5

In The C++ Programming Language, Fourth Edition - chapter 23.4.7 Friends, I found following example (I have slightly modified it to show only relevant part):

template<typename T>
class Vector {
public:
    friend Vector operator*<>(const Vector& v, int f); 
                           ^^ ~~~~ ?
};

template<typename T>
Vector<T> operator*(const Vector<T>& v, int f) {
    return v;
}

I tried to compile it, but I get following error (clang):

main.cpp:8:20: error: friends can only be classes or functions
        friend Vector operator*<>(const Vector& v, int f); 
                      ^
main.cpp:8:29: error: expected ';' at end of declaration list
        friend Vector operator*<>(const Vector& v, int f); 
                               ^
                               ;
2 errors generated.

Book explains that :

The <> after the name of the friend function is needed to make clear that the friend is a template function. Without the <>, a non template function would be assumed.

And that is all on this.

Without <> this code compiles, but when operator* is used (ex.: Vector<int> v; v*12;) then linker error appears:

main.cpp:(.text+0xb): undefined reference to `operator*(Vector<int> const&, int)'

So I assume that <> is needed to tell compiler that function template for operator* should be generated each time Vector template is instantiated for given type.

But what am I doing wrong in the example from the book, and why?

9

As the book said,

the <> after the name of the friend function is needed to make clear that the friend is a template function.

That means, the name should refer to a function template, which should be declared (as template) in advance. e.g.

// forward declaration of the class template
template<typename T>
class Vector;

// declaration of the function template
template<typename T>
Vector<T> operator*(const Vector<T>& v, int f);

template<typename T>
class Vector {
public:
    // friend declaration
    friend Vector operator*<>(const Vector& v, int f); 
};

// definition of the function template
template<typename T>
Vector<T> operator*(const Vector<T>& v, int f) {
    return v;
}
2
  • why we need forward declaration of class template ? – Undefined Behaviour Mar 16 '17 at 7:54
  • 1
    @Spartacus Because its name is used in the declaration of the function template. – songyuanyao Mar 16 '17 at 10:44
4

In your case, you're declaring operator* as a friend directly inside Vector, without any previous declaration. Therefore the correct syntax is:

template<typename T>
class Vector {
public:
    template<typename>
    friend Vector operator*(const Vector& v, int f);               
};

template<typename T>
Vector<T> operator*(const Vector<T>& v, int f) {
    return v;
}

live example on wandbox

4
  • Is there any difference between those two methods? In songyuanyao answer, I learnt that I must declare template operator* before the class, from your answer I can declare it after the class. Is that the only difference in behaviour? – mike Mar 9 '17 at 10:03
  • 2
    @mike For this case, two things are done at the same time; (1) declare the template function, (2) make it the friend. The behavior is the same as the non-template friend function declarations. – songyuanyao Mar 9 '17 at 10:06
  • ok, so <> is only to let the compiler know that operator* was already declared and it is a template - right? – mike Mar 9 '17 at 10:10
  • 2
    @mike Yes. More precisely, <> is only telling the compiler that this is a template. Because it's not a template declaration itself (as the case in romeo's answer), the compiler need to find the declaration of the template. That's why it has to be declared in advance; otherwise the compiler would complain. – songyuanyao Mar 9 '17 at 10:12
2

To make template friend method syntax work you need a forward declaration of this template method.

template<typename T>
class Vector;

template<typename T>
Vector<T> operator*(const Vector<T>& v, int f);

template<typename T>
class Vector
{
    template<typename T_> friend
    Vector<T_> operator*(const Vector<T_>& v, int f);
};

template<typename T>
Vector<T> operator*(const Vector<T>& v, int f)
{
    return v;
}
2
  • Thanks, I see this is the same as in Vittorio Romeo answer. But those declarations of class Vector and operato* are not needed. And also typename before Vector causes compile errors. – mike Mar 9 '17 at 10:18
  • No, this is not exactly the same as Vittorio Romeo answer. In general case one can not get away with <> and need all these forward declarations. For example if you had another template method that is a bit more complex: template<typename T, int whatever> Vector<T> operator*(const Vector<T>& v, int f); – dodo951 Mar 9 '17 at 10:36
0

Whatever book you're using is explaining it incorrectly.

What you need to do is

template<typename T>
class Vector
{
       public:
           friend Vector<T> operator*(const Vector<T>& v, int f); 
};

template<typename T>
   Vector<T> operator*(const Vector<T>& v, int f)
{
    return v;
}

The above makes the operator*() which accepts a Vector<T> a friend of Vector<T> but not a friend of Vector<U> (unless T is the same type as U).

Within the class definition it is possible to leave out the <T> from Vector<T>, but in my experience mere human beings seem to have more trouble convincing themselves that the function declaration and function definition correspond to each other. So I generally prefer not doing that .... your call though.

The <> syntax is used when explicitly specialising templates, but that's not what you are trying to do. For example, with a templated function;

 template <class T> void foo(T) { /* whatever */   }
 template<> void foo<int> {/* something specific to int */ }
2
  • your solution causes linker error, you need to use a different class (instead of T) for friend declaration – Raxvan Mar 9 '17 at 10:10
  • actually this syntax with <> is correct, the only thing that confused me was that Stroustrup has not added declaration of operator* before the Vector class. Maybe He wanted to make the book shorter. – mike Mar 9 '17 at 10:12
0

Using <> is what C++ FAQ suggests, too.

But you can solve it by simply using the templated declaration like you would normally, except the parameters must be named differently from the class parameters. Then in the separate definition you can again use any type names:

template <typename T>
class Vector {
 public:
  T i{};
  // Typename must be different from the class typename(s).
  template <typename T_1>
  friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const Vector<T_1>& v);
};

// Typename can be any.
template <typename T>
ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const Vector<T>& v) {
  return os << v.i;
}

Live demo

That's all. No need for weird <> in-between function declaration, or pre-declarations.

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