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I am currently coding my Computer Science coursework, which is a diary and week planner that takes input from the user into a sqlite3 database, then when the name is searched, it outputs every record that matches with the query to the GUI (Tkinter). Currently, it prints all the rows on one line, however I want them to output one row, then transfer to the next line.

def searched():
    Main_Screen.delete('1.0', END)
    searched_for = search.get()
    timeslot = cursor.execute('''SELECT * FROM dates WHERE Name = ?''',(searched_for,))
    list1 = list(cursor.fetchall())
    list1 = str(list1)
    cursor.execute('''SELECT COUNT(*) FROM dates WHERE Name = ?''',(searched_for,))
    result = cursor.fetchone()
    conn.commit()
    print(result)
    str.replace(')','\n', END )

    Main_Screen.insert(tkinter.END, list1)

I tested using the keyword 'test', and got this through my GUI:

[('2017-06-06', 'test', '11:00:00', '12:00:00'), ('2017-06-    06', 'test', '10:00:00', '12:00:00'), ('2017-05-04', 'test', '11:00:00', '16:00:00'), ('2017-04-03', 'test', '11:00:00', '14:00:00')]

Where am I going wrong?

  • Why can you not just iterate through list1 with a for loop? Also, don't format your queries like that, it's open to SQL injection and '''"''' is really difficult to read. cursor.execute('''SELECT * FROM dates WHERE Name = ?''', (searched_for,)). – roganjosh Mar 7 '17 at 12:47
  • Thanks for the suggestion. I have had to teach myself quite abit of Python and all of the sql. How would I iterate the list with a for loop? – coder188642 Mar 7 '17 at 12:52
  • I'm struggling to pass the values to the GUI properly. I want the code to output the first batch of data (date, name, start time, end time) then go to a new line and repeat. At the moment it just outputs all of them on one line. – coder188642 Mar 7 '17 at 12:53
  • Ok, I wasn't clear how you've got to using tkinter without covering loops. See the examples here. Relevant is Lists as an iterable and if you wanted individual items of text for each result e.g. '2017-06-06' on its own, see Lists of lists below it (the tuple will behave exactly as a list in this case). Note that for the former example, x in for x in collection has no significant meaning and could be substituted for whatever you like e.g. for item in collection or for record in collection. – roganjosh Mar 7 '17 at 12:57
  • How would I implement this using the Main_Screen.insert() function? To be clear, Main_Screen is a textbox widget. – coder188642 Mar 7 '17 at 13:04
2

When you do list1 = list(cursor.fetchall()) you return a list of values from your database, as you see in your output:

[('2017-06-06', 'test', '11:00:00', '12:00:00'), ('2017-06-    06', 'test', '10:00:00', '12:00:00'), ('2017-05-04', 'test', '11:00:00', '16:00:00'), ('2017-04-03', 'test', '11:00:00', '14:00:00')]

You don't want to wrap this as a string (list1 = str(list1)), because that results in the output you're seeing - you want to combine the results in a neat way for displaying.

The str.join() method combines elements of an iterable by putting the string you specify between them. So, if you were to do, say, '-'.join(['Dan Simons', 'asongtoruin']), your output would be Dan Simons-asongtoruin.

As your fetchall call returns a list of tuples, we need to us this method twice:

  1. To put spaces between the columns for each row
  2. To put each row on a new line

Step 1, then, would be something like ' '.join(row) for each of your rows. For example,

' '.join(('2017-06-06', 'test', '11:00:00', '12:00:00'))

would give us 2017-06-06 test 11:00:00 12:00:00 as a string.

If we use a list comprehension, we can do all of these in one go, like so:

joined = [' '.join(row) for row in list1]`

which would give us:

['2017-06-06 test 11:00:00 12:00:00', '2017-06-    06 test 10:00:00 12:00:00', '2017-05-04 test 11:00:00 16:00:00', '2017-04-03 test 11:00:00 14:00:00']

We can then put each one onto a new line by using '\n'.join(joined), and we can even do both steps in one line. Your code could then become:

def searched():
    Main_Screen.delete('1.0', END)
    searched_for = search.get()
    timeslot = cursor.execute('''SELECT * FROM dates WHERE Name = ?''',(searched_for,))
    list1 = cursor.fetchall()
    cursor.execute('''SELECT COUNT(*) FROM dates WHERE Name = ?''',(searched_for,))
    result = cursor.fetchone()
    # conn.commit() - probably not needed
    print(result)
    output_text = '\n'.join([' '.join(row) for row in list1])

    Main_Screen.insert(tkinter.END, output_text)

This should insert the block of text returned form your database into the widget (though without seeing the wider code I can't confirm it)

  • 1
    +1 I completely missed list1 = str(list1) in the question. A small point is that conn.commit() can be removed since you don't need it after SELECT queries and list() is unnecessary in list(cursor.fetchall()). – roganjosh Mar 7 '17 at 14:25
  • 1
    @roganjosh agreed - though without visibility of the wider code we can't know if that conn.commit() does actually commit something. It seems unlikely though, I agree – asongtoruin Mar 7 '17 at 14:28
  • @asongtoruin it worked, thanks so much:) – coder188642 Mar 7 '17 at 14:36

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