0
def main():
    x = [randint(1,100) for i in range(1,100)]
    return x

This returns 100 random numbers btw 1 and 100. Each time I call the function, it returns a different sequence of numbers. What I want to, is to get the same sequence of numbers each time. maybe saving the results into sth?

  • you could use pickle or just generate once and hardcode it in your program. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 9 '17 at 7:37
  • you have to be more specific, there are a lot of ways to do that. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 9 '17 at 7:39
  • 1
    I don't think pickle is directly related and generate once is not what is being asked. – pvg Mar 9 '17 at 7:40
  • FWIW, you normally only call main() once each time you run a program. Do you want to get the same sequence of numbers each time the program is run? – PM 2Ring Mar 9 '17 at 7:51
  • 1
    You appear to be using the random module. The documentation tells you how to initialise it using the seed function. – Peter Wood Mar 9 '17 at 7:57
8

You can provide some fixed seed.

import random

def main():
    random.seed(9001)
    x = [random.randint(1,100) for i in range(1,100)]
    return x

For more information on seed: random.seed(): What does it do?

  • That is incorrect. It doesn't provide the same results since it is a list of such random numbers. – shad0w_wa1k3r Mar 9 '17 at 7:37
  • @AshishNitinPatil can you be more specific? – Jean-François Fabre Mar 9 '17 at 7:38
  • You can do more than that. At any particular point you can retrieve the rng state withrandom.getstate() and then reset it with random.setstate() – pvg Mar 9 '17 at 7:39
  • You should put the random.seed(9001) in the function itself. Putting it outside of it doesn't solve OP's problem. – shad0w_wa1k3r Mar 9 '17 at 7:40
  • 1
    @AshishNitinPatil Fair point. OTOH, main() is normally only called once per program invocation, as the entrypoint to the program. But of course the OP may not be adhering to that convention. – PM 2Ring Mar 9 '17 at 7:44
6

Here's a basic example patterned after your code

import random
s = random.getstate()

print([random.randint(1,100) for i in range(10)])

random.setstate(s)
print([random.randint(1,100) for i in range(10)])

In both invocations, you get identical output. The key is, at any point you can retrieve and later reassign the current state of the rng.

  • Okay, but..how do you incorporate getstate() and setstate() into a program? Please write in easy English – theo bogner Mar 9 '17 at 18:29
  • Sure, you just have to explain in a little more detail what you mean by 'incorporate in a program' and what the behaviour your are looking for is. – pvg Mar 9 '17 at 18:34
  • It is safe to set state to original value after altering it. You can get into trouble if you use randint from other places in your application. Another way could be to use random.Random class instance and set seed on it – Murali KG Jan 25 at 11:56
2
In [19]: for i in range(10):
    ...:     random.seed(10)
    ...:     print [random.randint(1, 100) for j in range(5)]
    ...:
    ...:
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]
[58, 43, 58, 21, 82]

The random.seed function has to be called just before a fresh call to random.

In [20]: random.seed(10)

In [21]: for i in range(10):
    ...:     print [random.randint(1,10) for j in range(10)]
    ...:
[5, 6, 3, 9, 9, 7, 2, 6, 4, 3]
[10, 10, 1, 9, 7, 4, 3, 7, 5, 7]
[7, 2, 8, 10, 10, 7, 1, 1, 2, 10]
[4, 4, 9, 4, 6, 5, 1, 6, 9, 2]
[3, 5, 1, 5, 9, 7, 6, 9, 2, 6]
[4, 7, 2, 8, 1, 2, 9, 10, 5, 5]
[3, 3, 7, 2, 2, 5, 2, 7, 9, 8]
[5, 4, 5, 1, 8, 4, 4, 1, 5, 6]
[4, 9, 7, 3, 6, 10, 6, 7, 1, 5]
[5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 5, 2, 5, 10, 5]

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