242

In the current version of React Router (v3) I can accept a server response and use browserHistory.push to go to the appropriate response page. However, this isn't available in v4, and I'm not sure what the appropriate way to handle this is.

In this example, using Redux, components/app-product-form.js calls this.props.addProduct(props) when a user submits the form. When the server returns a success, the user is taken to the Cart page.

// actions/index.js
export function addProduct(props) {
  return dispatch =>
    axios.post(`${ROOT_URL}/cart`, props, config)
      .then(response => {
        dispatch({ type: types.AUTH_USER });
        localStorage.setItem('token', response.data.token);
        browserHistory.push('/cart'); // no longer in React Router V4
      });
}

How can I make a redirect to the Cart page from function for React Router v4?

  • Just to add to this from the last solution offered and from suggestions in React Router's issues on GitHub, using the context to pass what you need manually is a "no go". Unless I am a library author, there shouldn't be a need to use it. In fact, Facebook recommends against it. – Chris Mar 12 '17 at 13:58
  • @Chris did you find a solution for this ? i need push to a different component in action , same as you have explained here – Mr.G Jun 14 '17 at 14:20
  • @Mr.G, sadly I have not. Last I read was the React Training team that maintains React Router has a redux package available. I haven't had any luck making it work, and they haven't put much work into resolving it. – Chris Jun 14 '17 at 15:03

18 Answers 18

189

You can use the history methods outside of your components. Try by the following way.

First, create a history object used the history package:

// src/history.js

import { createBrowserHistory } from 'history';

export default createBrowserHistory();

Then wrap it in <Router> (please note, you should use import { Router } instead of import { BrowserRouter as Router }):

// src/index.jsx

// ...
import { Router, Route, Link } from 'react-router-dom';
import history from './history';

ReactDOM.render(
  <Provider store={store}>
    <Router history={history}>
      <div>
        <ul>
          <li><Link to="/">Home</Link></li>
          <li><Link to="/login">Login</Link></li>
        </ul>
        <Route exact path="/" component={HomePage} />
        <Route path="/login" component={LoginPage} />
      </div>
    </Router>
  </Provider>,
  document.getElementById('root'),
);

Change your current location from any place, for example:

// src/actions/userActionCreators.js

// ...
import history from '../history';

export function login(credentials) {
  return function (dispatch) {
    return loginRemotely(credentials)
      .then((response) => {
        // ...
        history.push('/');
      });
  };
}

UPD: You can also see a slightly different example in React Router FAQ.

  • 13
    I have tried to do exactly as what @OlegBelostotsky said, but after history.push('some path'), the URL changes but the page does not change. I have to put window.location.reload() after it in some parts of my code just to make it work. However, in one instance I have to keep the redux state tree, and reloading destroys it. Any other solution? – Sandy Brutas Mar 26 '18 at 9:47
  • 1
    @idunno Try use the withRouter higher-order component. – Oleg Belostotsky Mar 26 '18 at 12:03
  • This threw me an error stating: createBrowserHistory is not a function. What can i do? – AKJ Nov 13 '18 at 6:54
  • @AKJ Maybe import createHistory from 'history/createBrowserHistory'; export default createHistory(); will be work. – Oleg Belostotsky Nov 13 '18 at 21:32
  • I find it more logical to use a simple class with methods for route navigation than using the react-router components. Thanks for this solution! – Simon Somlai Nov 21 '18 at 18:52
273

React Router v4 is fundamentally different from v3 (and earlier) and you cannot do browserHistory.push() like you used to.

This discussion seems related if you want more info:

  • Creating a new browserHistory won't work because <BrowserRouter> creates its own history instance, and listens for changes on that. So a different instance will change the url but not update the <BrowserRouter>.
  • browserHistory is not exposed by react-router in v4, only in v2.

Instead you have a few options to do this:

  • Use the withRouter high-order component

    Instead you should use the withRouter high order component, and wrap that to the component that will push to history. For example:

    import React from "react";
    import { withRouter } from "react-router-dom";
    
    class MyComponent extends React.Component {
      ...
      myFunction() {
        this.props.history.push("/some/Path");
      }
      ...
    }
    export default withRouter(MyComponent);
    

    Check out the official documentation for more info:

    You can get access to the history object’s properties and the closest <Route>'s match via the withRouter higher-order component. withRouter will re-render its component every time the route changes with the same props as <Route> render props: { match, location, history }.


  • Use the context API

    Using the context might be one of the easiest solutions, but being an experimental API it is unstable and unsupported. Use it only when everything else fails. Here's an example:

    import React from "react";
    import PropTypes from "prop-types";
    
    class MyComponent extends React.Component {
      static contextTypes = {
        router: PropTypes.object
      }
      constructor(props, context) {
         super(props, context);
      }
      ...
      myFunction() {
        this.context.router.history.push("/some/Path");
      }
      ...
    }
    

    Have a look at the official documentation on context:

    If you want your application to be stable, don't use context. It is an experimental API and it is likely to break in future releases of React.

    If you insist on using context despite these warnings, try to isolate your use of context to a small area and avoid using the context API directly when possible so that it's easier to upgrade when the API changes.

  • 6
    Yes I did try it. Thanks for asking. :-) So how do you get the context into this action function? So far, it's coming up as undefined. – Chris Mar 10 '17 at 16:48
  • 1
    I have been researching this topic for a few days now and have not been able to get this to work. Even using the example above I keep getting router is undefined in the context. I am currently using react v15.5.10, react-router-dom v4.1.1, prop-types 15.5.10. The documentation around this is sparse and not very clear. – Stu May 17 '17 at 20:05
  • 4
    @Stu this should work this.context.router.history.push('/path'); – Tushar Khatiwada Jun 15 '17 at 5:50
  • 29
    This doesn't answer the question being asked which is how to access history.push OUTSIDE of a component. Using withRouter or the context are not options for when outside of a component. – SunshinyDoyle Nov 17 '17 at 1:38
  • 3
    Solution using withRouter help in my case, thanks. – azul Jan 3 '18 at 11:32
20

This is how I did it:

import React, {Component} from 'react';

export default class Link extends Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.onLogout = this.onLogout.bind(this);
    }
    onLogout() {
        this.props.history.push('/');
    }
    render() {
        return (
            <div>
                <h1>Your Links</h1>
                <button onClick={this.onLogout}>Logout</button>
            </div>
        );
    }
}

Use this.props.history.push('/cart'); to redirect to cart page it will be saved in history object.

Enjoy, Michael.

  • 1
    Yes, it looks like within the components you can push just fine. The only way to affect navigating outside a component is with redirect. – Chris Apr 13 '17 at 0:15
  • 7
    This doesn't answer the question being asked which is how to access history.push OUTSIDE of a component. Using this.props.history is not an option for when outside of a component. – SunshinyDoyle Nov 17 '17 at 1:38
19

According to React Router v4 documentation - Redux Deep Integration session

Deep integration is needed to:

"be able to navigate by dispatching actions"

However, they recommend this approach as an alternative to the "deep integration":

"Rather than dispatching actions to navigate you can pass the history object provided to route components to your actions and navigate with it there."

So you can wrap your component with the withRouter high order component:

export default withRouter(connect(null, { actionCreatorName })(ReactComponent));

which will pass the history API to props. So you can call the action creator passing the history as a param. For example, inside your ReactComponent:

onClick={() => {
  this.props.actionCreatorName(
    this.props.history,
    otherParams
  );
}}

Then, inside your actions/index.js:

export function actionCreatorName(history, param) {
  return dispatch => {
    dispatch({
      type: SOME_ACTION,
      payload: param.data
    });
    history.push("/path");
  };
}
16

Nasty question, took me quite a lot of time, but eventually, I solved it this way:

Wrap your container with withRouter and pass history to your action in mapDispatchToProps function. In action use history.push('/url') to navigate.

Action:

export function saveData(history, data) {
  fetch.post('/save', data)
     .then((response) => {
       ...
       history.push('/url');
     })
};

Container:

import { withRouter } from 'react-router-dom';
...
const mapDispatchToProps = (dispatch, ownProps) => {
  return {
    save: (data) => dispatch(saveData(ownProps.history, data))}
};
export default withRouter(connect(mapStateToProps, mapDispatchToProps)(Container));

This is valid for React Router v4.x.

11

Simplest way in React Router 4 is to use

this.props.history.push('/new/url');

But to use this method, your existing component should have access to history object. We can get access by

  1. If your component is linked to Route directly, then your component already has access to history object.

    eg:

    <Route path="/profile" component={ViewProfile}/>
    

    Here ViewProfile has access to history.

  2. If not connected to Route directly.

    eg:

    <Route path="/users" render={() => <ViewUsers/>}
    

    Then we have to use withRouter, a heigher order fuction to warp the existing component.

    Inside ViewUsers component

    • import { withRouter } from 'react-router-dom';

    • export default withRouter(ViewUsers);

    That's it now, your ViewUsers component has access to history object.

UPDATE

2- in this scenario, pass all route props to your component, and then we can access this.props.history from the component even without a HOC

eg:

<Route path="/users" render={props => <ViewUsers {...props} />}
  • 2
    The second method worked for me. – aalaap Jan 5 at 7:05
  • Excellent! Your second method also did the trick for me, as my component (which needs access to this.props.history) comes from a HOC, which means that it is not directly linked to the Route, as you explain. – cjauvin Feb 18 at 19:34
6

this.context.history.push will not work.

I managed to get push working like this:

static contextTypes = {
    router: PropTypes.object
}

handleSubmit(e) {
    e.preventDefault();

    if (this.props.auth.success) {
        this.context.router.history.push("/some/Path")
    }

}
  • 6
    This doesn't answer the question being asked which is how to access history.push OUTSIDE of a component. Using this.context is not an option for when outside of a component. – SunshinyDoyle Nov 17 '17 at 1:40
5

In this case you're passing props to your thunk. So you can simply call

props.history.push('/cart')

If this isn't the case you can still pass history from your component

export function addProduct(data, history) {
  return dispatch => {
    axios.post('/url', data).then((response) => {
      dispatch({ type: types.AUTH_USER })
      history.push('/cart')
    })
  }
}
5

I offer one more solution in case it is worthful for someone else.

I have a history.js file where I have the following:

import createHistory from 'history/createBrowserHistory'
const history = createHistory()
history.pushLater = (...args) => setImmediate(() => history.push(...args))
export default history

Next, on my Root where I define my router I use the following:

import history from '../history'
import { Provider } from 'react-redux'
import { Router, Route, Switch } from 'react-router-dom'

export default class Root extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
     <Provider store={store}>
      <Router history={history}>
       <Switch>
        ...
       </Switch>
      </Router>
     </Provider>
    )
   }
  }

Finally, on my actions.js I import History and make use of pushLater

import history from './history'
export const login = createAction(
...
history.pushLater({ pathname: PATH_REDIRECT_LOGIN })
...)

This way, I can push to new actions after API calls.

Hope it helps!

3

Use Callback. It worked for me!

export function addProduct(props, callback) {
  return dispatch =>
    axios.post(`${ROOT_URL}/cart`, props, config)
    .then(response => {
    dispatch({ type: types.AUTH_USER });
    localStorage.setItem('token', response.data.token);
    callback();
  });
}

In component, you just have to add the callback

this.props.addProduct(props, () => this.props.history.push('/cart'))
2

Here's my hack (this is my root-level file, with a little redux mixed in there - though I'm not using react-router-redux):

const store = configureStore()
const customHistory = createBrowserHistory({
  basename: config.urlBasename || ''
})

ReactDOM.render(
  <Provider store={store}>
    <Router history={customHistory}>
      <Route component={({history}) => {
        window.appHistory = history
        return (
          <App />
        )
      }}/>
    </Router>
  </Provider>,
  document.getElementById('root')
)

I can then use window.appHistory.push() anywhere I want (for example, in my redux store functions/thunks/sagas, etc) I had hoped I could just use window.customHistory.push() but for some reason react-router never seemed to update even though the url changed. But this way I have the EXACT instance react-router uses. I don't love putting stuff in the global scope, and this is one of the few things I'd do that with. But it's better than any other alternative I've seen IMO.

2

If you are using Redux, then I would recommend using npm package react-router-redux. It allows you to dispatch Redux store navigation actions.

You have to create store as described in their Readme file.

The easiest use case:

import { push } from 'react-router-redux'

this.props.dispatch(push('/second page'));

Second use case with Container/Component:

Container:

import { connect } from 'react-redux';
import { push } from 'react-router-redux';

import Form from '../components/Form';

const mapDispatchToProps = dispatch => ({
  changeUrl: url => dispatch(push(url)),
});

export default connect(null, mapDispatchToProps)(Form);

Component:

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import PropTypes from 'prop-types';

export default class Form extends Component {
  handleClick = () => {
    this.props.changeUrl('/secondPage');
  };

  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <button onClick={this.handleClick}/>
      </div>Readme file
    );
  }
}
  • 1
    This does not work with react-router-redux unless you are using the next version, which is still under development at this moment! – froginvasion Nov 24 '17 at 11:35
2

I was able to accomplish this by using bind(). I wanted to click a button in index.jsx, post some data to the server, evaluate the response, and redirect to success.jsx. Here's how I worked that out...

index.jsx:

import React, { Component } from "react"
import { postData } from "../../scripts/request"

class Main extends Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props)
        this.handleClick = this.handleClick.bind(this)
        this.postData = postData.bind(this)
    }

    handleClick() {
        const data = {
            "first_name": "Test",
            "last_name": "Guy",
            "email": "test@test.com"
        }

        this.postData("person", data)
    }

    render() {
        return (
            <div className="Main">
                <button onClick={this.handleClick}>Test Post</button>
            </div>
        )
    }
}

export default Main

request.js:

import { post } from "./fetch"

export const postData = function(url, data) {
    // post is a fetch() in another script...
    post(url, data)
        .then((result) => {
            if (result.status === "ok") {
                this.props.history.push("/success")
            }
        })
}

success.jsx:

import React from "react"

const Success = () => {
    return (
        <div className="Success">
            Hey cool, got it.
        </div>
    )
}

export default Success

So by binding this to postData in index.jsx, I was able to access this.props.history in request.js... then I can reuse this function in different components, just have to make sure I remember to include this.postData = postData.bind(this) in the constructor().

0

you can use it like this as i do it for login and manny different things

class Login extends Component {
  constructor(props){
    super(props);
    this.login=this.login.bind(this)
  }


  login(){
this.props.history.push('/dashboard');
  }


render() {

    return (

   <div>
    <button onClick={this.login}>login</login>
    </div>

)
0
/*Step 1*/
myFunction(){  this.props.history.push("/home"); }
/**/
 <button onClick={()=>this.myFunction()} className={'btn btn-primary'}>Go 
 Home</button>
  • No need for any imports ! – David Bagdasaryan Mar 10 '18 at 8:12
  • 1
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. – rollstuhlfahrer Mar 10 '18 at 9:51
0

step one wrap your app in Router

import { BrowserRouter as Router } from "react-router-dom";
ReactDOM.render(<Router><App /></Router>, document.getElementById('root'));

Now my entire App will have access to BrowserRouter. Step two I import Route and then pass down those props. Probably in one of your main files.

import { Route } from "react-router-dom";

//lots of code here

//somewhere in my render function

    <Route
      exact
      path="/" //put what your file path is here
      render={props => (
      <div>
        <NameOfComponent
          {...props} //this will pass down your match, history, location objects
        />
      </div>
      )}
    />

Now if I run console.log(this.props) in my component js file that I should get something that looks like this

{match: {…}, location: {…}, history: {…}, //other stuff }

Step 2 I can access the history object to change my location

//lots of code here relating to my whatever request I just ran delete, put so on

this.props.history.push("/") // then put in whatever url you want to go to

Also I'm just a coding bootcamp student, so I'm no expert, but I know you can also you use

window.location = "/" //wherever you want to go

Correct me if I'm wrong, but when I tested that out it reloaded the entire page which I thought defeated the entire point of using React.

0

React router V4 now allows the history prop to be used as below:

this.props.history.push("/dummy",value)

The value then can be accessed wherever the location prop is available as state:{value} not component state.

  • This doesn't answer the question being asked which is how to access history.push OUTSIDE of a component. Using this.props.history is not an option for when outside of a component. – Arkady Mar 11 at 13:00
0

so the way I do it is: - instead of redirecting using history.push, I just use Redirect component from react-router-dom When using this component you can just pass push=true, and it will take care of the rest

import * as React from 'react';
import { Redirect } from 'react-router-dom';
class Example extends React.Component {
  componentDidMount() {
    this.setState({
      redirectTo: '/test/path'
    });
  }

  render() {
    const { redirectTo } = this.state;

    return <Redirect to={{pathname: redirectTo}} push={true}/>
  }
}

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