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I have a LINQ query and I want to have addresses between a range of zipcodes from 1000 to 2000.

How do I find if the zipcode with a value "3456 AB" (I only check the 4 first characters) exists of only digits?

var address = address.Where(p => p.Zipcode != null
                              && p.Zipcode.Length > 4 
                              && p.Zipcode.Substring(0, 4).Isnumber() 
                              && Convert.ToInt32(p.Zipcode.Substring(0, 4)) > zipcodeFrom);
  • Is that in memory, on SQL Server or on some other database? – Marco Mar 9 '17 at 11:07
  • Can you give a simple example of expected input and output? Your question is not clear. – TVOHM Mar 9 '17 at 11:10
  • 1
    Does what you have not work? Or what is the question? – HimBromBeere Mar 9 '17 at 11:11
  • An exception as: "SECR" is not a number... – user1531040 Mar 9 '17 at 11:30
2

You may use Regex to check if the first four chars represent a number from 1000 to 2000. This would simplify your expression significantly:

var address = address.Where(p => p.Zipcode != null
    && Regex.Match(p.Zipcode, @"^[12]\d{3}").Success);
| improve this answer | |
  • Regex is great and indispensible, but in such an easy case it's unnecessary to make the algorithm take the performance impact it implies. – Robert Synoradzki Apr 12 '17 at 12:08
2

You should just use TryParse, it returns bool if the string is convertable to an int.

Some dummy data to test on:

var addresses = new[]
{
    new { Zipcode = "3456 AB" }, // These of course have other fields,
    new { Zipcode = "345678"  }, // but in this example we only care
    new { Zipcode = "876543"  }, // about Zipcode
    new { Zipcode = "X3456"   },
    new { Zipcode = "5000 GG" },
};

The query:

    int zipcodeFrom = 4000;
    int parsedZipcode;

    var qualifiedAddresses = addresses
        .Where(p => true
            && p.Zipcode != null
            && p.Zipcode.Length >= 4
            && int.TryParse(p.Zipcode.Substring(0, 4), out parsedZipcode)
            && parsedZipcode > zipcodeFrom
        );

Output:

876543 
5000 GG 
| improve this answer | |
  • Why aren't you reusing dummy? You don't need to Convert.ToInt32 – xanatos Mar 9 '17 at 11:13
  • Quite pretty the use of true && :-) I like it. Note that I would use uint because otherwise -999 ABCD would be valid. – xanatos Mar 9 '17 at 11:14
  • @xanatos - true that, I was doing twice the parsing. The variable is longer a "dummy", right? ;) – Robert Synoradzki Mar 9 '17 at 11:16
  • That's for conditions readability - now you can comment any of them because each has it's own line, they are aligned (even the first condition, because now the first condition is true, which doesn't change the result), plus when you comment all of them, it's still valid because of that true. If you want to align logical ORs, you use false. – Robert Synoradzki Mar 10 '17 at 10:48
1

For example:

var valid = adress.Where(x => x.ZipCode != null)
    .Select(x => x.ZipCode)
    .Where(x => x.Take(4).All(Char.IsDigit));

The Where-clause checks the four first characters of every ZipCode to be all numbers. Be aware that when using Take(4) you will get an enumeration of type char, not just a string. Thus you can simply call x.IsDigit to check if the character represents a number.

| improve this answer | |
  • I think question asks about how to take zipcodes between 1000 and 2000, not take first 4 record – kgzdev Mar 9 '17 at 11:08
1
var valid = addresses
    .Where(a => 
        a.Zipcode != null 
        && a.Zipcode.Length > 4 
        && a.Zipcode.Substring(0, 4).All(char.IsDigit))
    .Select(a => new { Address = a, Zipcode = Convert.ToInt32(a.Zipcode.Substring(0, 4)) })
    .Where(a => a.Zipcode >= 1000 && a.Zipcode <= 2000)
    .Select(a => a.Address);

Keeping your original checks in - firstly we filter out all addresses where Zipcode is null, is less than 4 in length, or the first 4 characters are not all digits.

The we project a new sequence of an anonymous type containing the address and the 4 digit Zipcode as an int. We can then filter this collection by checking if the int Zipcode is within the range we require. Finally we return the original addresses.

| improve this answer | |
1

You can match a 4 digits string and parse it.

var resultString = int.Parse(
    Regex.Match(zip, @"\d{4}").Value
    );

If you want the Linq equivalent

var linqEquiv = zip.Select((c, i) =>
  String.Join("",zip.Skip(i).Take(4))).FirstOrDefault(zip => 
    { int i; return int.TryParse(zip, out i) && i >= 1000 && i <= 2000 ; });

Finally, with your class definition

var linqEquivalent = address.Where(a => a.ZipCode.ToArray().Select((c, i) =>
    String.Join("", a.ZipCode.ToArray().Skip(i).Take(4))).FirstOrDefault(zip =>
        { int i; return int.TryParse(zip, out i) && i >= 1000 && i <= 2000; }) != null);

test case

with the following list

var address = new List<Address>() {
    new Address() { ZipCode = "123 cap 1567 AB 6666" }, // 1567 matches conds
    new Address() { ZipCode = "123 cap 4567 AB 6666" },
    new Address() { ZipCode = "123 cap 4567 AB 1666" } }; // 1666 matches conds

linqEquivalent will contain the first and the third address.

| improve this answer | |
  • LINQ does not support Regex.Match (& int.Parse too). – user1531040 Mar 9 '17 at 11:17
  • Added the Linq equivalent to my answer – user6996876 Mar 9 '17 at 11:21
  • I've revised my answer, assuming that address is a list of class with a ZipCode member... – user6996876 Mar 9 '17 at 12:03
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int intzipcode;

var address = address
    .Where(p => true
        && p.Zipcode != null
        && p.Zipcode.Length > 4
        && int.TryParse(p.Zipcode.Substring(0, 4), out intzipcode)
        && Convert.ToInt32(p.Zipcode.Substring(0, 4)) > 1000
        && Convert.ToInt32(p.Zipcode.Substring(0, 4)) < 2000
    )
| improve this answer | |
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Thank you for all your answers. I have tried it all.

Maybe it's LINQ-to-SQL. But all functions as All, char.IsDigit and Regex.Match doesn't work. The "table" from SQL Server was a view. So I changed the view for an extra field ZipcodeInt.

var address = address.Where(p => p.Zipcode != null
                                && p.Zipcode.Length > 4 
                                && p.ZipcodeInt > zipcodeFrom);
| improve this answer | |

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