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I encountered the following statement, and mind-farted.

++(*q)->len;

q appears to be a contiguous array of memory, which by the looks of it, appears to be an array of pointers to structs; getting to grips with a new code base, sorry for the vagueness.

With the above statement are we dereferencing q, to get the value which is a pointer, which we then dereference and access the field len, which we then increment? In code, what i'm trying to say is this ++((*q)->len), would be the explicit execution.

Or should I be reading this as, we dereferenced q and then incremented the value, which we then dereference and get the len field, of the struct that is one ahead of q before the incrementation. Again, in code, what i'm trying to say is this (++(*q))->len, would be the explicit execution.

Any guidance would be grand

UPDATE: I guess the first parse makes sense ++((*q)->len), as if it was the second case, we would get the value of len and then do nothing with it.

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*q doesn't really mean it's contiguous array of memory. The answer is it increments the len field of the structure object at memory location q

  • He's not inferring it to be a contiguous array based off the statement, though--that's what he's gleaned from the context where he found this statement. – jaggedSpire Mar 8 '17 at 16:16
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    I know that, I'm telling you that q is pointing to a contiguous array in memory. – izaak_pyzaak Mar 8 '17 at 16:17
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    @izaak_pyzaak Rather than describe q in words with "appears to be", post could better show what q is with code, like its declaration. – chux Mar 8 '17 at 16:19

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