Before trying the official release of Visual Studio 2017, I installed Visual Studio 2017 RC and found that my existing Git Repository is not recognized. Even though I made sure that the Source Control plugin is set to Git as shown in the following picture.

enter image description here

Then, I thought, maybe it is just because of RC edition. Anyway, today official version of Visual Studio 2017 released and I have installed again. I see the same problem. Did anyone face the same issue? What is the solution to this problem? I do not think I need to install Git Extension separately as looks like Visual studio already has that extension preinstalled.

  • Can you provide more details around this? What is not recognized? Did you open a solution contained in a Git repository and the integration did not activate? Did you add the repository via Team Explorer and it didn't find the repository? – jamill Mar 8 '17 at 15:05
  • @jamill, simply it does not recognize existing git repository. Then, if I try to create a new git repository from a fresh new project, that does not work too. It shows the Git related UI but the real repository does not get created. But anyway, I thought, it could be a known issue that I am not the only one who faced it. Is Git extension working properly from Visual Studio 2017 at your machine ? – Emran Hussain Mar 8 '17 at 17:41
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    I have the exact same problem – quin16 Mar 9 '17 at 9:10
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    Experienced same problem. – VIRTUAL-VOID Mar 9 '17 at 17:13
  • I created a fresh project and it shows as being under git control, but I can't get it to show me source control options for a pre-existing project. – Auspex Jun 22 '17 at 11:26

I had the same issue when running VS 2017 in administrator mode and attempting to open a repository in VSTS git. This post actually helped me find the answer

What worked for me was to create an environment variable "HOME" with the value of "C:\" (my source code directory). Setting this environment variable and restarting VS 2017 seems to have fixed it. All the best!

  • Yup, worked like a charm. – santos Feb 16 at 20:03

Consider using MSVS 2017 to allow git to ignore some files not necessary as source code.

Team Explorer - Changes window below.

enter image description here

Composed image MSVS2017, Error Message, and using

Ignore this local item

I used this technique to ignore two files. You may also need to press the refresh button which is the blue circular arc arrow in the image above. This will change the .gitignore text file if you want more details.

Blah.VC.db and Blah.VC.OpenDB ignored.

I may improve this answer. I need more testing. I may not be able to recreate problem easily for further confidence. Please excuse the lack of clarity in the interests of time. So far successful.

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    This doesn't begin to approach the OP's question. He can't get a project recognized, so ignoring anything in the project isn't even an option. – Auspex Jun 22 '17 at 11:31

Check out Easy Git Integration Tools. Much better tools than Team Explorer, and integrates with GitExtensions, works with VS2017 https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=jzoss.GitSourceControlProvider2015

New Feature Highlights

  • Added option to auto-add projects and to the git repository when you add them to the project!
  • Switch and create branches, switch git repositories, and open the pending changes window all from the status bar!
  • Initialize new projects from the status bar.

Features

  • Display file status in solution explorer and solution navigator
  • Multiple repository support.
  • Display repository status e.g. in the middle of merging, patching, rebase and bisecting
  • Enable/disable plug-in through visual studio's source control plug-in selection
  • No source code control information stored in solution or project file
  • Initialize new git repository and generate .gitignore
  • Integrates with Git for Windows
  • Integrates with Git Extensions
  • Integrates with TortoiseGit
  • Git - Pending Changes Tool Window
  • Git - View History Tool Window
  • Options page
  • Thanks for the info. As Visual Studio already provides Git built in, why this extension should be used over the built in one ? Can you provide some reasons ? I mean, something good that Visual Studio does not have but this one has!. Also, isn;t there any feature missing in that solution which is available in visual studio ? – Emran Hussain Apr 4 '17 at 23:44
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    Install it and see for yourself. Easy Git allows you to select which files you want to check in, which I think is awesome. It is more like Webstorm / Jet's Git interface. I found the VS one to be clunky and Easy Git to much more user friendly. – Enkode Apr 4 '17 at 23:58
  • I find the VS client to be very simple and useful and I used EasyGit for years. But the VS client isn't much use if it refuses to recognize my pre-existing repos. – Auspex Jun 22 '17 at 11:28

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