11

Case A Not following the Getter & Setter convention

human/human.go

package human

type Human interface {
    GetName() string
    SetName(name string)
}

type Person struct {
    Name string
}

func (p Person) GetName() string {
    return p.Name
}

func (p *Person) SetName(name string) {
    p.Name = name
}

main/main.go

package main

func main() {
    john := Person{Name:"john"} // Uppercase Fields are visible
    fmt.Println(john)
}

Case B Following getter and setter convention

package human

type Human interface {
    Name() string
    SetName(name string)
}

type Person struct {
    name string
}

func (p Person) Name() string {
    return p.name
}

func (p *Person) SetName(name string) {
    p.name = name
}

main/main.go

package main

func main() {
    john := Person(name: "John") // lowercase name is not visible outside the package
}

The problem with following convention is that I can't instantiate the struct while providing its field names. I'd like to use the convention but I am stuck with the private access.

2
  • Ask yourself: What is the benefit of a private name? What is the benefit from setters and getters. Then decide. – Volker Mar 11 '17 at 20:21
  • ok, good analogy, what would say if you ask the same to yourself – user7014993 Mar 11 '17 at 20:22
13

When instantiating a structure (or object, in object oriented languages), you should not specify the value of private fields anyway. It can make sense, however, to provide data that may end up in private fields, or be treated in a completely different manner. In this case, OOP warrants the use of a constructor, and the Go convention is a to provide a fuction called New[YourStructure].

func NewPerson(name string) Person {
    return Person{name: name}
}

In this trivial example, the name is simply copied to the private field, but in a more complex example, other operations could take place (e.g. checking that the name is valid, or looking up the name and taking action depending on the result…).

5
  • Zoyd, thanks for the answer. I understood your New[YourStructure] approach, however, is this convention official, i noticed it around on other sites but not sure if it's official? are they using it anywhere at github.com/golang ? – user7014993 Mar 11 '17 at 21:42
  • I don’t know about "official", but it is mentioned in Effective Go (golang.org/doc/effective_go.html#composite_literals) and used all over the place in the standard packages. Open any package in golang.org/pkg and look for New, you’ll find functions called NewThing in many of them. – Zoyd Mar 11 '17 at 21:45
  • I've no problem in using it and I'll accept your answer, but for the sake of argument I'm trying to get the reason behind on why go founders did things in a certain way and there's always a deep meaning behind, founders could have provided constructors but they didn't, meaning they don't want us to use constructors. – user7014993 Mar 11 '17 at 21:47
  • 1
    Then, what you are looking for is probably the sections of the FAQ about (non)-object orientation: golang.org/doc/faq#Is_Go_an_object-oriented_language – Zoyd Mar 11 '17 at 21:50
  • thanks, i found something about New golang.org/doc/effective_go.html#composite_literals – user7014993 Mar 11 '17 at 21:53

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