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I am learning Haskell with programming in haskell from Channel 9 Lectures. In chapter 7, the professor implemented his own ++ operator using foldr by

(++ ys) = foldr (:) ys

and his reasoning is

  xs ++ ys = foldr (:) ys xs
= (++) ys xs = foldr (:) ys xs
= (++ ys) = foldr (:) ys

Here is the blackboard

enter image description here

I got confused here why xs ++ ys functions the same as (++) ys xs. And I let xs = [1,2,3] and ys = [4,5,6] and run them by runhaskell, they just produce different answers:

> main = print $ [1,2,3] ++ [4,5,6]
[1,2,3,4,5,6]
> main = print $ foldr (:) [4,5,6] [1,2,3]
[1,2,3,4,5,6]
> main = print $ (++) [4,5,6] [1,2,3] 
[4,5,6,1,2,3]

So what did the professor actually mean in his reasoning?

By the way, I am trying to induce by myself like the following:

  xs ++ ys = foldr (:) ys xs
= (++) xs ys = foldr(:) ys xs

foldr(:) ys xs at the right part of the equation means for each y in this Foldable ys, apply : to y and xs, which is actually what's done on the left side. Is my reasoning right?

  • You can also think of foldr k z xs as replacing all the : in xs with k, and [] with z. So foldr (:) [3, 4] [1, 2] takes 1 : 2 : [] and replaces [] with [3, 4], giving 1 : 2 : [3, 4] = [1, 2, 3, 4]. – Jon Purdy Mar 12 '17 at 23:14
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IMO, your reasoning is correct - there's an error in the video:

xs ++ ys = ...
= (++) ys xs = ...

should really be

xs ++ ys = ...
= (++) xs ys = ...

If you look at the comments to the video, you'll notice that Tom Lokhorst pointed out this error (among several others).

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