17

I have an alert box to confirm that the user has successfully subscribed:

<div className="alert alert-success">
    <strong>Success!</strong> Thank you for subscribing!
</div>    

When a user sends an email, I'm changing the "subscribed" state to true.

What I want is to:

  • Show the alert box when the subscribed state is true
  • Wait for 2 seconds
  • Make it fade out

How can I do this?

0

3 Answers 3

33

May 2021 update: as tolga and Alexey Nikonov correctly noted in their answers, it’s possible to give away control over how long the alert is being shown (in the original question, 2 seconds) to the transition-delay property and a smart component state management based on the transitionend DOM event. Also, hooks are these days recommended to handle component’s internal state, not setState. So I updated my answer a bit:

function App(props) {
  const [isShowingAlert, setShowingAlert] = React.useState(false);
  
  return (
      <div>
        <div
          className={`alert alert-success ${isShowingAlert ? 'alert-shown' : 'alert-hidden'}`}
          onTransitionEnd={() => setShowingAlert(false)}
        >
          <strong>Success!</strong> Thank you for subscribing!
        </div>
        <button onClick={() => setShowingAlert(true)}>
          Show alert
        </button>
        (and other children)
      </div>
    );
}

The delay is then specified in the alert-hidden class in CSS:

.alert-hidden {
  opacity: 0;
  transition: all 250ms linear 2s; // <- the last value defines transition-delay
}

The actual change of isShowingAlert is, in fact, near-instant: from false to true, then immediately from true to false. But because the transition to opacity: 0 is delayed by 2 seconds, the user sees the message for this duration.

Feel free to play around with Codepen with this example.


Since React renders data into DOM, you need to keep a variable that first has one value, and then another, so that the message is first shown and then hidden. You could remove the DOM element directly with jQuery's fadeOut, but manipulating DOM can cause problems.

So, the idea is, you have a certain property that can have one of two values. The closest implementation is a boolean. Since a message box is always in DOM, it's a child of some element. In React, an element is result of rendering a component, and so when you render a component, it can have as many children as you want. So you could add a message box to it.

Next, this component has to have a certain property that you can easily change and be completely sure that, as soon as you change it, the component gets re-rendered with new data. It's component state!

class App extends React.Component {
  constructor() {
    super();
    this.state = {
      showingAlert: false
    };
  }
  
  handleClickShowAlert() {
    this.setState({
      showingAlert: true
    });
    
    setTimeout(() => {
      this.setState({
        showingAlert: false
      });
    }, 2000);
  }
  
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <div className={`alert alert-success ${this.state.showingAlert ? 'alert-shown' : 'alert-hidden'}`}>
          <strong>Success!</strong> Thank you for subscribing!
        </div>
        <button onClick={this.handleClickShowAlert.bind(this)}>
          Show alert
        </button>
        (and other children)
      </div>
    );
  }
}

Here, you can see that, for message box, either alert-shown or alert-hidden classname is set, depending on the value (truthiness) of showingAlert property of component state. You can then use transition CSS property to make hiding/showing appearance smooth.

So, instead of waiting for the user to click button to show the message box, you need to update component state on a certain event, obviously.

That should be good to start with. Next, try to play around with CSS transitions, display and height CSS properties of the message box, to see how it behaves and if the smooth transition happening in these cases.

Good luck!

PS. See a Codepen for that.

4
  • Great solution! I started using Semantic UI React recently and they have a component for this; I set it up with a visibility state and a timeout as above and it works great: react.semantic-ui.com/modules/transition.
    – liquidki
    Sep 23, 2018 at 12:00
  • 1
    DO NOT USE THING APPROACH: using Timeout is an Antipatern. Instead use generic Transition Because you may not know the duration set as Fade-In/Out transition (for example in Bootstrap) May 14, 2021 at 9:36
  • Hey Alexey Nikonov, thanks a lot for your suggestion! I think your idea works way better because the control over the alert’s state of being shown or hidden stays within one place, the transition-delay style property of the CSS class responsible for hiding it. I updated my answer with a new example.
    – rishat
    May 15, 2021 at 18:19
  • 1
    This is brilliant :) Thanks
    – heady12
    May 10 at 1:48
7

The correct way is to use Transition handler for Fade-in/out

In ReactJS there is synthetic event to wait till fade-out is finished: onTransitionEnd.

NOTE there are different css effects associated with different handlers. Fade is a Transition not an Animation effect.

Here is my example:

const Backdrop = () => {
  const {isDropped, hideIt} = useContext(BackdropContext);
  const [isShown, setState] = useState(true);
  const removeItFromDOM = () => {
    debugger
    setState(false)
  };
  return isShown
    ? <div className={`modal-backdrop ${isDropped ? 'show' : ''} fade` } onClick={hideIt} onTransitionEnd={removeItFromDOM}/>
    : null
}
0
3

An other way is to solve this with a CSS3 transition. https://www.tutorialspoint.com/css/css_animation_fade_out.htm

You can add a new class to the alert (like .hidden) and then you can relate .hidden with the class you defined for the alert.

alert.hidden{
    // Here you can define a css transition
}

In this solution you don't have to add a setInterval or anything, since css3 transitions already process it on browser render.

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