92

I want to write a Spek test in Kotlin. The test should read an HTML file from the src/test/resources folder. How to do it?

class MySpec : Spek({

    describe("blah blah") {

        given("blah blah") {

            var fileContent : String = ""

            beforeEachTest {
                // How to read the file file.html in src/test/resources/html
                fileContent = ...  
            }

            it("should blah blah") {
                ...
            }
        }
    }
})
107
0
val fileContent = MySpec::class.java.getResource("/html/file.html").readText()
| improve this answer | |
  • 30
    For me this didn't work, I had to change it to this::class.java.classLoader.getResource("/html/file.html").readText() – pavlos163 Sep 15 '17 at 14:19
  • 4
    For me both these options worked in an Android app (notice the extra / in one of them, which has to be removed in the other): this::class.java.getResource("/html/file.html").readText() and this::class.java.classLoader.getResource("html/file.html").‌​readText() – Franco Dec 6 '17 at 2:35
  • 18
    val fileContent = javaClass.getResource("/html/file.html").readText() does the job even shorter – Frank Neblung Aug 21 '18 at 10:24
28
0

another slightly different solution:

@Test
fun basicTest() {
    "/html/file.html".asResource {
        // test on `it` here...
        println(it)
    }

}

fun String.asResource(work: (String) -> Unit) {
    val content = this.javaClass::class.java.getResource(this).readText()
    work(content)
}
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  • Nice usage of an extension function! But why do you use a lambda function here? That does not make much sense to me. Furthermore, the this part did not work for me. Thus I recommend the following: fun String.asResource(): URL? = object {}.javaClass.getResource(this) – Qw3ry Jun 26 '19 at 7:48
  • I like this method of working on it where you declare the file, then work on the contents of that file. Personal preference I guess. this in the example above refers to the string object. – jhodges Jul 12 '19 at 20:21
  • that's terrible abuse of extension function. Loading files is not a concern of String class. – Ben Feb 17 at 14:32
  • it is in this context. i wouldn't make this globally available or use it outside of test classes. I consider it more of a mapping function here. – jhodges Feb 18 at 17:43
23
0

No idea why this is so hard, but the simplest way I've found (without having to refer to a particular class) is:

fun getResourceAsText(path: String): String {
    return object {}.javaClass.getResource(path).readText()
}

And then passing in an absolute URL, e.g.

val html = getResourceAsText("/www/index.html")
| improve this answer | |
  • is {} required? Why not just javaClass.getResource(path).readText()? – andrewgazelka Apr 30 '19 at 20:46
  • 1
    javaClass must be called on an object according to the docs kotlinlang.org/api/latest/jvm/stdlib/kotlin.jvm/java-class.html If it works without then go for ya life :) – Russell Briggs May 2 '19 at 20:16
  • 3
    One downside with the method above is it creates a new object for every resource access. Would be better to store the dummy object outside the function. – Russell Briggs May 2 '19 at 20:19
  • @RussellBriggs tbh I don't think that matters much. The performance of an object creation is not really an issue if you do disk access! – Qw3ry Jun 26 '19 at 7:50
13
0

A slightly different solution:

class MySpec : Spek({
    describe("blah blah") {
        given("blah blah") {

            var fileContent = ""

            beforeEachTest {
                html = this.javaClass.getResource("/html/file.html").readText()
            }

            it("should blah blah") {
                ...
            }
        }
    }
})
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  • For some reason this didn't work for me. Only explicitly calling the class worked. Just adding for others. I think it has something to do with tornadofx – nmu Aug 29 '17 at 19:35
  • After creating a test input file in /src/test/resources, this.javaClass.getResource("/<test input filename>") worked as expected. Thanks for the solution above. – jkwuc89 Dec 11 '17 at 14:34
  • what to do, if fileContent is not String and I won't create any dummy object? – minizibi Apr 8 '18 at 13:05
  • 1
    leading slash before the path seems mandatory here, whereas in Java I usually omit it. – cakraww Aug 7 '18 at 5:54
5
0

Kotlin + Spring way:

@Autowired
private lateinit var resourceLoader: ResourceLoader

fun load() {
    val html = resourceLoader.getResource("classpath:html/file.html").file
        .readText(charset = Charsets.UTF_8)
}
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4
0

Using Google Guava library Resources class:

import com.google.common.io.Resources;

val fileContent: String = Resources.getResource("/html/file.html").readText()
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  • it is nice that Guave reports a file name if resource is not found - much better for troubleshooting – Nishi Aug 28 '19 at 17:18
3
0
val fileContent = javaClass.getResource("/html/file.html").readText()
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2
0
private fun loadResource(file: String) = {}::class.java.getResource(file).readText()
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0
0

You might find the File class useful:

import java.io.File

fun main(args: Array<String>) {
  val content = File("src/main/resources/input.txt").readText()
  print(content)
} 
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  • 2
    This answer is misleading. That does not load a "resource" but loads file straight from file system, instead of the classpath. It will no longer work after application is assembled as you will try to refer to nonexisting files, instead of loading them from the jar file. – Ben Feb 9 at 20:51
  • @ben Thanks for your comment. Question was about reading file from resource in kotlin Spek test. – Krzysztof Ziomek Feb 12 at 13:53

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