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Difference between "return" at the end of the method and "return" placed before the end of the method in java?.

If we place the "return" statement before the end of the method like the following code, what will happen?

boolean sample()
{
  boolean b=false;
  int a=0;

  if(a==0)
    return(true);            //This return what happens
  return(false);
}

Whether it will increase the burdon of the system than the normal "return" at the end of the method?

6 Answers 6

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No, it makes no difference at all.

Some people like to structure their methods to only have a single return statement, always at the end - personally I tend to return as soon as the code knows the result. I find that ends up with more readable code, particularly if you can tell the result immediately in some cases (e.g. "if the input is null, the output is null") but there's significant processing in others.

7
  • It tends to reduce the levels of nesting required. I agree, its usually more readable. Nov 24, 2010 at 11:30
  • It reduces the levels of nesting at the cost of obfuscating the code's structure. So no, it doesn't make the code more readable, it makes it appear more readable, but that is a lie.
    – JeremyP
    Nov 24, 2010 at 14:23
  • 1
    @JeremyP: I'd say it's quite the opposite - it makes the paths through the code much clearer, because as soon as you see that you're going to return, you know what's happened. You don't need to read the rest of the method just in case it starts doing something relevant again. I've worked with code in both styles, and the mantra of "one return point" has been awful for readability.
    – Jon Skeet
    Nov 24, 2010 at 14:26
  • @Jon Skeet: No it doesn't. If you put a return in the middle of a method, you have added another code path. It's like the rest of the code is enclosed in a big if statement, but the indentation doesn't reflect that.
    – JeremyP
    Nov 24, 2010 at 15:02
  • @JeremyP: Yes - but it's obvious what "return" means when you read the code. I prefer not to have big if statements of that kind. This is particularly important for return statements at the start of methods for "early out" situations. It's easy to read what's going on, and the main body of the code ends up being much simpler IMO. I dare say I won't convince you of the potential readability benefits of early returns, and you're certainly not going to convince me :)
    – Jon Skeet
    Nov 24, 2010 at 15:52
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Difference between "return" at the end of the method and "return" placed before the end of the method in java?

There is no semantic difference.

The only think to watch is that an unconditional return statement can result in statements following it being unreachable; e.g.

    int a = 0;
    return a == 0;
    int b = 1;       // compilation error here ... statement is unreachable
    return b == 1;

Whether it will increase the burdon of the system than the normal "return" at the end of the method.

No it won't. The generated bytecode (and native code) can have multiple return instructions if necessary.

However, for clarity / readability it is better to write these two statements:

    if (a == 0) return (true);
    return (false);

as a single statement:

    return a == 0;

and there's no need to use parentheses in Java return statements.

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All returns are alike. In your example, you don't need more than one return.

return a == 0;

I would suggest you not worry about performance issues, until you can see/measure that you have a problem. Most of the performance issues people worry about in forums won't make any real difference.

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Multiple returns are simply multiple exist points from your method, they do not put any "extra burden" on the system and they are no different than "normal" returns.

The method will exit on when it reaches the first return and no other code will be executed after it executes the return statement. Control will then return to the calling method

0

What Jon Skeet said is correct, if the function got the correct result then let it return the result immediately, rather than waiting the function to do unnecessary checking, looping, etc. This makes the function get faster result + better readability

0

There's nothing inherently wrong with having multiple return's within a method, it can be elegant to do so. Most recursive functions will have muliple returns:

public String flattenTree(Node currentNode, String stringSoFar) {
    // do our work on this node
    stringSoFar = stringSoFar + currentNode.getName();

    // end condition- if we've got no children left we're done so leave now
    if (currentNode.countChildren() ==0) {
       return stringSoFar;
    }

    // recursive condition- keep digging through the children of our current node
    for (int i=0; i<currentNode.countChildren(); i++) {
         stringSoFar = stringSoFar + flattenTree(currentNode.getChild(i));
    }
    return stringSoFar;
}

Looks nice and clean, and lets you clearly mark out your end condition... I quite like this approach simply because it's built to look like you were taught to do recursion back at school...

Nothing wrong with compacting that into a single return:

    public String flattenTree(Node currentNode, String stringSoFar) {
    // do our work on this node
    stringSoFar = stringSoFar + currentNode.getName();

    // loop through children if neccessary
    for (int i=0; i<currentNode.countChildren(); i++) {
         stringSoFar = stringSoFar + flattenTree(currentNode.getChild(i));
    }

    return stringSoFar;
}

Less code, arguably better, arguably less obvious where your end-case lies...

In terms of performance I couldn't claim to know that one is more/less performant than the other, but I have to say that unless I'm working on an uber-performance-critical piece of code I always pick readability over performance, and I would suggest that at least in this hypothetical example you pick multiple returns for ease of reading.

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