50

I created a new Entity Frameworks Code First app and the DbSet (People) is returning null.

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Repository : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Person> People;
}

web.config: connection string

<connectionStrings>
  <add name="Repository"
       connectionString="Data Source=|DataDirectory|Repository.sdf"
       providerName="System.Data.SqlServerCe.4.0"/>
</connectionStrings>

Now when I call

Repository _repo = new Repository()
_repo.People;

_repo.People will be null

What I am missing?

  • Microsoft.Data.Entity.Ctp.dll is referenced
  • I have tried with and without a database initializer.
80

That's because you define a field of DbSet<Person> on Repository class instead of a property. Once you add a property or change it to be a automatic property,People will start to give you values instead of null. So all you need to do is to change your Repository class to:

public class Repository : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Person> People { get; set; }
}
10
  • 7
    WOW! I feel stupid! I cannot believe I did not see that after staring at it for hours. Thank You! Nov 25 '10 at 16:55
  • 3
    I just made the same mistake. Stared at the da*n thing for two hours yesterday and then clicked... The worst part is that you get an error about parameter:source being null, which is a red herring.
    – Jim
    Feb 4 '11 at 6:07
  • 3
    I feel like a freaking idiot right now. Thanks, you lifesaver! Jul 5 '11 at 6:32
  • 6
    It can also come up null if you try to use { get; private set; }. EF doesn't like that.
    – Ryan Lundy
    May 10 '14 at 23:19
  • 2
    Nor should the setter be protected. It should be public: { get; set; }
    – arni
    Aug 31 '16 at 13:30
47

I just had the same issue. The problem was that I did set these properties as 'internal' while they must have been 'public'. Just in case someone is still searching :)

2
  • 5
    anyone know why you can set them to internal at all?
    – Guy Lowe
    May 30 '14 at 0:10
  • @GuyLowe Because a db context is just another class. C# analysers haven't always been clever enough to flag these things as warnings. Now I'm wondering whether the same issue exists in .NET Core/EF Core.
    – Alternatex
    12 hours ago
5

I just had the same issue. The problem was that I did set these properties as 'internal' while they must have been 'public'. Just in case someone is still searching :)

I guess, these properties can be internal/public too, if you use them like this:

public class Repository : DbContext
{
    internal DbSet<Person> People { get; set; }

    public Repository()
    {
        //your code here...
        People = Set<Person>();
    }
}
1
  • 1
    That's a very clever way to have the best of both worlds. Thanks Apr 12 '19 at 9:09

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