14

Does C# support compiling filters? How do filters even work or what do they do?

Like reflector decompiles a filter as

try
{
}
catch(Exception e) when (?)
{
}
4
24

Since C# 6 you can now do this.

try { … }
catch (MyException e) when (myfilter(e))
{
    …
}

This is different from using an if statement from within the catch block, using exception filters will not unwind the stack.

8

C# did not support exception filters like VB does until C# 6. As for how they work, see Eric Lippert's "Finally" Does Not Mean "Immediately"

Starting in C# 6, exception filters are supported, as the C# FAQ demonstrates:

try { … } 
catch (MyException e) when (myfilter(e)) 
{ 
    … 
}

If the parenthesized expression after ‘if’ [now when] evaluates to true, the catch block is run, otherwise the exception keeps going.

Exception filters are preferable to catching and rethrowing because they leave the stack unharmed. If the exception later causes the stack to be dumped, you can see where it originally came from, rather than just the last place it was rethrown.

It is also a common and accepted form of “abuse” to use exception filters for side effects; e.g. logging. They can inspect an exception “flying by” without intercepting its course. In those cases, the filter will often be a call to a false-returning helper function which executes the side effects:

private static bool Log(Exception e) { /* log it */ ; return false; }
…
try { … }
catch (Exception e) when (Log(e)) {}

Thanks to Mafii for the link to the C# 6 documentation.

8
  • Okay, so filter is basically just an if statement and if it is not met it rethrows it?
    – Will
    Nov 24 '10 at 15:26
  • 3
    No it's subtly different since a real filter doesn't even catch it if it decides to handle the exception, whereas a workaround with an if catches and re-throws it. This has slightly different semantics related to stack-unrolling. Nov 24 '10 at 15:34
  • It's also different in when it runs. Filters run before catch blocks, even if those filters are defined deeper in the callstack. Aug 14 '14 at 22:21
  • This answer is no longer current. C# 5 does support exception filters. See my answer. Aug 14 '14 at 22:23
  • 4
    C# 5 does not support exception filters. C# 6 does and it hasn't yet officially shipped.
    – i3arnon
    Nov 30 '14 at 10:29
4

Exception filters support in C# is introduced in C# 6 (Visual Studio "Dev14"):

try
{
    throw new ApplicationException("1");
}
catch (ApplicationException ex) when (ex.Message == "2")
{
    // this one won't execute.
}
catch (ApplicationException ex) when (ex.Message == "1")
{
    // this one will execute
}
1
  • 2
    if has been replaced with when in the final edition of C#6
    – Mafii
    Mar 29 '16 at 19:48
0

While catching exceptions, if you want to handle the exceptions differently then you can use Exception Filter
-- After C# 6.0
-- After VB 7.1 Using WHEN

1) C# Sample After C# 6.0

try
{
    throw new CustomException { Severity = 100 };
}
catch (CustomException ex) when (ex.Severity > 50)
{
    Console.WriteLine("*BING BING* WARNING *BING BING*");
}
catch (CustomException ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Whooops!");
}

Note : Keep in mind that the order matters

2) C# Sample Before C# 6.0

try
{
    throw new CustomException { Severity = 100 };
}
catch (CustomException ex)
{
   if (ex.Severity > 50)
    {
       Console.WriteLine("*BING BING* WARNING *BING BING*");
    }
   else
    {
       Console.WriteLine("Whooops!");
    }
}

Since this piece of code is equivalent to the previous one. means, they are equivalent, right? --- "But No they are not equivalent"
NOTE : exception filters don’t unwind the stack

Read it more from Here

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