5

I'm trying to create a method that returns an iterator over the values of HashMap that is boxed inside a RefCell, but i'm having an error where Ref returned by RefCell::borrow doesn't live long enough for iterator to be returned from the method. Here's my code:

use std::rc::Rc;
use std::cell::RefCell;
use std::collections::HashMap;
use std::collections::hash_map::Values;

struct Foo {
    map: Rc<RefCell<HashMap<i32, i32>>>,
}

impl Foo {
    fn iter(&self) -> Values<i32, i32> {
        self.map.borrow().values()
    }
}

fn main() {
    let foo = Foo {
        map: Rc::new(RefCell::new(HashMap::new()))
    };

    for v in foo.iter() {
        println!("{}", v)
    }
}

Compilation error:

rustc 1.15.1 (021bd294c 2017-02-08)
error: borrowed value does not live long enough
  --> <anon>:12:9
   |
12 |         self.map.borrow().values()
   |         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ does not live long enough
13 |     }
   |     - temporary value only lives until here
   |

How do I return a reference to something inside a RefCell without breaking encapsulation? suggests creating a guard that incapsulates Ref and provides an interface for accessing the underlying value, but what I need to do is to return an iterator object (Values<'a, K, V>) that already incapsulates a plain reference to a HashMap.

My main problem is that I have a runtime tracked reference Ref<T> while I need a plain reference to create an iterator. Ref::map exposes a plain reference for mapping, but it requires the mapper function to return another reference which is impossible here. Should I redo the entire iterator functionality to work with Ref or is there a better way?

1

1 Answer 1

5

You cannot do this.

The ultimate problem is that std::collections::hash_map::Values holds a reference, but you don't have "just" a reference. You have the smart pointer Ref.

The easiest solution I know of is to invert the code:

impl Foo {
    fn with_iter<F, T>(&self, f: F) -> T
    where
        F: FnOnce(Values<i32, i32>) -> T,
    {
        f(self.map.borrow().values())
    }
}

fn main() {
    let foo = Foo {
        map: Rc::new(RefCell::new(HashMap::new())),
    };

    foo.with_iter(|i| {
        for v in i {
            println!("{}", v)
        }
    })
}

Here, the Values iterator no longer needs to outlive the result of borrow, so there's no additional complexity.

If you are OK with leaking your implementation, you can return the Ref:

impl Foo {
    fn iter(&self) -> Ref<'_, HashMap<i32, i32>> {
        self.map.borrow()
    }
}
for v in foo.iter().values() {
    println!("{}", v)
}

In newer versions of Rust, you can return an unnamed type that implements Deref:

use std::ops::Deref;

impl Foo {
    fn iter(&self) -> impl Deref<Target = HashMap<i32, i32>> + '_ {
        self.map.borrow()
    }
}

See also:

3
  • (You can probably do this with unsafe code, but my brain isn't showing me the way at the moment).
    – Shepmaster
    Mar 8, 2017 at 18:55
  • With RefCell::as_ptr, perhaps?
    – trent
    Mar 8, 2017 at 20:54
  • Wait, no... you'd also have to fiddle with the contents of the RefCell to make sure nobody else borrowed it as mutable while the Values existed. Tricksy
    – trent
    Mar 8, 2017 at 20:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.