I have the following code that gives me Segfault when trying to access the array splitted. Am I reallocating the array of pointers in a wrong way?

void allocate (char** splitted) {
    splitted = malloc(sizeof(char*));
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        splitted = realloc(splitted, (i + 1) * sizeof(char*));
        splitted[i] = "asd";
    }
}

int main () {
    char** splitted = NULL;
    allocate(splitted);
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        printf("%s", splitted[i]);
    }
    return 1;
}
  • What is the motivation for trying to extend splitted in a loop like that rather than trying to malloc the needed size before the loop? – John Coleman Mar 12 '17 at 0:19
  • Use the result of allocate, currently void to return the new sequence address. – WhozCraig Mar 12 '17 at 0:19
  • You have not included any library headers, please do not assume that "we know you did" just because you have rep. You should know better. – Weather Vane Mar 12 '17 at 0:20
  • 2
    splitted = malloc(sizeof(char*)); is altering the argument passed, but that is only a copy of what was passed, and is forgotten on function exit, as well as causing a memory leak. So char** splitted = NULL; remains NULL and dereferencing that is bad. – Weather Vane Mar 12 '17 at 0:27
  • 2
    C is call by value, not call by reference. Use valgrind and see the memory leaking. And read how pointers work. – too honest for this site Mar 12 '17 at 0:27
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, you're reallocating your array in the wrong way - actually several wrong ways.

You're forgetting that splitted is passed by value to the function. So any changes to its value inside the function are invisible to the caller.

So either change the function to add an extra level of indirection.

void allocate (char*** splitted)
{
    *splitted = malloc(sizeof(char*));
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        *splitted = realloc(splitted, (i + 1) * sizeof(char*));
        (*splitted)[i] = "asd";
    }
}

/*  to call it in main() */

allocate(&splitted);

or change it to return the new value

char *allocate (char** splitted)
{
    splitted = malloc(sizeof(char*));
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
         splitted = realloc(splitted, (i + 1) * sizeof(char*));
         splitted[i] = "asd";
    }
    return splitted;
}

/*  to call it in main() */

splitted = allocate(splitted);

Some other notes follow.

I assume you have an #include <stdlib.h> before your code (otherwise the use of malloc() and realloc() would not compile). In future, provide a MCVE, so the people trying to help you don't have to make assumptions or guesses about things you have left out.

The call of malloc() in the function is not needed, since realloc() can accept a NULL.

Also, the realloc() does not need to be in the loop. A single realloc() before the loop will do - just supply the final intended size.

It is highly advisable to CHECK the return values of functions like realloc() and malloc(), since they can both return an error indication. Obviously, if you check the return value, you also need to handle errors sensibly.

Since your code uses malloc()/realloc() to allocate memory, you also need to release it. For example free(splitted) at the end of main(). Yes, modern operating systems clean up - except that not all systems do - so not using free() is a bad habit to acquire. Also, if you ever reuse your code (e.g. rename your main() to something else, and call it from other functions) you will have a memory leak.

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