31

I have a project that uses arrays of objects that I'm thinking of moving to es6 Sets or Maps.

I need to quickly get a random item from them (obviously trivial for my current arrays). How would I do this?

1
  • 1
    Sets and Maps are not suitable for such random access (if you do not know the keys). You would end up iterating the keys or values. See this and this.
    – trincot
    Commented Mar 11, 2017 at 19:00

5 Answers 5

35

Maps and Sets are not well suited for random access. They are ordered and their length is known, but they are not indexed for access by an order index. As such, to get the Nth item in a Map or Set, you have to iterate through it to find that item.

The simple way to get a random item from a Set or Map would be to get the entire list of keys/items and then select a random one.

// get random item from a Set
function getRandomItem(set) {
    let items = Array.from(set);
    return items[Math.floor(Math.random() * items.length)];
}

You could make a version that would work with both a Set and a Map like this:

// returns random key from Set or Map
function getRandomKey(collection) {
    let keys = Array.from(collection.keys());
    return keys[Math.floor(Math.random() * keys.length)];
}

This is obviously not something that would perform well with a large Set or Map since it has to iterate all the keys and build a temporary array in order to select a random one.


Since both a Map and a Set have a known size, you could also select the random index based purely on the .size property and then you could iterate through the Map or Set until you got to the desired Nth item. For large collections, that might be a bit faster and would avoid creating the temporary array of keys at the expense of a little more code, though on average it would still be proportional to the size/2 of the collection.

// returns random key from Set or Map
function getRandomKey(collection) {
    let index = Math.floor(Math.random() * collection.size);
    let cntr = 0;
    for (let key of collection.keys()) {
        if (cntr++ === index) {
            return key;
        }
    }
}
7
  • 1
    Array.from(set) is probably O(n). Was looking for a O(1) solution:(
    – martian17
    Commented Dec 2, 2020 at 16:18
  • 1
    @Y.Yoshii - A Set or a Map does not support random access by index like an array so there is no efficient way to access a random item in the Set or Map unless you build and maintain a separate array of keys that you can index via an array.
    – jfriend00
    Commented Dec 2, 2020 at 16:20
  • Sorry, I was a bit frustrated because O(1) should be possible if we could access the underlying hash table and the array. First select randomly select a bucket from the table, and select random item inside the bucket. Basically repeat it until getting an item. Hope they implement something like this in the next version of ES.
    – martian17
    Commented Dec 2, 2020 at 16:33
  • @Y.Yoshii - You could implement your own hashing and thus your own Set or Map to get access to the underlying hash table, but this question was about ES6 Sets or Maps where there is no such direct access to the hash table.
    – jfriend00
    Commented Dec 2, 2020 at 16:47
  • I actually did exactly that lol. It's horribly inefficient because of my bad hash function, but at least it's O(1). Thanks for the reply:)
    – martian17
    Commented Dec 2, 2020 at 16:54
12

There's a short neat ES6+ version of the answer above:

const getRandomItem = iterable => iterable.get([...iterable.keys()][Math.floor(Math.random() * iterable.size)])

Works for Maps as well as for Sets (where keys() is an alias for value() method)

1
  • Thanks! short and sweet. I've considered keeping a set-array pair. I'm not sure what is "cheaper", deleting removed set items from the array, or just getting a new keys array.
    – backspaces
    Commented Jun 20, 2018 at 16:37
7

This is the short answer for Sets:

const getRandomItem = set => [...set][Math.floor(Math.random()*set.size)]
0
1

For those needing the function in Typescript:

export function getRandomItem<T>(set: Set<T>): T {
  return Array.from(set)[Math.floor(Math.random() * set.size)];
}
1

It would be O(n) for the process of getting from Map or Set by turning it into an Array everytime you call it.

The better possible approach if you can trade-off memory for accessing performance (prefer in real world) is keep track of Set/Map elements in an separated array and take the random element from that array (which is O(1)).

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