352

How to append one array to another without comparing their keys?

$a = array( 'a', 'b' );
$b = array( 'c', 'd' );

At the end it should be: Array( [0]=>a [1]=>b [2]=>c [3]=>d ) If I use something like [] or array_push, it will cause one of these results:

Array( [0]=>a [1]=>b [2]=>Array( [0]=>c [1]=>d ) )
//or
Array( [0]=>c [1]=>d )

It just should be something, doing this, but in a more elegant way:

foreach ( $b AS $var )
    $a[] = $var;
5
  • 25
    array_merge ($a, $b) should do exactly what you want, at least with PHP 5+.
    – tloach
    Nov 24, 2010 at 16:15
  • 1
    (related) + Operator for Array in PHP
    – Gordon
    Nov 24, 2010 at 16:17
  • 6
    none of the outputs you posted come from array_merge(); the output of array_merge(); should be exaclty what you need: print_r(array_merge($a,$b)); // outputs => Array ( [0] => a [1] => b [2] => c [3] => d )
    – acm
    Nov 24, 2010 at 16:18
  • 4
    I totally disagree with the term "append". Append really means that items of one array become elements of another (destination) array which might already has some elements, therefore changing the destination array. Merge allocates a new array and COPIES elements of both arrays, while append actually means reusing the destination array elements without extra memory allocation.
    – tishma
    Jul 23, 2014 at 16:00
  • All methods are described on the page [PHP-docs] in "User Contributed Notes" [1]: php.net/manual/ru/function.array-push.php Aug 15, 2021 at 21:08

11 Answers 11

523

array_merge is the elegant way:

$a = array('a', 'b');
$b = array('c', 'd');
$merge = array_merge($a, $b); 
// $merge is now equals to array('a','b','c','d');

Doing something like:

$merge = $a + $b;
// $merge now equals array('a','b')

Will not work, because the + operator does not actually merge them. If they $a has the same keys as $b, it won't do anything.

2
  • 23
    Just be careful if your keys are not a numbers but strings, From doc: If the input arrays have the same string keys, then the later value for that key will overwrite the previous one Feb 5, 2016 at 1:53
  • or use modern splat operator as @bstoney answer stackoverflow.com/a/37065301/962634
    – basil
    Jan 24, 2019 at 10:30
137

Another way to do this in PHP 5.6+ would be to use the ... token

$a = array('a', 'b');
$b = array('c', 'd');

array_push($a, ...$b);

// $a is now equals to array('a','b','c','d');

This will also work with any Traversable

$a = array('a', 'b');
$b = new ArrayIterator(array('c', 'd'));

array_push($a, ...$b);

// $a is now equals to array('a','b','c','d');

A warning though:

  • in PHP versions before 7.3 this will cause a fatal error if $b is an empty array or not traversable e.g. not an array
  • in PHP 7.3 a warning will be raised if $b is not traversable
5
  • Which term is used for such syntax? (E.g. in JS it is called spread operator ) Or can you provide link to docs?
    – basil
    Jan 6, 2019 at 6:31
  • 5
    @basil you will find ... commonly referred to as the splat operator in php. Jan 21, 2019 at 15:54
  • 3
    The most useful answer when looking for a simple way to append an array to itself without overriding any previous elements. Jul 15, 2019 at 8:17
  • 1
    array_push accepts a single argument since php 7.3, which prevents errors with empty arrays.
    – vctls
    Sep 19, 2019 at 9:07
  • 2
    A little note: This doesn't work with associative arrays. (Fatal Error: Cannot unpack array with string keys)
    – Turab
    Dec 21, 2021 at 15:08
39

Why not use

$appended = array_merge($a,$b); 

Why don't you want to use this, the correct, built-in method.

3
  • Where does OP say he "doesn't want to use" array_merge()...? Apr 1, 2017 at 0:49
  • 5
    @KittenCodings - Read the "edit history" of the question... the original question was entitled PHP append one array to another (not array_merge or array_push)... subsequently modified to PHP append one array to another (not array_merge or +) before changing to its current title
    – Mark Baker
    Apr 1, 2017 at 0:57
  • 2
    @MarkBaker Wow! I didn't know SO has an edit history! Sorry about that, and thanks, this changes a lot and somewhat prevents moderators from putting words into peoples mouths, I previously felt like some questions were defaced and their comments invalidated by content removed/edited, though I imagine most people probably don't read the edit history, I sure as heck will from now on Apr 2, 2017 at 5:51
27

It's a pretty old post, but I want to add something about appending one array to another:

If

  • one or both arrays have associative keys
  • the keys of both arrays don't matter

you can use array functions like this:

array_merge(array_values($array), array_values($appendArray));

array_merge doesn't merge numeric keys so it appends all values of $appendArray. While using native php functions instead of a foreach-loop, it should be faster on arrays with a lot of elements.

Addition 2019-12-13: Since PHP 7.4, there is the possibility to append or prepend arrays the Array Spread Operator way:

    $a = [3, 4];
    $b = [1, 2, ...$a];

As before, keys can be an issue with this new feature:

    $a = ['a' => 3, 'b' => 4];
    $b = ['c' => 1, 'a' => 2, ...$a];

"Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Cannot unpack array with string keys"

    $a = [3 => 3, 4 => 4];
    $b = [1 => 1, 4 => 2, ...$a];

array(4) { [1]=> int(1) [4]=> int(2) [5]=> int(3) [6]=> int(4) }

    $a = [1 => 1, 2 => 2];
    $b = [...$a, 3 => 3, 1 => 4];

array(3) { [0]=> int(1) [1]=> int(4) [3]=> int(3) }

3
  • 1
    This should also have the advantage of leaving the input arrays untouched. May 4, 2016 at 11:41
  • 1
    Yes it is more safe just in case to extract the array_values so that you don't merge into the same keys. May 12, 2016 at 19:55
  • Really old answer, so how do you get around the issue with the keys? Jan 3, 2021 at 0:21
19
<?php
// Example 1 [Merging associative arrays. When two or more arrays have same key
// then the last array key value overrides the others one]

$array1 = array("a" => "JAVA", "b" => "ASP");
$array2 = array("c" => "C", "b" => "PHP");
echo " <br> Example 1 Output: <br>";
print_r(array_merge($array1,$array2));

// Example 2 [When you want to merge arrays having integer keys and
//want to reset integer keys to start from 0 then use array_merge() function]

$array3 =array(5 => "CSS",6 => "CSS3");
$array4 =array(8 => "JAVASCRIPT",9 => "HTML");
echo " <br> Example 2 Output: <br>";
print_r(array_merge($array3,$array4));

// Example 3 [When you want to merge arrays having integer keys and
// want to retain integer keys as it is then use PLUS (+) operator to merge arrays]

$array5 =array(5 => "CSS",6 => "CSS3");
$array6 =array(8 => "JAVASCRIPT",9 => "HTML");
echo " <br> Example 3 Output: <br>";
print_r($array5+$array6);

// Example 4 [When single array pass to array_merge having integer keys
// then the array return by array_merge have integer keys starting from 0]

$array7 =array(3 => "CSS",4 => "CSS3");
echo " <br> Example 4 Output: <br>";
print_r(array_merge($array7));
?>

Output:

Example 1 Output:
Array
(
[a] => JAVA
[b] => PHP
[c] => C
)

Example 2 Output:
Array
(
[0] => CSS
[1] => CSS3
[2] => JAVASCRIPT
[3] => HTML
)

Example 3 Output:
Array
(
[5] => CSS
[6] => CSS3
[8] => JAVASCRIPT
[9] => HTML
)

Example 4 Output:
Array
(
[0] => CSS
[1] => CSS3
)

Reference Source Code

1
  • you are quite thorough with your answer; of import for me is the example noting that when keys are the same (for associative arrays), array_merge might behave contrary to expectation for those who simply takes it at its name.
    – Ajowi
    Jul 18, 2021 at 9:06
14

Following on from answer's by bstoney and Snark I did some tests on the various methods:

// Test 1 (array_merge)
$array1 = $array2 = array_fill(0, 50000, 'aa');
$start = microtime(true);
$array1 = array_merge($array1, $array2);
printf("Test 1: %.06f\n", microtime(true) - $start);

// Test2 (foreach)
$array1 = $array2 = array_fill(0, 50000, 'aa');
$start = microtime(true);
foreach ($array2 as $v) {
    $array1[] = $v;
}
printf("Test 2: %.06f\n", microtime(true) - $start);

// Test 3 (... token)
// PHP 5.6+ and produces error if $array2 is empty
$array1 = $array2 = array_fill(0, 50000, 'aa');
$start = microtime(true);
array_push($array1, ...$array2);
printf("Test 3: %.06f\n", microtime(true) - $start);

Which produces:

Test 1: 0.002717 
Test 2: 0.006922 
Test 3: 0.004744

ORIGINAL: I believe as of PHP 7, method 3 is a significantly better alternative due to the way foreach loops now act, which is to make a copy of the array being iterated over.

Whilst method 3 isn't strictly an answer to the criteria of 'not array_push' in the question, it is one line and the most high performance in all respects, I think the question was asked before the ... syntax was an option.

UPDATE 25/03/2020: I've updated the test which was flawed as the variables weren't reset. Interestingly (or confusingly) the results now show as test 1 being the fastest, where it was the slowest, having gone from 0.008392 to 0.002717! This can only be down to PHP updates, as this wouldn't have been affected by the testing flaw.

So, the saga continues, I will start using array_merge from now on!

2
  • 3
    You aren't resetting array1 before each test, so each test has 50,000 more items than the previous.
    – Dakusan
    Feb 22, 2020 at 6:53
  • Amazing after so many years you are first person to pick me up on this, thank you, I'll do a retest shortly :) Feb 24, 2020 at 11:54
13

For big array, is better to concatenate without array_merge, for avoid a memory copy.

$array1 = array_fill(0,50000,'aa');
$array2 = array_fill(0,100,'bb');

// Test 1 (array_merge)
$start = microtime(true);
$r1 = array_merge($array1, $array2);
echo sprintf("Test 1: %.06f\n", microtime(true) - $start);

// Test2 (avoid copy)
$start = microtime(true);
foreach ($array2 as $v) {
    $array1[] = $v;
}
echo sprintf("Test 2: %.06f\n", microtime(true) - $start);


// Test 1: 0.004963
// Test 2: 0.000038
1
  • echo sprintf() should never exist in anyone's code. Just write printf() without the echo. May 12 at 2:00
8

Since PHP 7.4 you can use the ... operator. This is also known as the splat operator in other languages, including Ruby.

$parts = ['apple', 'pear'];
$fruits = ['banana', 'orange', ...$parts, 'watermelon'];
var_dump($fruits);

Output

array(5) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "banana"
    [1]=>
    string(6) "orange"
    [2]=>
    string(5) "apple"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "pear"
    [4]=>
    string(10) "watermelon"
}

Splat operator should have better performance than array_merge. That’s not only because the splat operator is a language structure while array_merge is a function, but also because compile time optimization can be performant for constant arrays.

Moreover, we can use the splat operator syntax everywhere in the array, as normal elements can be added before or after the splat operator.

$arr1 = [1, 2, 3];
$arr2 = [4, 5, 6];
$arr3 = [...$arr1, ...$arr2];
$arr4 = [...$arr1, ...$arr3, 7, 8, 9];
1
3

Before PHP7 you can use:

array_splice($a, count($a), 0, $b);

array_splice() operates with reference to array (1st argument) and puts array (4th argument) values in place of list of values started from 2nd argument and number of 3rd argument. When we set 2nd argument as end of source array and 3rd as zero we append 4th argument values to 1st argument

0
0

if you want to merge empty array with existing new value. You must initialize it first.

$products = array();
//just example
for($brand_id=1;$brand_id<=3;$brand_id++){
  array_merge($products,getByBrand($brand_id));
}
// it will create empty array
print_r($a);

//check if array of products is empty
for($brand_id=1;$brand_id<=3;$brand_id++){
  if(empty($products)){
    $products = getByBrand($brand_id);
  }else{
    array_merge($products,getByBrand($brand_id));
  }
}
// it will create array of products

Hope its help.

0

foreach loop is faster than array_merge to append values to an existing array, so choose the loop instead if you want to add an array to the end of another.

// Create an array of arrays
$chars = [];
for ($i = 0; $i < 15000; $i++) {
    $chars[] = array_fill(0, 10, 'a');
}

// test array_merge
$new = [];
$start = microtime(TRUE);
foreach ($chars as $splitArray) {
    $new = array_merge($new, $splitArray);
}
echo microtime(true) - $start; // => 14.61776 sec

// test foreach
$new = [];
$start = microtime(TRUE);
foreach ($chars as $splitArray) {
    foreach ($splitArray as $value) {
        $new[] = $value;
    }
}
echo microtime(true) - $start; // => 0.00900101 sec
// ==> 1600 times faster
1
  • This answer does not bring any new information to the page. Performance comparisons were posted years prior. Jan 21, 2019 at 16:08

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