99

I am trying to write a Javascript function that takes an array, page_size and page_number as parameters and returns an array that mimics paginated results:

paginate: function (array, page_size, page_number) {
  return result;
}

so for example when:

array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
page size = 2,
page_number = 2,

the function should return: [3, 4].

Any ideas would be appreciated.

4
  • 1
    What does [3, 4] represent in relation to all the other variables? It's kind of key that you explain that explicitly
    – StudioTime
    Mar 13 '17 at 10:14
  • Use Array.slice -> array.slice((page_number - 1) * page_size, page_size) (something like that should work)
    – casraf
    Mar 13 '17 at 10:15
  • @DarrenSweeney If the array is divided into "pages", we will get 3 pages where each page is of size 2 at most: [1, 2], [3, 4] and [5]. Page number 2 in this scenario will be [3, 4].
    – SalmaFG
    Mar 13 '17 at 10:18

11 Answers 11

255

You can use Array.prototype.slice and just supply the params for (start, end).

function paginate(array, page_size, page_number) {
  // human-readable page numbers usually start with 1, so we reduce 1 in the first argument
  return array.slice((page_number - 1) * page_size, page_number * page_size);
}

console.log(paginate([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6], 2, 2));
console.log(paginate([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11], 4, 1));

2
  • @casraf: You are decreasing page_number first and then adding 1 to while slicing at page_number + 1. I didn't get whats the logic behind that. I may seem naive but can you please explain that? Jul 30 '18 at 7:58
  • 2
    It can be done in any order you want, but slice takes a 0-index number (slice from 0th item up to nth), and page sizes in links & other human readable formats usually start pages at 1 and not 0. Since we start with 1 in the front end but in actuality we use 0, I decrease it and increase it at the relevant time. You could just as easily only decrease page_number in the first argument instead of the second
    – casraf
    Aug 12 '18 at 14:15
13

Here's a solution with reduce():

function paginate (arr, size) {
  return arr.reduce((acc, val, i) => {
    let idx = Math.floor(i / size)
    let page = acc[idx] || (acc[idx] = [])
    page.push(val)

    return acc
  }, [])
}

let array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
let page_size = 2
let pages = paginate(array, page_size)

console.log(pages)    // all pages
console.log(pages[1]) // second page

It returns an array of pages so you can get a certain page, or loop through all of them.

1
  • Two params FTW!
    – phil o.O
    Jul 23 '21 at 16:22
7

I saw an example above that did this correctly (kind of) and wanted to expand on it.

This was the example.

function paginate(array, page_size, page_number) {
  // human-readable page numbers usually start with 1, so we reduce 1 in the first argument
  return array.slice((page_number - 1) * page_size, page_number * page_size);
}

There are a few things wrong with this.

1.) If the page_number is 0 then it will try and set the starting split at -1 * page_size which returns an empty array. So the minimum value of the page_number attr should be 1, never anything less unless you handle that case in the function.

2.) The starting and ending index of the split are the same. Because of this, you get back an empty array. So the split should be:

return array.split(page_number * page_size, page_number * page_size + page_size)

const myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10];

const paginateBad1 = (array, page_size, page_number) => {
  return array.slice((page_number - 1) * page_size, page_number * page_size);
};

const paginateBad2 = (array, page_size, page_number) => {
  return array.slice(page_number * page_size, page_number * page_size);
};

const paginateGood = (array, page_size, page_number) => {
  return array.slice(page_number * page_size, page_number * page_size + page_size);
};

console.log("Bad 1", paginateBad1(myArray, 2, 0));
console.log("Bad 2", paginateBad2(myArray, 2, 1));
console.log("Good", paginateGood(myArray, 2, 1));

4

Another aproach that you can utilize, is using .filter, look:

const paginate = function (array, index, size) {
        // transform values
        index = Math.abs(parseInt(index));
        index = index > 0 ? index - 1 : index;
        size = parseInt(size);
        size = size < 1 ? 1 : size;

        // filter
        return [...(array.filter((value, n) => {
            return (n >= (index * size)) && (n < ((index+1) * size))
        }))]
    }

var array = [
  {id: "1"}, {id: "2"}, {id: "3"}, {id: "4"}, {id: "5"}, {id: "6"}, {id: "7"}, {id: "8"}, {id: "9"}, {id: "10"}
 ]


var transform = paginate(array, 2, 5);

console.log(transform) // [{"id":"6"},{"id":"7"},{"id":"8"},{"id":"9"},{"id":"10"}] 
2

You can use Array.filter() with the help of its second parameter (the index of the current element being processed in the array).

You'll also need the currently selected page and the number of items per page to display, so you can find the minimum and maximum index of the elements needed.

const indexMin = selectedPage * elementsPerPage;
const indexMax = indexMin + elementsPerPage;
const paginatedArray = arrayToPaginate.filter(
  (x, index) => index >= indexMin && index < indexMax
);

Updating the selectedPage and/or the elementsPerPage value will allow to return the correct items to display.

1

The use of Array#slice is the expected answer.

Here I use Symbol.iterator to create an iterable.

const arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

function page({arr, pageSize, pageNumber}) {
    const start = pageSize*(pageNumber-1)
    const end = pageSize*pageNumber
    return {
        *[Symbol.iterator]() {
            for(let i = start; i < arr.length && i < end; i++) {
                yield arr[i]
            }
        }
    }
}

console.log([...page({arr, pageSize: 5, pageNumber: 2})])

0

Hey I'm sorry I'm a bit late but we can use the Array.splice(start, end) method except this is much simpler

const page = 2
const step = 2;
const start = page * step - step;
const end = start + step;

const array = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
console.log(array.splice(start, end))
0

function paginate(array, page_size, page_number) {
  // human-readable page numbers usually start with 1, so we reduce 1 in the first argument
  return array.slice((page_number - 1) * page_size, page_number * page_size);
}
var arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]


const options = {
        //page: parseInt(req.query.page) || 1,
        page:1,
        limit:10
        //limit: parseInt(req.query.limit) || 10,
        //customLabels: servCustomLabels,
    };


        let prev_page = 0;
         let next_page = 0;
         let h_p_p = null;
         let h_n_p = null;
         let page_count = Math.ceil((arr.length / options.limit));

        if (options.page >= page_count ){  // 2 3 
            next_page = 0;
        }        
        if(options.page >= 1 && options.page < page_count ){
            next_page = options.page + 1;
            h_n_p = true;
        }else{
            next_page = 0;
            h_n_p = false;
        }

        if(options.page <= 1 ){
            prev_page =0;
            h_p_p = false;
        }else{
            prev_page = options.page -1 ;
            h_p_p = true;
        }
        
        console.log(paginate(arr, 2, 2));
        console.log({paginator: {
                    totalDocs: arr.length,
                    perPage: options.limit,
                    pageCount: page_count,
                    currentPage: options.page,
                    //slNo: 2,
                    hasPrevPage: h_p_p,
                    hasNextPage: h_n_p,
                    prev: prev_page,
                    next: next_page
                }})

0
function paginate(arr, PerPage) {
  let map = {};
  let startPage = 1;
  arr.forEach((current) => {
    if (map[startPage] && map[startPage].length < PerPage) {
      map[startPage].push(current);
    }

    if (!map[startPage]) {
      map[startPage] = [current];
    }

    if (map[startPage] && map[startPage].length >= PerPage) {
      startPage++;
    }
  });

  return map;

}

you will find an example on this link

0

The example below is using iter-ops library (I'm the author).

// our inputs...

const array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];

const pageSize = 2;
const pageIndex = 1;

The most efficient way is to process an array as an iterable, so you go through it once.

If you never need other pages, then the fastest way is like this:

import {pipe, skip, page} from 'iter-ops';

const p = pipe(
      array,
      skip(pageSize * pageIndex), // skip pages we don't want
      page(pageSize) // create the next page
).first;

console.log(p); //=> [3, 4]

And if you do need other pages, then you can do:

const p = pipe(
      array,
      page(pageSize), // get all pages
      skip(pageIndex) // skip pages we don't want
).first;

console.log(p); //=> [3, 4]

And in case you need to do further processing:

const i = pipe(
      array,
      page(pageSize), // get all pages
      skip(pageIndex), // skip pages we don't want
      take(1), // take just one page
      // and so on, you can process it further
);

console.log([...i]); //=> [[3, 4]]
0

Here is another variation using Array.from with Array.slice

const paginate = (array, n) => {
  const pageSize = Math.ceil(array.length / n);
 
  return Array.from({ length: pageSize }, (_, index) => {
    const start = index * n;
    return array.slice(start, start + n);
  });
};

How to use it

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