7

I wanted to try out the clang static analyzer. I'm on Windows and built clang with Visual Studio. It seems to work, but at the same time it seems to be extremely useless.

I made an example file

example.c

int main(void) 
{
    int h = 0;
    return 1/h;
}

Calling scan-build gcc -c example.c finds no error.

example.c

int main(void) 
{
    int h;
    return 1/h;
}

Calling scan-build gcc -c example.c finds no error.

example.c

int main(void) 
{
    return 1/0;
}

Calling scan-build gcc -c example.c finds no error.

If these most basic errors can't be found (and they can be found by clang itself), how can the static analyzer be of any use?

My gcc is MinGW if that matters. I also tried substituting clang but there's just nothing happening.

Am I doing something wrong here?

  • 1
    I haven't used this particular static analyser, but many others. As a rule of thumb, always assume they are broken beyond repair. – Lundin Mar 9 '17 at 13:42
  • 7
    @Lundin Yeah, and never consider that you might be using it wrong or for the wrong thing, that would be ridiculous. – nwp Mar 9 '17 at 13:43
  • 1
    My theory is that there are errors that are easy and fast to find, so clang just finds them for you. And then there are errors that are difficult to find and require costly analysis that massively increase your compile times which therefore cannot be enabled in clang, so they are moved into the dedicated static analyzer. That static analyzer doesn't repeat what clang is already doing, that would just be wasted effort. The test cases you have are simple and therefore nothing the static analyzer even considers. Use the tools in combination instead of expecting one tool to find everything. – nwp Mar 9 '17 at 14:22
  • 3
    Cannot reproduce. These examples work fine for me, using both clang-3.6 (from a debian package) and a fairly recent svn of clang-5.0. (Of course, I'm not trying on Windows.) – rici Mar 9 '17 at 16:02
  • 4
    By the way, you can specify the -v option (immediately after the scan-build command) up to three times, to receive increasingly amounts of debugging output, which might help you understand why it is not managing to do a static analysis on your system. – rici Mar 9 '17 at 17:21
2

be sure to use build-scan -v (verbose) to see if actually running clang checker. I followed this tutorial http://web.cs.ucla.edu/~tianyi.zhang/tutorial.html When I tried the C++ example it did not show any errors in the buggy code. The -v showed me that the provided Makefile was broken - after I fixed that clang still did not detect the bugs but g++ shows the bug.

Maybe they turned that particular check off. Clang Static Analyzer version 3.8 The tutorial uses version 3.2

  • I uninstalled Clang since I couldn't make it work, but I'll try to do this should I try again. – CodeMonkey Jul 3 '17 at 6:10
0

Maybe you are not doing something right. For example, the third example Visual Studio 2015 even refused to compile with error:

error C2124: divide or mod by zero.

I don't think Clang is not capable of detect something like that. However, this is not important.

I tried to check this code using PVS-Studio and it detected all three errors:

  • V609 Divide by zero. Denominator 'h' == 0. MFCApplication2 mainfrm.cpp 17
  • V614 Uninitialized variable 'h' used. MFCApplication2 mainfrm.cpp 23
  • V609 Divide by zero. Denominator '0' == 0. MFCApplication2 mainfrm.cpp 28

Therefore, I recommend you still experiment. At least the third case should be exactly found by Clang. A practical recommendation is to use more powerful tools, such as PVS-Studio, for analysis. He, by the way, finds errors in Clang and GCC.

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