11

I'm a bit confused. I have the new version of Visual Studio 2017. And have converted my class projects (.net full 4.5) to the new .csproj project format. Then I tried to run live tests on those projects, but VS now informs me that live testing is not supported on .net core projects jet.

So:

  1. Are those projects now .Net Core projects?
  2. If Yes, can I use the new .csproj project file for the old good .Net Full 4.x
  3. I am planning to deploy my application as WebApi services to a windows server only, and I'm planning to use NHibernate ORM, so movig to .net Core is excluded, are there any benefit of using this new .csproj format for my case?
  4. Can I use the new .csproj format and keep using non .Net Core compatible libraries like NHibernate?

Thanks

  • 3
    You should probably consider using .NET Standard as your portable class libraries, if the API provided is enough for you. Then you can reference it in all types of projects, full .NET Framework or .NET Core. – Neme Mar 10 '17 at 21:03
  • Ok, You didn't answer any of my question, also I wrote in my post that I plan to use NHibernate which is NOT .Net core and .Net standard compatible. – Luka Mar 11 '17 at 17:03
  • 2
    I didn't, that's why I posted a comment, not an answer. Sorry for trying to help. – Neme Mar 11 '17 at 17:52
  • Hi, I'm currently asking me the same question. Do you have any updates on this ? – Antoine Blanchet Dec 5 '17 at 5:28
  • With the latest update to VS 2017, all projects are converted in the new .csproj file format. And yes, you can still use the full .net framework ie (.net framework 4.7.1). – Luka Dec 8 '17 at 15:27
6

I like the new format for .net 4.0 projects, it's way easier not having to worry about including files to your project also having less files to deal with nuget is nice as well.

You can start out with a csproj as simple as this

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">

  <PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFramework>net40</TargetFramework>
  </PropertyGroup>

</Project>

And then use visual studio to add back in your dependencies, move the meta data to the packages tab and remove AssemblyInfo.cs, and then customize anything you had custom (hint sometimes excluding and re-including files can help to get the default behavior if you have something strange e.g. T4 templates). It will be a much cleaner file and way easier to update to .netstandard in the future (or even multitarget).

Here is an example of an opensource project of mine using multi-target and some T4 templates this is the full file and there are like 40 C# files automatically included in the project because they are in the directory:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">
    <PropertyGroup>
        <TargetFrameworks>netstandard1.5;net40</TargetFrameworks>
        <Description>(pronounced dyna-mighty) flexes DLR muscle to do meta-mazing things in .net</Description>
        <Company>Ekon Benefits</Company>
        <Authors/>
        <Copyright>Copyright 2017 Ekon Benefits</Copyright>
        <AssemblyVersion>1.5.0.0</AssemblyVersion>
        <FileVersion>1.5.0.0</FileVersion>
        <PackageProjectUrl>https://github.com/ekonbenefits/dynamitey</PackageProjectUrl>
        <PackageLicenseUrl>http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0</PackageLicenseUrl>
        <PackageTags>dynamic metaprogramming dlr reflection currying tuples expando latetypes</PackageTags>
        <IncludeSymbols>True</IncludeSymbols>
        <IncludeSource>True</IncludeSource>
        <GeneratePackageOnBuild>True</GeneratePackageOnBuild>
        <PackageRequireLicenseAcceptance>True</PackageRequireLicenseAcceptance>
        <SignAssembly>True</SignAssembly>
        <AssemblyOriginatorKeyFile>sn.snk</AssemblyOriginatorKeyFile>
        <DelaySign>False</DelaySign>
        <Version>1.5.0</Version>
    </PropertyGroup>
    <ItemGroup Condition="'$(TargetFramework)'!='net40'">
        <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.CSharp" Version="4.3.0"/>
        <PackageReference Include="System.ComponentModel" Version="4.3.0"/>
    </ItemGroup>
    <ItemGroup Condition="'$(TargetFramework)'=='net40'">
        <Reference Include="Microsoft.CSharp"/>
    </ItemGroup>
    <ItemGroup>
        <None Update="InlineLambdas.tt">
            <Generator>TextTemplatingFileGenerator</Generator>
            <LastGenOutput>InlineLambdas.cs</LastGenOutput>
        </None>
        <None Update="ThisFunctions.tt">
            <Generator>TextTemplatingFileGenerator</Generator>
            <LastGenOutput>ThisFunctions.cs</LastGenOutput>
        </None>
    </ItemGroup>
    <ItemGroup>
        <Compile Update="InlineLambdas.cs">
            <DesignTime>True</DesignTime>
            <AutoGen>True</AutoGen>
            <DependentUpon>InlineLambdas.tt</DependentUpon>
        </Compile>
        <Compile Update="ThisFunctions.cs">
            <DesignTime>True</DesignTime>
            <AutoGen>True</AutoGen>
            <DependentUpon>ThisFunctions.tt</DependentUpon>
        </Compile>
    </ItemGroup>
</Project>
  • 1
    Oh I like it, but I don't understand some things ie.: 1. Why there is no template for .net FULL framework for this new .csproj type, only for .net core and .net standard. – Luka Mar 23 '17 at 17:41
  • 2. If I want to create class diagrams from classes, it says that this project type is not compatible with the format. – Luka Mar 23 '17 at 17:42
  • 1
    3. If I remove AssemblyInfo file, then what about InternalsVisibleTo assembly attribute, where to put it? – Luka Mar 23 '17 at 17:43
  • 1. I don't know why there isn't a VS template you can just add, but they don't have any GUI for creating multi-targeting, but once you make it, the GUI works great with it, it's how I figured out a lot of options. – jbtule Mar 23 '17 at 17:52
  • 1
    thanks about the info on InternalsVisibleTo. I move some of my projects to the new .csproj files, but there seems that it's not mature enought. Ie. I can't use live testing on this new project type, it complains that it is not supported on .net core. It seems that Visual studio thisnks of this new .csproj format as .net core projects. – Luka Mar 24 '17 at 8:25

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.