92

For example, in one place...

//---------------a
try
{
    // some network call
}
catch(WebException we)
{
    throw new MyCustomException("some message ....", we);
}

...and in another place...

//--------------b
try
{
    // invoke code above
}
catch(MyCustomException we)
{
    Debug.Writeline(we.stacktrace);   // <----------------
}

The stacktrace I print, it only start from a to b, it doesnt include the inner stacktrace from the WebException.

How can I print all the stacktrace???

  • 1
    Note that the stacktrace for the originating WebException would not be printed because you threw a new exception rather than re-throwing the WebException. Use throw; in lieu of throw new MyCustomException(...) if you want to preserve (and output) the original exception stack. – Beel Dec 25 '16 at 13:19
166

I usually use the .ToString() method on exceptions to present the full exception information (including the inner stack trace) in text:

catch (MyCustomException ex)
{
    Debug.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
}

Sample output:

ConsoleApplication1.MyCustomException: some message .... ---> System.Exception: Oh noes!
   at ConsoleApplication1.SomeObject.OtherMethod() in C:\ConsoleApplication1\SomeObject.cs:line 24
   at ConsoleApplication1.SomeObject..ctor() in C:\ConsoleApplication1\SomeObject.cs:line 14
   --- End of inner exception stack trace ---
   at ConsoleApplication1.SomeObject..ctor() in C:\ConsoleApplication1\SomeObject.cs:line 18
   at ConsoleApplication1.Program.DoSomething() in C:\ConsoleApplication1\Program.cs:line 23
   at ConsoleApplication1.Program.Main(String[] args) in C:\ConsoleApplication1\Program.cs:line 13
  • Very good. I was looking for a simple way to do it and here it is. Some little concern is it is not as much explicit as if you use exception.StackTrace object (for example). I wonder if there is a more explicit way to do the same? – codea May 7 '14 at 16:29
  • 4
    Be aware that some libraries override the ToString method and print custom messages instead of the full information (this is a bad coding practice, so do not do that, ever) – Dinei Jan 28 '16 at 18:05
  • @Pரதீப் I use ToString whenever I'm sure it is not overwritten, and use the properties directly otherwise (like Andrew Hare's answer). – Dinei Aug 24 '18 at 14:25
52

Use a function like this:

    public static string FlattenException(Exception exception)
    {
        var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();

        while (exception != null)
        {
            stringBuilder.AppendLine(exception.Message);
            stringBuilder.AppendLine(exception.StackTrace);

            exception = exception.InnerException;
        }

        return stringBuilder.ToString();
    }

Then you can call it like this:

try
{
    // invoke code above
}
catch(MyCustomException we)
{
    Debug.Writeline(FlattenException(we));
}
  • 13
    Or you can use ToString? – Justin Nov 24 '10 at 23:55
  • I'm using the ToString and think it's fine. I'd go with Andrew's solution if i only want the lowest inner exception (with the actual reason) or similar picking.. works both though :) – EeKay May 1 '13 at 8:24
  • This is more flexible that just ToString, because you can choose what goes into that string. Maybe I'm only interested in the stack traces, not necessarily the messages. Or I want it as a List<string> not a single string. – Zar Shardan Sep 9 at 9:28
14

1. Create Method: If you pass your exception to the following function, it will give you all methods and details which are reasons of the exception.

public string GetAllFootprints(Exception x)
{
        var st = new StackTrace(x, true);
        var frames = st.GetFrames();
        var traceString = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (var frame in frames)
        {
            if (frame.GetFileLineNumber() < 1)
                continue;

            traceString.Append("File: " + frame.GetFileName());
            traceString.Append(", Method:" + frame.GetMethod().Name);
            traceString.Append(", LineNumber: " + frame.GetFileLineNumber());
            traceString.Append("  -->  ");
        }

        return traceString.ToString();
}

2. Call Method: You can call the method like this.

try
{
    // code part which you want to catch exception on it
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    Debug.Writeline(GetAllFootprints(ex));
}

3. Get the Result:

File: c:\MyProject\Program.cs, Method:MyFunction, LineNumber: 29  -->  
File: c:\MyProject\Program.cs, Method:Main, LineNumber: 16  --> 

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