66

In a container inside a pod, how can I run a command using kubectl? For example, if i need to do something like this inside a container:

kubectl get pods

I have tried this : In my dockerfile, I have these commands :

RUN curl -LO https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/$(curl -s https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/stable.txt)/bin/linux/amd64/kubectl
RUN chmod +x ./kubectl
RUN sudo mv ./kubectl /usr/local/bin/kubectl

EDIT : I was trying the OSX file, I have corrected it to the linux binary file. (corrected by @svenwltr

While creating the docker file, this is successful, but when I run the kubectl get pods inside a container,

kubectl get pods

I get this error :

The connection to the server : was refused - did you specify the right host or port?

When I was deploying locally, I was encountering this error if my docker-machine was not running, but inside a container how can a docker-machine be running?

Locally, I get around this error by running the following commands: (dev is the name of the docker-machine)

docker-machine env dev
eval $(docker-machine env dev)

Can someone please tell me what is it that I need to do?

2
  • I am confused. Do you run that container in Kubernetes or in Docker machine?
    – svenwltr
    Mar 8, 2017 at 7:40
  • @svenwltr - I am running kubernetes locally on minikube, and it suggests to use a docker deamon in the kubernetes VM.
    – Dreams
    Mar 9, 2017 at 4:53

7 Answers 7

42

I would use kubernetes api, you just need to install curl, instead of kubectl and the rest is restful.

curl http://localhost:8080/api/v1/namespaces/default/pods

Im running above command on one of my apiservers. Change the localhost to apiserver ip address/dns name.

Depending on your configuration you may need to use ssl or provide client certificate.

In order to find api endpoints, you can use --v=8 with kubectl.

example:

kubectl get pods --v=8

Resources:

Kubernetes API documentation

Update for RBAC:

I assume you already configured rbac, created a service account for your pod and run using it. This service account should have list permissions on pods in required namespace. In order to do that, you need to create a role and role binding for that service account.

Every container in a cluster is populated with a token that can be used for authenticating to the API server. To verify, Inside the container run:

cat /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount/token

To make request to apiserver, inside the container run:

curl -ik \
     -H "Authorization: Bearer $(cat /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount/token)" \
     https://kubernetes.default.svc.cluster.local/api/v1/namespaces/default/pods
6
  • I tried your suggested answer, but it gives me another error - curl: (7) Failed to connect to 192.168.99.100 port 8080: Connection refused. Although am able to do a kubectl get pods. Also, when I run the command netstat -atn to check the open ports, there are no ports shown open on the particular ip.
    – Dreams
    Mar 8, 2017 at 5:39
  • @Tarun 192.168.99.100 is the api server ip address right? btw I just tested it on my setup, its working fine. Mar 8, 2017 at 6:29
  • Yes, I am running kubernetes on minikube. Its the minikube ip. I had made a mistake, I was trying port 8080. But, then when I tried a kubectl config view, it shows port 8443. Also, when I checked the api endpoints, it shows "https" for mine. Is that the same for you? When I try with https, I get a ssl error(curl: (60) SSL certificate problem: Invalid certificate chain). I am trying to resolve it, will update as soon as i resolve the error.
    – Dreams
    Mar 8, 2017 at 6:48
  • @Tarun Im on production environment, try --insecure with your curl, Do you have your ca.pem and client.pem and client-key.pem? if so you can try : curl https://ip:8443/api/v1/namespaces/default/pods --cacert ca.pem --insecure --key client-key.pem --cert client.pem Mar 8, 2017 at 7:30
  • I tried --insecure but it does not resolve the problem, Ya, I did not have .pem files, will try adding them and update asap. Again, thanks a lot :)
    – Dreams
    Mar 9, 2017 at 4:55
34

Bit late to the party here, but this is my two cents:

I've found using kubectl within a container much easier than calling the cluster's api

(Why? Auto authentication!)

Say you're deploying a Node.js project that needs kubectl usage.

  1. Download & Build kubectl inside the container
  2. Build your application, copying kubectl to your container
  3. Voila! kubectl provides a rich cli for managing your kubernetes cluster

Helpful documentation

--- EDITS ---

After working with kubectl in my cluster pods, I found a more effective way to authenticate pods to be able to make k8s API calls. This method provides stricter authentication.

  1. Create a ServiceAccount for your pod, and configure your pod to use said account. k8s Service Account docs
  2. Configure a RoleBinding or ClusterRoleBinding to allow services to have the authorization to communicate with the k8s API. k8s Role Binding docs
  3. Call the API directly, or use a the k8s-client to manage API calls for you. I HIGHLY recommend using the client, it has automatic configuration for pods which removes the authentication token step required with normal requests.

When you're done, you will have the following: ServiceAccount, ClusterRoleBinding, Deployment (your pods)

Feel free to comment if you need some clearer direction, I'll try to help out as much as I can :)

All-in-on example

apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
  name: k8s-101
spec:
  replicas: 3
  template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        app: k8s-101
    spec:
      serviceAccountName: k8s-101-role
      containers:
      - name: k8s-101
        imagePullPolicy: Always
        image: salathielgenese/k8s-101
        ports:
        - name: app
          containerPort: 3000
---
kind: ClusterRoleBinding
apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
metadata:
  name: k8s-101-role
subjects:
- kind: ServiceAccount
  name: k8s-101-role
  namespace: default
roleRef:
  kind: ClusterRole
  name: cluster-admin
  apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
---
apiVersion: v1
kind: ServiceAccount
metadata:
  name: k8s-101-role

The salathielgenese/k8s-101 image contains kubectl. So one can just log into a pod container & execute kubectl as if he was running it on k8s host: kubectl exec -it pod-container-id -- kubectl get pods

5
  • Can you descripte the part on how to connect the api a bit more in detail?
    – Berndinox
    Sep 4, 2018 at 19:47
  • @Berndinox sure! All of the kubectl commands can be input over command line. Using Node's fork child process, you can execute these commands. Make sure to initialize the kubectl proxy before executing other commands. To build the docker image with kubectl: pastebin.com/6a8kp6aR
    – mster
    Sep 7, 2018 at 18:54
  • 1
    As a k8s beginner, those directives above sounds magic but I found some help to translate it into some configuration - kubernetes.slack.com/archives/C09NXKJKA/…. So I'll edit to provide an example. Apr 12, 2019 at 9:25
  • @mster Could you help me with the Dockerfile? I want to install kubectl in the container I'm getting the error: failed to solve with frontend dockerfile.v0: failed to create LLB definition: circular dependency detected on stage: kubectl. This is my Dockerfile: pastebin.com/Lqb1py64 Nov 15, 2021 at 18:22
  • Never ever give Cluster-Admin if it's not needed. Apart from that, the solution seems viable. Nov 23, 2021 at 14:54
19

First Question

/usr/local/bin/kubectl: cannot execute binary file

It looks like you downloaded the OSX binary for kubectl. When running in Docker you probably need the Linux one:

https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/$(curl -s https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-release/release/stable.txt)/bin/linux/amd64/kubectl

Second Question

If you run kubectl in a proper configured Kubernetes cluster, it should be able to connect to the apiserver.

kubectl basically uses this code to find the apiserver and authenticate: github.com/kubernetes/client-go/rest.InClusterConfig

This means:

  • The host and port of the apiserver are stored in the environment variables KUBERNETES_SERVICE_HOST and KUBERNETES_SERVICE_PORT.
  • The access token is mounted to var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount/token.
  • The server certificate is mounted to /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount/ca.crt.

This is all data kubectl needs to know to connect to the apiserver.

Some thoughts why this might won't work:

  • The container doesn't run in Kubernetes.
    • It's not enough to use the same Docker host; the container needs to run as part of a pod definition.
  • The access is restricted by using an authorization plugin (which is not the default).
  • The service account credentials are overwritten by the pod definition (spec.serviceAccountName).
4
  • Yes, thank you for pointing it out. I made the necessary changes for linux. But, I still get another error, will update the question. :)
    – Dreams
    Mar 8, 2017 at 6:50
  • I updated the answer. Not sure if I understood the question correctly.
    – svenwltr
    Mar 8, 2017 at 8:04
  • 1
    Haven't been able to try this, will update asap. But, thanks for your response, it definitely gave me a much better understanding of the issue :)
    – Dreams
    Mar 9, 2017 at 4:54
  • interestingly I have found the linux kubectl (as per the link you mentioned) to run on big sur... Mar 28, 2021 at 18:46
8

I just faced this concept again. It is absolutely possible but let's don't give "cluster-admin privileges in with ClusterRole that container for security reasons.

Let's say we want to deploy a pod in the cluster with access to view and create pods only in a specific namespace in the cluster. In this case, a ServiceAccount could look like:

apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1beta1
kind: RoleBinding
metadata:
  name: spinupcontainers
subjects:
- kind: ServiceAccount
  name: spinupcontainers
  namespace: <YOUR_NAMESPACE>
roleRef:
  kind: Role
  name: spinupcontainers
  apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
---
apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1beta1
kind: Role
metadata:
  name: spinupcontainers
  # "namespace" omitted if was ClusterRoles because are not namespaced
  namespace: <YOUR_NAMESPACE>
  labels:
    k8s-app: <YOUR_APP_LABEL>
rules:
#
# Give here only the privileges you need
#
- apiGroups: [""]
  resources:
  - pods
  verbs:
  - create
  - update
  - patch
  - delete
  - get
  - watch
  - list
---
apiVersion: v1
kind: ServiceAccount
metadata:
  name: spinupcontainers
  namespace: <MY_NAMESPACE>
  labels:
    k8s-app: <MY_APP_LABEL>
---

If you apply the service account in your deployment with serviceAccountName: spinupcontainers in the container specs you don't need to mount any additional volumes secrets or attach manually certifications. kubectl client will get the required tokens from /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount. Then you can test if is working with something like:

$ kubectl exec -it <your-container-with-the-attached-privs> -- /kubectl get pods -n <YOUR_NAMESPACE>
NAME.        READY   STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
pod1-0       1/1     Running   0          6d17h
pod2-0       1/1     Running   0          6d16h
pod3-0       1/1     Running   0          6d17h
pod3-2       1/1     Running   0          67s

or permission denied:

$ kubectl exec -it <your-container-with-the-attached-privs> -- /kubectl get pods -n kube-system
Error from server (Forbidden): pods is forbidden: User "system:serviceaccount:default:spinupcontainers" cannot list resource "pods" in API group "" in the namespace "kube-system"
command terminated with exit code 1

Tested on:

$ kubectl exec -it <your-container-with-the-attached-privs> -- /kubectl versionClient Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"17", GitVersion:"v1.17.0", GitCommit:"70132b0f130acc0bed193d9ba59dd186f0e634cf", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2019-12-07T21:20:10Z", GoVersion:"go1.13.4", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}
Server Version: version.Info{Major:"1", Minor:"17", GitVersion:"v1.17.0", GitCommit:"70132b0f130acc0bed193d9ba59dd186f0e634cf", GitTreeState:"clean", BuildDate:"2019-12-07T21:12:17Z", GoVersion:"go1.13.4", Compiler:"gc", Platform:"linux/amd64"}
1
  • Can you shows us the Dockerfile(spinupcontainers) you configured
    – Dani
    May 18 at 9:39
2

Combined from all above. This did the trick for me. Retrieving all pods from within a container.

curl --insecure -H "Authorization: Bearer $(cat /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount/token)"  https://$KUBERNETES_SERVICE_HOST:$KUBERNETES_SERVICE_PORT/api/v1/namespaces/default/pods

See https://kubernetes.io/docs/reference/generated/kubernetes-api/v1.21/#-strong-read-operations-pod-v1-core-strong- for the REST API.

0

To run kubectl commands inside a container. It would take 3 steps

  1. Install kubectl
RUN printf '[kubernetes] \nname = Kubernetes\nbaseurl = https://packages.cloud.google.com/yum/repos/kubernetes-el7-x86_64\nenabled = 1\ngpgcheck = 1\nrepo_gpgcheck=1\ngpgkey=https://packages.cloud.google.com/yum/doc/yum-key.gpg https://packages.cloud.google.com/yum/doc/rpm-package-key.gpg' \
  | tee /etc/yum.repos.d/kubernetes.repo \
  && cat  /etc/yum.repos.d/kubernetes.repo \
  && yum install -y kubectl

  1. Create ClusterAdminRole Binding role for service account
apiVersion: v1
kind: ServiceAccount
metadata:
  name: mysa-admin-sa
  namespace: mysa
---
apiVersion: rbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1beta1
kind: ClusterRoleBinding
metadata:
  name: mysa-admin-sa
roleRef:
  apiGroup: rbac.authorization.k8s.io
  kind: ClusterRole
  name: cluster-admin
subjects:
  - kind: ServiceAccount
    name: mysa-admin-sa
    namespace: mysa

3- Example of cronjob configuration

apiVersion: batch/v1beta1
kind: CronJob
metadata:
  name: scaleup
  namespace: myapp
spec:
  schedule: "00 5 * * 1-5"
  jobTemplate:
    spec:
      template:
        spec:
          serviceAccountName: mysa-admin-sa
          restartPolicy: OnFailure
          containers:
          - name: scale-up
            image: myimage:test
            imagePullPolicy: Always
            command: ["/bin/sh"]
            args: ["-c", "mykubcmd_script >>/mylog.log"]
2
  • How you configured the dockerfile for docker image to kubectl etc...
    – Dani
    May 18 at 9:43
  • you would need to have kubectl client installed on the docker image. For e.g. for centos based OS you need to add this line in Dockerfile. RUN printf '[kubernetes] \nname = Kubernetes\nbaseurl = https://packages.cloud.google.com/yum/repos/kubernetes-el7-x86_64\nenabled = 1\ngpgcheck = 1\nrepo_gpgcheck=1\ngpgkey=https://packages.cloud.google.com/yum/doc/yum-key.gpg https://packages.cloud.google.com/yum/doc/rpm-package-key.gpg' \ | tee /etc/yum.repos.d/kubernetes.repo \ && cat /etc/yum.repos.d/kubernetes.repo \ && yum install -y kubectl
    – Amit Singh
    May 19 at 10:49
-4
  1. To run a command inside a pod with single container use below command

kubectl --exec -it <pod-name> -- <command-name>

  1. To run a command inside a pod with multiple containers use below command

kubectl --exec -it <pod-name> -c <container-name> -- <command-name>

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