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I'm having a hard time figuring out how to access the parent's class scope. My code is as follows

var Class = function(){
    this.smth = 3;
}

Class.prototype.setters = {};
Class.prototype.setters.smth = function(smth){
    this.smth = smth;
}

However this of course does not work, it affects smth to Class.setters. I tried using .bind(Class.prototype); to no avail. Does anyone have a solution? I've got plenty of sub-methods.

  • 1
    If I understood you well, you want to create a method to set smth, in this case Class.prototype.setSmth = function (smth) { this.smth = smth; };. Is this what you want? – smarber Mar 9 '17 at 16:18
  • @smarber no sorry, maybe i did not explain well. That's just the example. I want to create sub-methods capable of accessing 'this' from the parent class. – Jo Colina Mar 9 '17 at 16:20
  • There is "scope" in objects? – Bergi Mar 9 '17 at 16:36
  • @JoColina Just do not use "sub-methods". Use proper own methods. – Bergi Mar 9 '17 at 16:37
2

When you call someInstance.setters.smth(...) the this of the function call is the settings object, and there's no way for that smth function to know how the settings object is being accessed, only that it is being provided as a this.

You could keep your desired syntax but at significant memory cost by creating a unique setters object for each instance, inside your constructor:

var Class = function(){
    var thisClassInstance = this;
    this.smth = 3;
    this.setters = {};
    this.setters.smth = function(smth){
        thisClassInstance.smth = smth;
    }
}

This is suboptimal because you lose the benefits of prototype inheritance; each instance has a suite of unique functions in the setters object and nothing is shared.

A leaner way would be to have each instance has its own setters object that knows the identity of its parent instance, but that setters object inherits all its methods from a prototype setter object:

// all `setters` object inherit their methods from this object
var settersPrototype = {};

// methods on the `setters` set values on `this.parent`
settersPrototype.smth = function(smth){
    this.parent.smth = smth;
}

var Class = function(){
    this.smth = 3;

    // this instance has a `setters` object that inherits all its methods
    this.setters = Object.create(settersPrototype);
    this.setters.parent = this;
}

This way, you have a mild memory cost of a unique { parent: ... } object per instance, but there is a single prototype version each setter function, present on the one-and-only settersPrototype object.

| improve this answer | |
  • What worked was adding the this.<nameOfSubMethod>.parent = this; Thanks a lot! – Jo Colina Mar 9 '17 at 16:39
1

You can do this a few ways. There are others with your prototype approach, but this might make it a bit more clear:

ES5

var TestClassEs5 = function(){
    // With ES5, store the outer this to variable to preserve
    var self = this;
    this.smth = 3;

    this.setters = {
      smth: function (smth) {
        self.smth = smth;
      }
    }

    return this;
}

ES6

const TestClassEs6 = function(){
    this.smth = 3;

    // Using a fat arrow syntax binds the function to the lexical scope
    this.setters = {
      smth: (smth) => this.smth = smth
    }

    return this;
}

JS Bin: http://jsbin.com/qugatacive/edit?js,console

| improve this answer | |

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