6

I have a parent class with two subclasses:

abstract class Point {
    public readonly x: number;
    public readonly y: number;

    constructor(x: number, y: number) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    diff(point: Point): Point {
        return this.update(this.x - point.x, this.y - point.y);
    }
    // many methods like diff(); and then...

    protected abstract update(x: number, y: number): Point;
}



class ImmutablePoint extends Point {
    protected update(x: number, y: number): Point {
        return new ImmutablePoint(x, y);
    }
}



class MutablePoint extends Point {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;

    protected update(x: number, y: number): Point {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        return this;
    }
}


const pointA: ImmutablePoint = new ImmutablePoint(10, 10)
const pointB: ImmutablePoint = new ImmutablePoint(6, 2);

But diff() method returns a Point, not a ImmutablePoint

// Error: type 'Point' is not assignable to parameter of type 'ImmutablePoint'.
const result: ImmutablePoint = pointA.diff(pointB);

I'm looking for a way to re-define the method signature on the subclass without writing a new implementation, is it possible?

I also tried to make diff() return value this but it doesn't work because ImmutablePoint doesn't return this but a new ImmutablePoint

Playground Link

  • 1
    Why note just make result of type Point? Code to the "interface" instead. – Carcigenicate Mar 9 '17 at 21:11
  • Yes, in fact you can use the superclass as type instead of the subclass anywhere but the reason why we have ImmutablePoints is to be used mainly as (immutable) parameters, and a Point has to be casted every time. Quite annoying. Actually just saw the error I pasted says "parameter of type" :P – A. Matías Quezada Mar 9 '17 at 21:13
6

You can make Point generic:

abstract class Point<T extends Point<any>> {
    public readonly x: number;
    public readonly y: number;

    constructor(x: number, y: number) {
        ...
    }

    diff(point: Point<any>): T {
        return this.update(this.x - point.x, this.y - point.y);
    }

    protected abstract update(x: number, y: number): T;
}

class ImmutablePoint extends Point<ImmutablePoint> {
    protected update(x: number, y: number): ImmutablePoint {
        return new ImmutablePoint(x, y);
    }
}

class MutablePoint extends Point<MutablePoint> {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;

    protected update(x: number, y: number): MutablePoint {
        ...
        return this;
    }
}


const pointA: ImmutablePoint = new ImmutablePoint(10, 10)
const pointB: ImmutablePoint = new ImmutablePoint(6, 2);
const result: ImmutablePoint = pointA.diff(pointB); // fine

(code in playground)

With the new Default generic type variables feature available you should be able to do something like:

abstract class Point<T extends Point = Point> {
  ...
}

(haven't tested it yet)

1

You can have this as a return type and you can access the constructor of your current object with this.constructor. That allows you to work more easily with subclassed immutables.

abstract class Point {
    public readonly x: number;
    public readonly y: number;

    constructor(x: number, y: number) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    diff(point: Point): this {
        return this.update(this.x - point.x, this.y - point.y);
    }
    // many methods like diff(); and then...

    protected abstract update(x: number, y: number): this;
}



class ImmutablePoint extends Point {
    protected update(x: number, y: number): this {
        return this.constructor(x, y);
    }
}



class MutablePoint extends Point {
    public x: number;
    public y: number;

    protected update(x: number, y: number): this {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        return this;
    }
}


const pointA: ImmutablePoint = new ImmutablePoint(10, 10)
const pointB: ImmutablePoint = new ImmutablePoint(6, 2);
const result: ImmutablePoint = pointA.diff(pointB);

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