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I have a problem concerning a moving point light in my GLES 2.0 Android app:

I have an instance of Person walking around on a large surface. This Person needs to have a light above his head in order to get a small area around him illuminated properly. Since the light instance has the person instance as its parent, its position in world space moves exactly the way the person moves (y-Offset +4). But every time I start the app, the light is not positioned on top and it does not move exactly the way the person moves (or at least it looks like it is not). It seems like it's left and in front of the person even though light and person share the same x- and z-values. The Person is a cube (no complex model yet).

Here is my code of the cube's draw method:

public void draw(float[] pPMatrix, float[] pVMatrix)
{
    float[] MVPMatrix = new float[16];
    Matrix.setIdentityM(getParent().getModelMatrix(),0);
    Matrix.translateM(getParent().getModelMatrix(),0,mXLL, mYLL, mZLL);


    Matrix.multiplyMM(MVPMatrix, 0, pVMatrix, 0, getParent().getModelMatrix(), 0);
    Matrix.multiplyMM(MVPMatrix, 0, pPMatrix, 0, MVPMatrix, 0);

    // Add program to OpenGL ES environment
    GLES20.glUseProgram(mProgram);

    // ..... 

    GLES20.glUniformMatrix4fv(LightingProgram.getMVPMatrixHandle(), 1, false, MVPMatrix, 0);
    GLES20.glUniformMatrix4fv(LightingProgram.getMVMatrixHandle(), 1, false, pVMatrix, 0);

    LightObject lo = mParent.getWorld().getLightObjects().get(0);
    Matrix.multiplyMV(lo.getLightPosInEyeSpace(), 0, pVMatrix, 0, lo.getLightPosInWorldSpace(), 0 );
    GLES20.glUniform3f(LightingProgram.getLightPosHandle(), lo.getLightPosInEyeSpace()[0], lo.getLightPosInEyeSpace()[1], lo.getLightPosInEyeSpace()[2]);

    // Draw the triangle
    GLES20.glDrawArrays(GLES20.GL_TRIANGLES, 0, mVertexCount);

}

Vertex Shader code is:

uniform mat4 u_MVPMatrix;
uniform mat4 u_MVMatrix;        

attribute vec4 a_Position;  
attribute vec4 a_Color;         
attribute vec3 a_Normal;
attribute vec2 a_TexCoordinate;

varying vec3 v_Position;
varying vec4 v_Color;   
varying vec3 v_Normal;      
varying vec2 v_TexCoordinate;


void main()
{
    // Transform the vertex into eye space.
    v_Position = vec3(u_MVMatrix * a_Position);

    // Pass through the color.
    v_Color = a_Color;

    // Pass through the texture coordinate.
    v_TexCoordinate = a_TexCoordinate;

    // Transform the normal's orientation into eye space.
    v_Normal = vec3(u_MVMatrix * vec4(a_Normal, 0.0));

    // gl_Position is a special variable used to store the final position.
    // Multiply the vertex by the matrix to get the final point in normalized screen coordinates.
    gl_Position = u_MVPMatrix * a_Position;
}

Fragment Shader code is:

precision mediump float;
uniform vec3 u_LightPos;   
uniform sampler2D u_Texture; 

varying vec3 v_Position;
varying vec4 v_Color;
varying vec3 v_Normal
varying vec2 v_TexCoordinate;

void main()
{

    float distance = length(u_LightPos - v_Position);

    // Get a lighting direction vector from the light to the vertex.
    vec3 lightVector = normalize(u_LightPos - v_Position);

    float diffuse = max(dot(v_Normal, lightVector), 0.0);
    diffuse = diffuse * (1.0 / (1.0 + (0.25 * distance)));

    // Add ambient lighting
    diffuse = diffuse + 0.25;

    gl_FragColor = (diffuse * v_Color * texture2D(u_Texture, v_TexCoordinate));
}

I think it has something to do with the way I pass in the light object's position... but I cannot figure out what's the correct way.

Thanks in advance... :-)

==========================================

!!EDIT!! I uploaded a video of the problem: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/17038392/opengl_lighting_test.mp4 (2MB)

Every shape in this scene is a cube. When the person stands in the middle of the room, the light has no effect on the floor. If the person moves to the upper corner, the light moves to the middle of the room. Now here is the very strange thing: since the light is positioned above the person it illuminates the yellow crates just fine when the person is in the middle of the room. HOW ON EARTH CAN THIS HAPPEN? ;-)

==========================================

EDIT 2: Ok, so I tried to do what you said. But, being a rookie, I am having trouble doing it correctly:

My draw-Method for any cube instance:

public void draw(float[] pPMatrix, float[] pVMatrix)
{
    float[] MVPMatrix = new float[16];
    float[] normalVMatrix = new float[16];
    float[] normalTransposed = new float[16];

    // Move object
    Matrix.setIdentityM(getParent().getModelMatrix(),0);
    Matrix.translateM(getParent().getModelMatrix(),0,mXLL, mYLL, mZLL);
    Matrix.multiplyMM(MVPMatrix, 0, pVMatrix, 0, getParent().getModelMatrix(), 0);
    Matrix.multiplyMM(MVPMatrix, 0, pPMatrix, 0, MVPMatrix, 0);

    // create normal matrix by inverting and transposing the modelmatrix
    Matrix.invertM(normalVMatrix, 0, getParent().getModelMatrix(), 0);
    Matrix.transposeM(normalTransposed, 0, normalVMatrix, 0);

    // Add program to OpenGL ES environment
    GLES20.glUseProgram(mProgram);

    // ============================
    // POSITION
    // ============================
    getVertexBuffer().position(0);
    GLES20.glVertexAttribPointer(LightingProgram.getPositionHandle(), COORDS_PER_VERTEX, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false, vertexStride, getVertexBuffer());
    GLES20.glEnableVertexAttribArray(LightingProgram.getPositionHandle());

    // ============================
    // COLOR
    // ============================
    getColorBuffer().position(0);
    GLES20.glVertexAttribPointer(LightingProgram.getColorHandle(), COLOR_DATA_SIZE, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false, 0, getColorBuffer());
    GLES20.glEnableVertexAttribArray(LightingProgram.getColorHandle());

    // ============================
    // NORMALS
    // ============================
    // Pass in the normal information
    if(LightingProgram.getNormalHandle() != -1)
    {
        getNormalBuffer().position(0);
        GLES20.glVertexAttribPointer(LightingProgram.getNormalHandle(), NORMAL_DATA_SIZE, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false, 0, getNormalBuffer());
        GLES20.glEnableVertexAttribArray(LightingProgram.getNormalHandle());
        checkGLError("normals");
    }

    // ============================
    // TEXTURE
    // ============================
    // Set the active texture unit to texture unit 0.
    GLES20.glActiveTexture(GLES20.GL_TEXTURE0);

    // Bind the texture to this unit.
    GLES20.glBindTexture(GLES20.GL_TEXTURE_2D, getTextureHandle());

    // Tell the texture uniform sampler to use this texture in the shader by binding to texture unit 0.
    //GLES20.glUniform1i(mTextureUniformHandle, 0);
    GLES20.glUniform1i(LightingProgram.getTextureUniformHandle(), 0);


    getTextureBuffer().position(0);
    GLES20.glVertexAttribPointer(LightingProgram.getTextureCoordinateHandle(), TEXTURE_DATA_SIZE, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false, 0, getTextureBuffer());
    GLES20.glEnableVertexAttribArray(LightingProgram.getTextureCoordinateHandle());

    // Pass the projection and view transformation to the shader
    GLES20.glUniformMatrix4fv(LightingProgram.getMVPMatrixHandle(), 1, false, MVPMatrix, 0);
    GLES20.glUniformMatrix4fv(LightingProgram.getMVMatrixHandle(), 1, false, pVMatrix, 0);
    GLES20.glUniformMatrix4fv(LightingProgram.getNormalHandle(), 1, false, normalTransposed, 0);

    LightObject lo = mParent.getWorld().getLightObjects().get(0);
    Matrix.multiplyMV(lo.getLightPosInEyeSpace(), 0, pVMatrix, 0, lo.getLightPosInWorldSpace(), 0 );
    GLES20.glUniform3f(LightingProgram.getLightPosHandle(), lo.getLightPosInEyeSpace()[0], lo.getLightPosInEyeSpace()[1], lo.getLightPosInEyeSpace()[2]);

    // Draw the triangle
    GLES20.glDrawArrays(GLES20.GL_TRIANGLES, 0, mVertexCount);

    // Disable vertex array
  GLES20.glDisableVertexAttribArray(LightingProgram.getPositionHandle());
    GLES20.glDisableVertexAttribArray(LightingProgram.getTextureCoordinateHandle());
    if(LightingProgram.getNormalHandle() != -1)
        GLES20.glDisableVertexAttribArray(LightingProgram.getNormalHandle());
    GLES20.glDisableVertexAttribArray(LightingProgram.getColorHandle());
    checkGLError("end");
}

So, my updated vertex shader code now is:

uniform mat4 u_MVPMatrix;       // A constant representing the combined model/view/projection matrix.
uniform mat4 u_MVMatrix;        // A constant representing the combined model/view matrix.
uniform mat4 u_NMatrix;         // combined normal/view matrix ???

attribute vec4 a_Position;      // Per-vertex position information we will pass in.
attribute vec4 a_Color;         // Per-vertex color information we will pass in.
attribute vec3 a_Normal;        // Per-vertex normal information we will pass in.
attribute vec2 a_TexCoordinate; // Per-vertex texture coordinate information we will pass in.

varying vec3 v_Position;        // This will be passed into the fragment shader.
varying vec4 v_Color;           // This will be passed into the fragment shader.
varying vec3 v_Normal;          // This will be passed into the fragment shader.
varying vec2 v_TexCoordinate;   // This will be passed into the fragment shader.

// The entry point for our vertex shader.
void main()
{
    // Transform the vertex into eye space.
    v_Position = vec3(u_MVMatrix * a_Position);

    // Pass through the color.
    v_Color = a_Color;

    // Pass through the texture coordinate.
    v_TexCoordinate = a_TexCoordinate;

    // Transform the normal's orientation into eye space.
    v_Normal = vec3(u_NMatrix * vec4(a_Normal, 0.0)); // THIS does not look right...
    //v_Normal = vec3(u_MVMatrix * vec4(a_Normal, 0.0));

    // gl_Position is a special variable used to store the final position.
    // Multiply the vertex by the matrix to get the final point in normalized screen coordinates.
    gl_Position = u_MVPMatrix * a_Position;
}

I thought that maybe if I inverted and transposed the model matrix and save this to a normal matrix, it might already fix the issue. But I think I got it completely wrong..

1

It looks a bit messy. Some code is missing and you need to start commenting your code more often. Even if only for the SO question.

I am not sure what the draw input parameters are but I can assume that pPMatrix is a projection matrix and pVMatrix is a view matrix.

Then in the code there is this strange line: Matrix.translateM(getParent().getModelMatrix(),0,mXLL, mYLL, mZLL); which I assume moves the person to its current position. I would then expect that this is actually part of a view matrix if you are looking form the persons perspective. In any case this value is not included into the component you use for the light. Then again what does getLightPosInWorldSpace return?

If we try to break it down a bit you have a character whose position is defined by his model matrix. This describes its location and orientation in your scene. The projection matrix is defined by your view size and field of view. Then the view matrix is computed from the persons orientation or from wherever you are looking at the scene (lookAt procedure is most common).

No matter how you define all these then the light position depends only on the person model matrix. So you need to multiply the light position (0, 4, 0) by the model matrix of the character. So it might be that this is what you wanted to do in Matrix.multiplyMV(lo.getLightPosInEyeSpace(), 0, pVMatrix, 0, lo.getLightPosInWorldSpace(), 0 );.

By doing this you can actually test on the CPU that the result of the light position is correct depending on where the character position is.

Now what you need to pass in your shader (seeing what you use) are actually the MVP matrix and the model matrix next to the computed light source. The MV matrix should not be used here as the eye position does not effect the lighting effect in your case.

Now the v_Position must be a fragment computed in the scene coordinates so it must be multiplied by the model matrix only. This will basically give you the coordinate of the fragment(pixel) in the scene, not on the view. Now use this position to get the distance from the light and continue the computation as you already did.

Then there seems to be an issue with your normals. Computing the normals is not done by multiplying them with a model matrix nor model-view matrix. Imagine a scenario where you have a normal (0,1,0) and you multiply it with a matrix which has a translation (10, 0, 0); the resulting normal is then (10, 1, 0) which even when normalized has no sense, the result must still be (0,1,0) since no rotations were applied. Please look into how you generate the matrix to transform your normals which includes all possible edge cases. But note you can use the top left 3x3 part of the (model) matrix to transform them including the normalization for most situation (this fails for cases where the normalization should not be done and for the cases where the model matrix is not scaled equally for each of the axises).

EDIT:

To look into it more theoretically what you are dealing with is we are usually using 3 matrices, model, view and projection.

The projection matrix defines the projection of shapes on your screen. In your case it should depend on your view ratio and on the field of view you want to show. It should never effect the lighting, where shapes are positioned or anything beyond how all of these are mapped onto your screen.

The view matrix is usually used to define how you are looking into the scene. In your case where are you looking at your scene from and toward which direction. You should probably use a look-at procedure for that one. This matrix does not effect the lighting or any of the positions of the object, just how you look on the objects.

Then the model matrix is the one that is used only to position a specific object in the scene. The reason why we use this is so you may have only 1 vertex buffer for all instances of your object drawn. So in your case you have 3 cubes which should all share the same vertex buffer but are drawn in 3 different places because their model matrix is different.

Now your character is no different from any other object in your scene. It has a vertex buffer and it has a model matrix. If you wanted to swap to a first person view from what you have you only needed to multiply natural base vectors with the character model matrix and then use those vectors in a look-at method to construct a new view matrix. The base vectors probably being location(0,0,0), forward(0,0,1), up(0,1,0). Once transforming these you can then construct the "center" as location+forward. And by doing so you still have no difference in how the lighting works or how the objects are illuminated, your view on the scene should have no effect on that.

So your light is attached to the character offset by some vector offset(0,4,0). This means that the light position in the scene is this same vector multiplied with your character model matrix since that matrix is the one that defines the position of the character in your scene. It could even be interpreted that the light position is at (0,0,0) and moved to a character location which is multiplying it with model matrix and then translated by offset so again multiplied with the translation matrix created with this vector. This is important as you could for instance construct this translation matrix T and a rotation matrix R which rotates around X axis (for instance) and then by multiplying them as modelMatrix*T*R would make the light rotate around your character.

So assuming you have all these matrices for all objects and you have a light position you can then start looking into shaders. You need to construct the whole MVP matrix as that is the one that will map the objects onto your screen. So this matrix is used only for the gl_Position. As for the actual pixel in the scene you need to multiply it with a model matrix only.

Then the first issue is you need to also transform the normals. You need to construct the matrix for them by inverting and then transposing the model matrix. The source. So multiply your normal with this matrix instead of the model matrix.

So now things become pretty simply. You have computed the light position on the CPU and sent it as an uniform. You have the fragment on-scene position and you have its normal. So with these you can compute the lighting you already have in your fragment shader.

Now I did lie a bit about the view matrix having no effect on the lighting. It does effect it but not in your case. You have not implemented any shine so this lighting component is not added. But when(if) you will add it then it is easier to simply pass your position as another uniform then to use a view matrix to get the same result.

It is hard to tell from the code you posted what all is in conflict but at least it seems that the light position is transformed incorrectly and that the normals are transformed incorrectly.

EDIT: about debugging

When working with openGL you need to be inventive when it comes to debugging. Seeing your results there are still many things that may be wrong. It is pretty hard to check them on the CPU or by having some logs and the best way is usually to modify the shaders the way that you will get the results giving you additional info.

To debug the fragment position in the scene:

As previously mentioned the fragment in scene position is not effected by the perspective you are looking from. So it should not depend from the view or projection matrix. In your fragment shader this is the value stored in v_Position.

You need to set the boundaries in which you are going to test and these depend on your scene size (where you are putting your walls and cubes...).

You said that your walls are offset by 25 so it is safe to assume that your scene will be in range [-30, 30]. you will want to debug each axis separately so for instance lets take a red value at -25 and green value at 25. To test the Y coordinate (usually height) you simply use gl_FragColor = vec4(1.0-(v_Position.y+30)/60, (v_Position.y+30)/60), 0.0, 1.0). This should show a nice gradient on all objects where the lower their Y value more red should the color be. Then you do the same for the 2 other components and for each of them you should get these nice gradients all in each own direction. The gradient should be visible throughout the whole scene equally, not just for each of the objects.

To debug the normals in the scene:

The normals must be consistent between objects depending on which way they are facing. Since all the objects in your case are parallel to the axises and normalized this should be pretty easy. You are expecting only 6 possible values so 2 passes should do the job (positive and negative).

Use gl_FragColor = vec4(max(v_Normal.x, 0.0), max(v_Normal.y, 0.0), max(v_Normal.z, 0.0), 1.0) for positive normals. This will show all the faces that facing positive X as red, all that are facing positive Y green and all facing positive Z blue.

The second test is then gl_FragColor = vec4(max(-v_Normal.x, 0.0), max(-v_Normal.y, 0.0), max(-v_Normal.z, 0.0), 1.0) which does exactly the same for those facing negative coordinates.

To debug light position:

When the first test passes the light position can be tested by only illuminating the near by objects. So the length(u_LightPos - v_Position.xyz) shows you the light distance. You must normalize it so in your scene use highp float scale = 1.0 - length(u_LightPos - v_Position.xyz)/50.0 and then use this in the color as gl_FragColor = vec4(scale, scale, scale, 1.0). This will make all the objects near the light white while those very far away black. A nice gradient should be shown.

The point of these tests:

You do this because your current result depends on multiple values where all of them can be bugged. By isolating the issues you will easily find where the problem is.

The first test discards the normals and the light position so if it is incorrect it only means that you are multiplying your position with a wrong matrix. You need to ensure that the model matrix is used to multiply the position when computing v_Position.

The second test discards both the position in scene and the light position. You will still be able to see your scene but the colors will be defined by your normals only. If the result is incorrect you either have wrong normals to begin with or they are transformed incorrectly when using a normal matrix. You may even disable the normal matrix multiplication just to see which of the two is incorrect. If disabling does not fix the issue then the normals are incorrect in your vertex buffer.

The third test discards your normals and your logic to compute the lighting effect. The first test must pass because we still need the position of your models. So if this test fails you are most likely not positioning the light correctly. Other possibilities are that the normals are incorrect (for which you have the test) and the third is that you compute the light effect incorrectly.

  • Hi Matic, thank you so much for looking at my code. Sorry for not providing enough information. I have not thought this through... I wil respond to your questions / assumptions later. Have been busy today. – AudioGuy Mar 7 '17 at 16:38
  • The game is not 1st-person. It's rather like Diablo, so the camera is above the character. Every cube has it's model space where its lower left is at (0,0,0). Then, the cube gets translated to its final position in the world with translateM(); The scene renders alright. Now, if the cube is at (4,1,3) in the world (because its model got translated to (4,1,3)), I want to move a light to say 4,4,3 (because it always needs to hover over the translated cube. So, if the cube is at (4,1,3), I manually update the lights position to (4,4,3). This is what getLightPosInWorldSpace() returns on call. – AudioGuy Mar 7 '17 at 16:52
  • I see. But before you use it I see you are multiplying the position by the pVMatrix. Why? And then what is getLightPosInWorldSpace? – Matic Oblak Mar 8 '17 at 7:46
  • 'pVMatrix' is the view matrix as method parameter (thus the 'p'). I thought that I need to multiply the light with the view matrix because all light rendering is calculcated in eye/camera space instead of world space. getLightPosInWorldSpace() returns a 4-cell-float-array containing: x, y, z position of the light in my game world (absolute coordinates). The fourth parameter is always 1. Honestly, I do not know why it has to be 1, but I read it in a tutorial some time ago. You see, I do not understand the whole concept of lighting a scene... ;-) – AudioGuy Mar 8 '17 at 15:45
  • Edited my post and added a video of the problem. Thanks for your patience! – AudioGuy Mar 8 '17 at 17:47

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