I have a Generic Repository like below which handles my CRUD, for a single entity its easy to use, problem starts when i try to join my POCOs.

Lets say I have these POCO, they are mapped using fluent api (many to many and One to many relation) :

public class Student
{
    public Student() 
    {
        this.Courses = new HashSet<Course>();
    }

    public int StudentId { get; set; }
    public string StudentName { get; set; }

    //FKs 
    public virtual Standard Standard { get; set; }
    public int StdandardRefId { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Course> Courses { get; set; }
}

public class Course
{
    public Course()
    {
        this.Students = new HashSet<Student>();
    }

    public int CourseId { get; set; }
    public string CourseName { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Student> Students { get; set; }
}
public class Standard
{
    public Standard()
    {
        Students = new List<Student>();
    }
    public int StandardId { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Student> Students { get; set; }
}

Mapping:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    //Many-To-Many
    modelBuilder.Entity<Student>()
                .HasMany<Course>(s => s.Courses)
                .WithMany(c => c.Students)
                .Map(cs =>
                        {
                            cs.MapLeftKey("StudentRefId");
                            cs.MapRightKey("CourseRefId");
                            cs.ToTable("StudentCourse");
                        });
        //One-To-Many
        modelBuilder.Entity<Student>()
                .HasRequired<Standard>(s => s.Standard)
                .WithMany(s => s.Students)
                .HasForeignKey(s => s.StandardId);

}

Generic Repository:

public class Repository<T> : IRepository<T>
    where T : class, IDisposable
{
    internal MyDbContext context;
    internal DbSet<T> dbSet;

    public Repository()
    {
        context = new MyDbContext();
        this.dbSet = context.Set<T>();
    }

    public bool Add(T entity)
    {
        var query = dbSet.Add(entity);

        if (query != null)
            return true;
        return false;
    }

    public bool Update(T entity)
    {
        dbSet.Attach(entity);
        var query = context.Entry(entity).State = EntityState.Modified;

        if (query == EntityState.Modified)
            return true;
        return false;
    }
    public bool Delete(T entity)
    {
        var query = dbSet.Remove(entity);

        if (query != null)
            return true;
        return false;
    }
    public bool Delete(Guid id)
    {
        var query = dbSet.Remove(dbSet.Find(id));

        if (query != null)
            return true;
        return false;
    }
    public T GetById(Guid id)
    {
        var query = dbSet.Find(id);

        if (query != null)
            return query;
        else
            return null;
    }
    public ICollection<T> GetAll()
    {
        return dbSet.AsEnumerable<T>().ToList();
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        context.SaveChanges();
    }
    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (context != null)
        {
            context.Dispose();
            context = null;
        }
    }
}

Now if i want to join Standard to Many-to-Many Table how may i be able to do this?

  • 2
    I see this question appear over and over again, but still don't understand why people use generic repository pattern with EF. Looks completely useless to me, and as you see only brings unnecessary headache. – Evk Mar 11 '17 at 9:37
  • Could you clarify your question a bit, please? I don't see how you'd want to join these two tables, or why. – Akos Nagy Mar 11 '17 at 11:51
  • @Evk so you suggest not using generic repository? may i ask why – Valkyrie Mar 11 '17 at 12:34
  • 1
    Well that's I should ask you why you are using it. You cannot make any complex queries, even simple join. To update two different entities you have to create two repositories and open 2 database connections, and even wrap that into transaction. Only drawbacks with almost zero benefits. Does not make any sense to me. – Evk Mar 11 '17 at 12:56
up vote 12 down vote accepted

So based on your edit, I'm assuming you would like to join Students and Standards.

The first thing you have to do is change the repository so that it doesn't instantiate the context. You should pass that in as a parameter and store a reference to it:

public Repository(MyDbContext myCtx)
{
    context = myCtx;
    this.dbSet = context.Set<T>();
}

The second thing you have to do is change your repository to change the GetAll() method to return IQueryable<T> instead of ICollection<T>.

Then change the implementation of GetAll():

return dbSet;

This way you only get back a query and not the evaluated list of all the entities. And then you can do the join with the GetAll() method of the repositories just like you would do it with the db sets:

using (MyDbContext ctx = new MyDbContext())
{
  var studentRep = new Repository<Student>(ctx);
  var standardRep = new Repository<Standard>(ctx);
  var studentToStandard = studentRep.GetAll().Join(standardRep.GetAll(), 
                        student => student.StandardRefId,
                        standard => standard.StandardId,
                        (stud, stand) => new { Student=stud, Standard=stand }).ToList();
}

With this you get an IQueryable<T> in studentToStandard, which will run in the database once you call ToList() on it. Note that you have to pass in the same context to both of the repositories in order for this to work.

I recommend that you check out the Unit Of Work design pattern as well. It helps a lot when dealing with multiple repositories.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/mvc/overview/older-versions/getting-started-with-ef-5-using-mvc-4/implementing-the-repository-and-unit-of-work-patterns-in-an-asp-net-mvc-application

This is a more structured and better maintainable way of handling transactions when it comes to multiple entity sets, and promotes better separation of concerns.

Hope I understood your problem correctly and this helps.

  • 1
    And what purpose exactly does "Repository" serves here? – Evk Mar 11 '17 at 14:23
  • 3
    I was just trying to answer the question: joins when using repository. I agree that on their own respositories aren't very useful. That's why I included a link to an implementation with UoW. Add the UoW, add some interfaces and use a DI container, and you can totally separate your BLL from your DAL. In my experience this is good, because you can mock your interfaces more easily than a DbContext for testing and you can replace the whole data access technology. We used this in our projects before and now we can move to EFCore and enjoy the performance benefits without having to retest the BLL. – Akos Nagy Mar 11 '17 at 16:03
  • @AkosNagy Well explained my vote up for you sir. That's exactly i am going for, Using UoW And Dependency injection Pattern, i just need to get the pieces together right first. Forgive me for asking but you know any good tutorial on UoW and Mixing it with Dependency injection? – Valkyrie Mar 11 '17 at 17:04
  • Unfortunately I haven't come across any comprehensive tutorial on both. The link in my post is a reference for me about UoW and repository. My choice of DI container is Autofac, so the Autofac documentation is my reference there. What is the technology you're using? I might have some ASP.NET Web API samples lying around, if that would be any help for you. – Akos Nagy Mar 11 '17 at 17:32
  • Note that EF DbContext already follows UoW pattern. – Evk Mar 11 '17 at 18:39

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.