10

I understand that I must unsubscribe certains Observable (ie: Observables that have infinite value) when Components are destroyed in order to prevent memory leaks. I do not need to do that for finite Observables as they will complete and automatically unsubscribe.

But if I create an infinite Observable in my component (for example FormGroup.valueChanges, or QueryList.changes), this one will be destroyed with the component that contains it, so I think that they will be no memory leak even if I do not unsubscribe from it.

Here is a simple example:

@Component({})
export class DummyComponent {
    form: FormGroup;

    constructor(private fb: FormBuilder) {
        this.form = this.fb.group({
            firstName: [''],
            lastName: ['']
        });
        this.form.valueChanges.subscribe(
            x => console.log(x)
        );
    }
}

Here, I do not unsubscribe from this.form.valueChanges; when my component is destroyed, the this.form.valueChanges will be destroyed too.

Will there be a memory leak in this case?

  • 3
    Have you tried to add an complete callback to subscribe(...) and checked if it gets called when the component is destroyed? – Günter Zöchbauer Mar 9 '17 at 11:36
  • I did, and it is not called (I only did the test with this.form.valueChanges). – freedonaab Mar 9 '17 at 11:46
  • I guess then it's better but not necessary to unsubscribe. I wouldn't expect a memory leak because the when the component is destroyed, it will get garbage collected, and your subscription with it. If you subscribe or pass the subscription outside of the component (for example a service) then this might prevent the component from being GCed, but if all is within the component it shouldn't hurt. – Günter Zöchbauer Mar 9 '17 at 13:15
8

As Babar had mention, you need to do the unsubscribe in order to stop those subscriptions to continue watching for changes.

For your particular case I think that you have a point.

One thing I do when I have a lot of subscriptions in the same component is the following.

First I create "subscriptions", an empty Array of Subscription type.

private subscriptions: Subscription[] = [];

Then every time I need to do subscribe I push it into the array

this.subscriptions.push(this.form.valueChanges.subscribe(x => console.log(x)));

And in the ngOnDestroy I unsubscribe to every subscription inside the array.

ngOnDestroy(): void {
  this.subscriptions.forEach((elem) => { elem.unsubscribe(); })
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    You can add subscriptions to each other with the subscription.add() method. Then you only need to unsubscribe the top subscription. – DarkNeuron Aug 7 '17 at 16:33
3

When your component is destroyed your subscribers are not they still waiting for any event came to them it will cost memory as well sometimes it may disturb your logics as well. for example router events subscription it will trigger everywhere in your app and execute the code you did inside subscription.

I second case if you switch between components and never unsubscribed your app will be hang up after a bunch of time because whenever you load the component new subscribers bind up.

@Component({})
export class DummyComponent implements OnDestroy {
 form: FormGroup;
 subscription: Subscription; // from rxjs
 constructor(private fb: FormBuilder) {
    this.form = this.fb.group({
        firstName: [''],
        lastName: ['']
    });
    this.subscription = this.form.valueChanges.subscribe(
        x => console.log(x)
    );
 }

 ngOnDestroy(): void {
  this.subscription.unsubscribe();
 }
}
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