Working on designing in the browser with CSS I'm aware when you code a block of text the font-size set on a <span> tag is a relative unit based on the <p> tag.

Research

From my searches I was able to produce a similar recent question from "Nested <span> inside a <p> tag giving different font size" that references CSS-Tricks:

"The em unit is a relative unit based on the computed value of the font size of the parent element. This means that child elements are always dependent on their parent to set their font-size."

But I was unable to produce a result to my question after searching:

Another similar question I found but doesn't answer what I'm looking for:

The Question

If you have HTML:

<p class="foo"><span class="bar">This month is March.</span></p>

With CSS:

.foo {
    font-family:"Proxima Nova Rg", sans-serif;
    font-size:0.833em;
    font-style:normal;
    font-variant:normal;
    font-weight:normal;
}
.bar {
    font-family:"Proxima Nova Rg", sans-serif;
    font-size:0.8em;
    font-style:normal;
    font-variant:normal;
    font-weight:normal;
}

What is the actual font-size height of the text This month is March. with the applied CSS font-size set on the <p> and <span>?

I ask because I'm curious to know the equation if I wanted the same height without having the <span> tag? Is there a formula to determine the final font-size when a <p> and <span> tag that both have a height applied?

  • If you want to avoid making weird calculations, you could always use REM. I know this isn't an answer to your problem / question, but it sure is worth looking at caniuse and Mozilla Developer Network – Douwe de Haan Mar 9 '17 at 15:36
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because em is a percentage information, you can calculate the final em by multiplying the individual font sizes.

0.833em * 0.8em = 0.6664em

Wether this will work in an accurate way in the browser or not depends on how the browser handles the fonts sizes internally. If the browser uses an intermediate size representation in px for the elements where the em depends on, then you might get slightly different results if there are rounding errors.

.foo {
    font-family:"Proxima Nova Rg", sans-serif;
    font-size:0.833em;
    font-style:normal;
    font-variant:normal;
    font-weight:normal;
}
.bar {
    font-family:"Proxima Nova Rg", sans-serif;
    font-size:0.8em;
    font-style:normal;
    font-variant:normal;
    font-weight:normal;
}

.bar2 {
    font-family:"Proxima Nova Rg", sans-serif;
    font-size:0.6664em;
    font-style:normal;
    font-variant:normal;
    font-weight:normal;
}
<p class="foo"><span class="bar">This month is March.</span></p>
<span class="bar2">This month is March.</span>

An em is a percentage relevant to the parent object. Which means any text using an em value will be a percentage of the parent's text size.

In your case, the font-size of the <p> will be 83.3% of it's parent. The <span> font size will be 80% of that, or 66.64%.

Since you didn't specify a parent font-size, the browser will default to 16px, set on the html element. So your final pixel value will be:

16 * 0.833 * 0.8 = 10.6624

Which will be rounded to 11px.

Of course, it's better to set a font-size yourself on the <body> tag, just to be sure. The upside of this behavior is that it's much easier to create fluid lay-outs. You just need to increase or decrease the font-size on the body for different screen sizes.

What is the actual font-size height of the text This month is March.

The font size of the span is 0.8em, so it is 0.8 * X where X is the font size of the paragraph.

The paragraph is also 0.8em, so it is 0.8 * Y where Y is the font size of the paragraph's parent element. There is no information as to what that font size is in the question.

This makes the font size of the span 0.8 * 0.8 * Y or 0.64 * Y

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