There are no similar concept of (Java) Collection in C++.

I can understand the reason, but I want to know whether there is any way to fake it elegantly.

Example

I have implemented many custom Collections.
They all have Iterator that works correctly, similar to std::vector, std::unordered_set, etc.

They are MyArray<T> , MyBinaryTree<T> and MySet<T>.

Here I will show a working code that show the location I want to fake it.

Let's say that I have 2 levels of program : library and user.
It does only one thing - User commands Library to eat all Orange*s in a bucket.

Library.h

class Library{
    public: static void eatAll(const MyArray<Orange*>& bucket);
};

Library.cpp

#include "Orange.h"
void Library::eatAll(const MyArray<Orange*>& bucket){
    for(auto orange:bucket){
        orange->eaten();
    }
}

User.h

MyArray<Orange*> bucket;
Library::eatAll(bucket);    

It is OK.

Now, I want Library::eatAll to also support MyBinaryTree<Orange*>, I have some not-so-desirable approaches as below.

My poor solution

1. Java way

  • Make MyBinaryTree<T> and MyArray<Orange*> (and their iterator) inherit from a new class Collection<T> (and CollectionIterator<T>).
  • change signature to Library::eatAll(const Collection<T>&)

Disadvantage : performance penalty from "virtual" of some functions in Collection<T>.

2. Template v1

//Library.h
template<class T> void eatAll(const T&t ){
    for(auto orange : t){
        orange->eaten();
    }
}
  • make eatAll a template function

Disadvantage : The implementation of the eatAll must be in header.
I have to #include orange.h in Library.h.
Sometimes, I really want to just forward declaration.

3. Template v2

//Library.h
template<class T> void eatAll(const T&t ){
    for(auto orange : t){
        eatAnOrange(orange)
    }
}
private: void eatAnOrange(Orange* orange){
    //below implementation is inside Library.cpp
    orange->eaten();
}
  • create a middle-man function eatAnOrange

Disadvantage :

  • Code is less readable, not concise, cause a little maintainability problem.
  • If there are a lot of other functions e.g. squeezeAll(), I probably have to create a lot of middle-man functions, e.g. squeezeAnOrange().

4. Operator=()

Create converter among the 3 collection classes via implicit constructor.
Disadvantage : Suffer performance from creating a new instance of collection.

//Here is what it will do, internally (roughly speaking)
MyBinaryTree<Orange*> bucket;
Library::eatAll(MyArray<Orange*>(bucket)); 

I believe my solutions are inelegant.
Are there any solutions that don't suffer the mentioned disadvantage?

Edit:
Both of current answers are elegant than my approaches (thank!), but still has disadvantage :-
- Oliv's requires #include "orange.h" in User.h.
- Richard Hodges's has virtual function calling.

  • You can probably type erase the collection and have a non template function that accepts the common base class, but this will introduce virtual calls all around (that is what Java has, being the base class an interface). Otherwise make your function a function template where T is the container, not the contained type. – skypjack Mar 9 '17 at 7:36
  • @skypjack Thank for an alternative solution though, skypack! ... T is the container = my "Template way 1"? – javaLover Mar 9 '17 at 7:38
  • 1
    The Container Concept comes closest to what you are thinking. – R Sahu Mar 9 '17 at 7:40
  • @R Sahu Thank, the new "Concept" covers such a really very wide area! Do you use Concept (the C++ experimental feature) in practice, i.e. adopt it personally, already? – javaLover Mar 9 '17 at 7:54
  • 1
    The model you should have in mind is that, while java is big on run time polymorphism (as implemented through virtual functions), C++ is big on compile time polymorphism (as implemented through templates). – Hurkyl Mar 9 '17 at 10:27

In C++, collections are traversed using the iterator design pattern. The entire STL is designed around this concept. It may fit your needs:

You could define eatAll as a function that accept two iterators:

template<class Iterator,class Sentinel>
void eatAll(Iterator it, Sentinel s){
    for (;it!=s;++it)
      it->eaten();
}

Or the range like algorithm interface:

template<class Range>
void eatAll(Range& r){
    for (auto& v:r)
      v.eaten();
}

You will have to define you binary tree as a range (it must implement begin() and end()). Hopefully trees are kind of graph that can be linearised. All the smart work will then go in the iterator implementation!

  • Both orange type and collection type are hidden in template/auto ... nice trick .... I will taste it. Thank! The only disadvantage is IDE will be dizzy, so context clue (ctrl+space inside the function) will not work for orange. – javaLover Mar 9 '17 at 8:29
  • @javaLover This design pattern is really everywhere in the STL, and most of the C++ programs I have read. You can be confident in it. – Oliv Mar 9 '17 at 8:36
  • Oh, I just found another disadvantage. .... Now,User.h will have to #include "orange.h", if I don't include it in Library.h. .... correct? .... This is a little hard to manage + slower compile time. ... Yes, your solution is still better than my Template v1/v2 approach. – javaLover Mar 9 '17 at 8:59
  • 1
    1. This is the problem with template-meta programming. Compilers are really fast nowadays (at least if you compile in parallel make -j8), you should not worry about this question from the antic days... (before 2010). 2. I would be really be proud if it were my solution, but this solution has been invented before I born! It is used intensively in C++ by millions of programmers and architects since tens and tens of years, its benefits are proven by experiment! you should adopt it. – Oliv Mar 9 '17 at 9:17

If you want it truly polymorphic, then we have to deal with 2 things:

  1. the actual type of the container

  2. The fact that the result of dereferencing a map is a pair containing key and value references.

My view is that the answer to this is not to derive from containers, which is limiting, but to create a polymorphic "value iterator", which models all iterators and extracts their values correctly.

Then we can write code like this:

int main()
{

    std::vector<Orange> vo {
            Orange(), Orange()
    };

    std::map<int, Orange> mio {
            { 1, Orange() },
            { 2, Orange() },
            { 3, Orange() }
    };

    std::cout << "vector:\n";
    auto first = makePolymorphicValueIterator(vo.begin());
    auto last = makePolymorphicValueIterator(vo.end());
    do_orange_things(first, last);

    std::cout << "\nmap:\n";
    first = makePolymorphicValueIterator(mio.begin());
    last = makePolymorphicValueIterator(mio.end());
    do_orange_things(first, last);
}

To get this:

vector:
Orange
Orange

map:
Orange
Orange
Orange

Here's a minimal, complete implementation:

#include <typeinfo>
#include <memory>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <map>
#include <iterator>

// define an orange
struct Orange {
};

// a meta-function to get the type of the value of some iterated value_type    
template<class ValueType> struct type_of_value
{
    using type = ValueType;
};

// specialise it for maps and unordered maps
template<class K, class V> struct type_of_value<std::pair<K, V>>
{
    using type = V;
};

template<class ValueType> using type_of_value_t = typename type_of_value<ValueType>::type;

// function to extract a value from an instance of a value_type    
template<class ValueType> struct value_extractor
{
    template<class V>
    auto& operator()(V&& v) const {
        return v;
    }
};

// specialised for maps    
template<class K, class V> struct value_extractor<std::pair<K, V>>
{
    template<class Arg>
    auto& operator()(Arg&& v) const {
        return std::get<1>(v);
    }
};

template<class Iter>
auto extract_value(Iter const& iter) ->  auto&
{
    using value_type = typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::value_type;
    auto e = value_extractor<value_type> {};
    return e(*iter);
}

// a polymorphic (forward only at the moment) iterator
// which delivers the value (in the case of maps) or the element (every other container)
template<class ValueType>
struct PolymorphicValueIterator {

    using value_type = type_of_value_t<ValueType>;

private:
    struct iterator_details {
        std::type_info const &type;
        void *address;
    };

    struct concept {

        virtual std::unique_ptr<concept> clone() const = 0;

        virtual value_type& invoke_deref() const = 0;

        virtual void invoke_next(std::size_t distance = 1) = 0;

        virtual iterator_details get_details() = 0;

        virtual bool is_equal(const iterator_details &other) const = 0;

        virtual ~concept() = default;

    };

    template<class Iter>
    struct model final : concept {

        model(Iter iter)
                : iter_(iter)
        {}

        std::unique_ptr<concept> clone() const override
        {
            return std::make_unique<model>(iter_);
        }


        virtual value_type& invoke_deref() const override {
            return extract_value(iter_);
        }

        void invoke_next(std::size_t distance = 1) override
        {
            iter_ = std::next(iter_, distance);
        }

        iterator_details get_details() override {
            return {
                    typeid(Iter),
                    std::addressof(iter_)
            };
        }

        bool is_equal(const iterator_details &other) const override {
            if (typeid(Iter) != other.type) {
                return false;
            }
            auto pother = reinterpret_cast<Iter const*>(other.address);
            Iter const& iother = *pother;
            return iter_ == iother;
        }

        Iter iter_;
    };


    std::unique_ptr<concept> concept_ptr_;

public:
    bool operator==(PolymorphicValueIterator const &r) const {
        return concept_ptr_->is_equal(r.concept_ptr_->get_details());
    }

    bool operator!=(PolymorphicValueIterator const &r) const {
        return not concept_ptr_->is_equal(r.concept_ptr_->get_details());
    }

    PolymorphicValueIterator &operator++() {
        concept_ptr_->invoke_next(1);
        return *this;
    }

    value_type& operator*() const {
        return concept_ptr_->invoke_deref();
    }

    template<class Iter>
    PolymorphicValueIterator(Iter iter)
    {
        concept_ptr_ = std::make_unique<model<Iter>>(iter);
    }

    PolymorphicValueIterator(PolymorphicValueIterator const& r)
            : concept_ptr_(r.concept_ptr_->clone())
    {}

    PolymorphicValueIterator& operator=(PolymorphicValueIterator const& r)
    {
        concept_ptr_ = r.concept_ptr_->clone();
        return *this;
    }

};

template<class Iter>
auto makePolymorphicValueIterator(Iter iter)
{
    using iter_value_type = typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::value_type;
    using value_type = type_of_value_t<iter_value_type>;
    return PolymorphicValueIterator<value_type>(iter);
}

// a test
void do_orange_things(PolymorphicValueIterator<Orange> first, PolymorphicValueIterator<Orange> last)
{
    while(first != last) {
        std::cout << "Orange\n";
        ++first;
    }
}

int main()
{

    std::vector<Orange> vo {
            Orange(), Orange()
    };

    std::map<int, Orange> mio {
            { 1, Orange() },
            { 2, Orange() },
            { 3, Orange() }
    };

    std::cout << "vector:\n";
    auto first = makePolymorphicValueIterator(vo.begin());
    auto last = makePolymorphicValueIterator(vo.end());
    do_orange_things(first, last);

    std::cout << "\nmap:\n";
    first = makePolymorphicValueIterator(mio.begin());
    last = makePolymorphicValueIterator(mio.end());
    do_orange_things(first, last);
}
  • In this approach, I will suffer "virtual"-cost same as my first approach (Java way), right? .... (Thank for taking time to write to full code.) – javaLover Mar 9 '17 at 8:42
  • @javaLover anything polymorphic will suffer (the often imaginary) "virtual cost". The other answer offers the generic programming solution which in most cases will be more efficient, but does not offer polymorphism. pay your money, take your choice... :) – Richard Hodges Mar 9 '17 at 8:46
  • 1
    @javaLover whichever approach you take, note that both answers suggest (strongly) that there is no need to derive a general "container". If you wanted to do this, then I would suggest a "container-view" which stores a reference to the container. You'd still have virtual calls on your iterators whichever way you did it. This would only matter if you were iterating millions of times in a tight loop with very little logic per iteration. – Richard Hodges Mar 9 '17 at 8:49
  • 1
    @javaLover Template meta-programming and polymorphism are like the two sides of a same coin. Using meta-programming you will get the fastest program while their are not two many different instantiations of the same template. But at some points you get the so-called code bloat. At this point, type-erasures techniques like the one proposed in this answer become useful. – Oliv Mar 9 '17 at 9:07
  • 2
    @javaLover If you are interested in ontology of C++ techniques, PolymorphicValueIterator implement the technique called "value type polymorphism" which is a kind of "type-erasure". – Oliv Mar 9 '17 at 9:37

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