtype situation is a bit fuzzy because every column in the resulting dataframe will have the same dtype. If every column of df was originally float, the new dtypes will still be float. But if a single column was int or object, it seems that the new dtypes will all be int.

| improve this answer | |
14

You can use the replace function:

df2 = df.replace(df, 0)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is the preferred method in the event you need to perform manipulations requiring both the original and the copy. – NickBraunagel Mar 8 '18 at 20:01
  • No need to copy first. Just df2 = df.replace(df, 0) is sufficient. The original is not affected by this! – kadee Apr 26 '18 at 8:34
  • 1
    Be careful about value coercion. – Yatharth Agarwal Aug 29 '18 at 16:08
8

Since you are trying to make a copy, it might be better to simply create a new data frame with values as 0, and columns and index from the original data frame:

pd.DataFrame(0, columns=df.columns, index=df.index)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    FYI: Using 0 as initial value will set the datatype to integer. Assigning floats to the dataframe will cause them to be converted to integers. If you want to use floats, set the datatype to 0.0. – joost Aug 31 '17 at 17:56
0

FYI the accepted answer from BallpointBen was almost 2 orders of magnitude faster for me than the .replace() operation offered by Joe T Boka. Both are helpful. Thanks!

To be clear, the fast way described by BallpointBen is:

for col in df.columns: df[col].values[:] = 0

*I would have commented this but I don't have enough street cred/reputation yet since I have been lurking for years. I used timeit.timeit() for the comparison.

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